Diesel Exhaust - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 9 Old 04-13-2007 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
bbistis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Orchard Park, NY
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Diesel Exhaust

Anyone solved the issue of black soot stains on the transom (besides contant cleaning)?
bbistis is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 04-13-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Don't motor... Sailing produces no smog or soot...

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 9 Old 04-13-2007
Learning the HARD way...
 
eherlihy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Boston / Ft Myers Area
Posts: 3,995
Thanks: 157
Thanked 99 Times in 96 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Yes,

Frequently the soot is a sign that your engine is not running properly. Problems could include fuel mixture too rich, too big a prop, low idle, crappy fuel... I'd check it out.

Ed
eherlihy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 9 Old 04-13-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Most common possible causes:

Plugged air filter or insufficient air flow to engine
Too much exhaust back pressure
Defective turbo/supercharger, if there is one—not particularly likely as most sailboat diesels aren't super/turbocharged.

Dirty fuel

Fouled injectors
Injection timing off

Prop improperly sized—too big
Heavily fouled bottom
Too many accessories being driven
Rope around propshaft

Assuming you've checked the prop sizing, haven't added any new engine-driven accessories—like a new refrigerator or alternator, cleaned the bottom of the boat and checked to see the prop shaft is clear. I would check the air flow and the air filter.

If the air filter and air flow to engine are good and the engine isn't overloaded... I would test it by using putting good clean diesel into a portable tank and then feeding the engine from the portable tank. If it is still blowing black smoke, then it is most likely a problem with the injectors—either they're fouled or the fuel injection timing is off.

I would also inspect the exhaust system to make sure it hasn't got a crimped or kinked hose or a hole in it someplace. This isn't all that likely, unless you've made changes near or to the exhaust system setup.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 04-13-2007 at 01:53 PM.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 9 Old 04-13-2007 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
bbistis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Orchard Park, NY
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Thx Dog... all good suggestions, but I don't see any of them actually pertaining me, except perhaps dirty (sp: old) fuel, because I sail 99.9% of the time and use less than a tank per year. My staining issue is not excessive, but more like common to just about every diesel boat/car I've ever seen. Trouble is I'm a neatnick, looking for an easier fix than cleaning and waxing. I think I'll just add the last 0.1% and sail all the time so I don't have to worry.
bbistis is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 9 Old 04-13-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
bb-

They have a wax that now contains PTEF, a form of Teflon, which is supposed to work pretty well. It might help make it so the soot doesn't stick as much to the fiberglass. PS magazine rated the stuff pretty highly... it's from West Marine... You can see it here.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 9 Old 04-17-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 288
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
I had great success recently with Starbright's Black Streak Remover, available at chandleries, in removing black streaks and any exhaust stains--just spray on, leave for a minute, wipe off, rinse, wax. Worked like a charm!
Frank.
FrankLanger is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 9 Old 04-17-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
BTW, the Mr. Clean magic eraser sponges probably do a really good job at cleaning that stuff off the hull.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 9 Old 04-19-2007
Senior Member
 
resdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 187
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
I used to have an old C&C 30 that always had an exhaust stain on the transom. There was nothing wrong with the engine. After watching the stern quite a few times I noticed the way the water flowed behind the boat created a backwash on the transom and would deposit soot that was on the surface of the water. That's beside the point, but I used Simple Green and a scrubber which effectively took the wax off the transom so yes I was constantly scrubbing it until I decided to ignore it. The only time I saw it was when I was in the water behind the boat.
resdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
slight oil slick in diesel engine exhaust mcagney Gear & Maintenance 7 04-04-2013 01:15 AM
Diesel Fuel Essentials Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-22-2004 07:00 PM
Diesel Fuel Essentials Tom Wood Her Sailnet Articles 0 03-22-2004 07:00 PM
Diesel Exhaust Systems Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 11-07-2001 07:00 PM
Replacing the Diesel Engine Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-12-2000 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome