British Seagull? Dinghy engine advice needed - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #21  
Old 05-03-2007
Pamlicotraveler's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Creedmoor NC
Posts: 569
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
Pamlicotraveler is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw
Seagulls are in fact held in high regard by corduroy trouser wearing anoraks (with elbow patches) who actually know what is meant by sheerstrake, oakum and pitch and who even know their intended use. Brave souls who take cold baths in the winter , wear woollen underpants, swear by a gaff rig and consider everything that has happened post Disraeli to be a retrograde step with the possible exception of Margaret Thatcher.

If your concept of cutting edge technology is a 1948 Morris Minor then Seagull is your kind of motor.
I love the Morris Minor. In fact my first car was an MGA and I still dream about it, but mainly because it turned me into a babe magnet during those awkward high school years.

1960 MGA


Back to the British Seagull topic...I don't remember them being an engineering marvel, just plain simple with an exposed flywheel and everything. But my memory is handing one back and forth to the person on the dinghy with one hand. How could the British make something so simple when their toilets have tanks and pull cords etc.
__________________
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things y%^&*.....oh never mind. 90% of the people on sailing forums already use that as their signature! I'm not a conformist.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 05-03-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Beacon, New York
Posts: 652
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Tartan34C will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw
There are many things the British do that are admirable. Making engines is not one of them.

Seagulls are in fact held in high regard by corduroy trouser wearing anoraks (with elbow patches) who actually know what is meant by sheerstrake, oakum and pitch and who even know their intended use. Brave souls who take cold baths in the winter , wear woollen underpants, swear by a gaff rig and consider everything that has happened post Disraeli to be a retrograde step with the possible exception of Margaret Thatcher.

If your concept of cutting edge technology is a 1948 Morris Minor then Seagull is your kind of motor.

I have three British Seagulls in service and one needing repair do to being dropped some distance and breaking a casting. I also have two new outboards in service one being a 2006 and the other a 2004 model year. The 2006 is a very nice four stroke and works well but any of the Seagulls will out pull both new engines. Aside from business I also use a Seagull on my own boats tender and I have been using them for over thirty years now.

The Seagull may be old technology but they are simple slow turning large propeller engines that are easy to maintain and hard to kill even after a dunking. A modern outboard is hard to restart after a dunking and because of the electronics will need some service after a bath.

They are not suitable for everyone and if you want a fast small boat as a tender they are not the best choice but if you want a strong bulletproof outboard that has a chance of pulling the mother ship when she has a problem or something that will stand the rigors of anchor handling and working in the surf then a Seagull, especially one with a storm hood on the carburetor, is the way to go.
All the best,
Robert Gainer
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 05-03-2007
kennya's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ok.
Posts: 117
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
kennya is on a distinguished road
On ebay from time to time I see the old Cruse and Carry, $150 to $175. I have one I use on my dingy 1.5 horse and 12 lbs, I also a Sears air cooled 3 horse at 24 lbs I purchased a rebuilt one for $250.00 and use it on a 14 ft aluminum I use for fishing. Both have the
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 05-03-2007
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,475
Thanks: 5
Thanked 69 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Brand new... just got it... believe it is a 2007 model. However, it is a four-stroke... that may be why it doesn't have an option for an external tank, since four-strokes are considerably more fuel efficient than two-stroke engines are.
Guess that's the answer. We were looking 2-stroke.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 05-03-2007
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,475
Thanks: 5
Thanked 69 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pamlicotraveler
I love the Morris Minor. In fact my first car was an MGA and I still dream about it, but mainly because it turned me into a babe magnet during those awkward high school years.

1960 MGA


Back to the British Seagull topic...I don't remember them being an engineering marvel, just plain simple with an exposed flywheel and everything. But my memory is handing one back and forth to the person on the dinghy with one hand. How could the British make something so simple when their toilets have tanks and pull cords etc.

MGAs are a slightly different kettle of fish to the Minor but they were still anitiquated in their technology. That goes for the MGB as well. Not to mention those rotten Lucas electrics. No real surprise that the Japanese virtually forced the British out of the motor bike and sports car markets. (yes they've made a bit of a comeback in recent years but the big names are long gone. )

My Seagull rant was a bit tongue in cheek. They do have a reputation for simplicity and enough grunt to pull up tree stumps. Would I buy one ? Round about the same time as I buy a Morris.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 05-21-2007
Pamlicotraveler's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Creedmoor NC
Posts: 569
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
Pamlicotraveler is on a distinguished road
I mentioned it in another thread, but just to update this one...I ended up following SD and Bump's choices... I couldn't find the right Seagull so I bought a Tohatsu 3.5 hp. It's a 2 stroke and very manageable weight with no hoists needed. Tried it out this weekend and it did fine.



If it isn't enough I saved that heavy old Johnson 15hp and can change my mind later.

I'm keeping it simple...I have enough complications on my boat. Thanks for the advise all! (note: I still have a sentimental streak for the Seagull...that was my youth. But I'll find some other retro-toy for my mid-life crisis )
__________________
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things y%^&*.....oh never mind. 90% of the people on sailing forums already use that as their signature! I'm not a conformist.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Choosing a Dinghy Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-11-2004 08:00 PM
Replacing the Diesel Engine Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-12-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:13 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.