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Old 04-27-2007
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removing hose from seacock

Is tougher than I thought it would be!

When I bought my boat, the surveyor said the sink drain hose showed signs of weeping and should be replaced. Also that the hose clamps on that hose were corroded. It didn't look all that bad to me, but BoatUS Insurance told me to fix the problem or else. I assume BoatUS will eventually send a followup letter asking whether I've done it, and I hate to lie, so today I loosened the clamps and pulled the top end of the hose loose, but the bottom end just didn't want to come off the seacock. Is it always this hard to get a hose off a seacock? What's the best way to break it loose?

BTW, the clamps were discolored but I didn't see any rust on em.
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If you're at a dock with shorepower, use a hair dryer to warm the hose. If you don't have access to power, use hot water. This will soften the hose and make it easier to remove.

If they are stainless steel, the discoloration is a sign of corrosion. On stainless steel, you may not see "rust" per se...but they could still be corroding.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
If you're at a dock with shorepower, use a hair dryer to warm the hose. If you don't have access to power, use hot water. This will soften the hose and make it easier to remove.

If they are stainless steel, the discoloration is a sign of corrosion. On stainless steel, you may not see "rust" per se...but they could still be corroding.
What do you do with the hot water? Pour it into the hose?
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Pour it over the outside of the hose... the hotter, the better. BTW, if the hose throughhull is under water, please close the seacock before proceeding.
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A propane torch will give you a lot more usable heat for the same task. Otherwise, make a few slices at the hose end, lengthwise, and pry the hose off the seacock. If there is residue, particularly if the hose was rubber, take some sand cloth or emery and clean up the male end of the seacock before installing the new hose. A little silicone grease on the barb will make sliding the new hose on easier.
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If its not wire reinforced hose then slit it lengthwise and just replace the hose with new. If its wire reinforced you won’t be able to slit it. Believe it or not there is a tool for this and working on boats its worth having one. It looks like am ice pick with the end bent at 90 degrees. You work it between the fitting and the hose to break it free all the way around and then pull up with the tool and a good grip on the hose at the fitting. If you pull from above the fitting you make everything into Chinese handcuffs.
Good luck and all the best,
Robert Gainer
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When we on the work boats had to change out a peavy (rubber hose going to a seacock). We'd close the seacock. (most important step or send the junior crew member down to plug it.) Take a sharp knife and cut the peavy off at the end of the seacock. Then carefully slice the remaining piece off the seacock itself. Either by slipping the point of the knife under the *&%$& remaining piece of hose and slicing upwards or pushing a flat tip screwdriver or awl under and slicing on the hump those tools form. Taking care not to deform the male end of the seacock.
That way I don't have to deal with boiling water or open flames in a confined space.
Oh! I did carefully measure the length of the hose and had the replacement at hand before I started doing anything. Along with new SS hose clamps.

Now the end of the new hose may have to be heated by emersing into boiling water to make it expand and pliable in order to shove it onto the male end of the seacock. DON'T use a torch to do this.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tartan34C
If its not wire reinforced hose then slit it lengthwise and just replace the hose with new. If its wire reinforced you won’t be able to slit it. Believe it or not there is a tool for this and working on boats its worth having one. It looks like am ice pick with the end bent at 90 degrees. You work it between the fitting and the hose to break it free all the way around and then pull up with the tool and a good grip on the hose at the fitting. If you pull from above the fitting you make everything into Chinese handcuffs.
Good luck and all the best,
Robert Gainer
Ah, so! Who sells those tools?
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You can find one at an autobody supply store, or a good auto parts store. They use them to put in headliners and trim gaskets. Looks kinda like an ice pick with the end bent over, as Tartan said. You insert the tip under the hose and work it around between the fitting and the hose. You may find it easiest to cut the hose through, crossways, as close to the barbed fitting as possible, without cutting into the barb, and then be able to work from two ends of the remaining hose.
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Last edited by sailaway21; 04-28-2007 at 04:31 PM.
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btw,
When you are using a torch in a confined area, where damage to adjacent surfaces is to be avoided, a piece of sheet metal makes a good shield. Place it behind the item being heated. Also, Home Depot has a fireproof rag that serves a similar purpose. You can find it with the torches there.
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