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Old 05-02-2007
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Bottom painting a trailerable sailboat

I'm thinking of downsizing to a trailerable sailboat to reduce expenses. But, how to paint the bottom if it's on the trailer? Do I take it to the yard to have it lifted? If so, doesn't the cost of that offset the savings?

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Old 05-02-2007
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I've never had to do it, but a friend painted his trailerboat bottom as follows:

Buy a set of two jack stands, position them on one side and screw the poppets up until that side is lifted up off the trailer rollers. Paint that side, allow to dry overnight and reposition the stands to paint the pad areas. Then repeat the same on the opposite side. If applicable, you may have to support the keel with blocks as well.
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Old 05-02-2007
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If by "trailerable" you mean stored dry, I don't think anti-fouling paint is a major concern (assuming fresh water). Trailering before & after each sail will scrape the paint off in no time.

Disclaimer: I'm still learning this stuff. My boat is stored dry & bottom paint has become a lost cause rather quickly.
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Old 05-02-2007
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If you talking about a boat that is normally stored in the water, but can be trailered, you will need antifouling. However, if you normally will be storing it on the trailer, and then just putting it in the water to sail it... you may not need anti-fouling...

You can often paint the bottom of a trailerable by painting around the pads on the trailer, and then jacking the boat up to paint the area under the pads. That is what I'll be doing later this month, since my boat is "trailerable", even though it normally sits in a marina slip.
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Old 05-03-2007
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Just finished that job on a 21' Cal, with a 400 lb swing keel. The total weight of the boat is 1100lbs. The toughest work is removing the old paint, unless there are no compatibility problems. Jacking it off the trailer was fairly straightforward, once I decided upon an approach.

The underbody of my hull aft is fairly flat, approaching horizontal, and this dictated the type of boat jacks that I purchased. The ones for my aft end are actually planing hull boat stands. The two for the bow are more angled as you'd commonly see on a sailboat in a yard. The main issue with them is, of course, getting the trailer out from under. I accomplished this with a 3x5" timber, 12' long, and cement blocks. First I laid down a couple of 3/4" sheets of plywood, athwartships, under bow and stern. My driveway is unpaved and I planned on having the boat on the stands all winter. I wasn't looking for a midnight grounding in my own driveway come spring and so the stands sat on the plywood.

First I placed the planing boat stands under the counter (stern) and jacked them up slightly to take some load. Then I used a 20 ton bottle jack under the bow, aligned on the keel, with a 2x4" that I had cut a 'V' notch into. I bought the bottle jack at a discount tool warehouse for around $30. I obviously did not need the 20 ton capacity for this job, the size of the jack promised more stability. And, if I decide to relevel Casa Squalor, I've got just the tool. I blocked up the bottle jack under the bow with scraps of 4x4" and slowly jacked the bow up off the trailer. The rear stands, under the counter, provide athwartships stability. When I had it as high as it would go, I placed the timber athwartships under the bow, supported outboard by the cement blocks. The 3x5" timber was ideal for this as I could rotate it for either a 3" height or a 5" height as needed. With the timber under the bow, safely far enough aft that the rake of the bow was not a factor, I released the strain on the bottle jack and lowered the weight of the boat onto the timber. I then reblocked the bottle jack and jacked it higher yet. Cement block, 8", by cement block I brought the bow up. I jacked the stern up enough to clear the trailer bunks. I ended up with the hull about three feet off the ground. I could go higher but that was the limit of my boat stands. Even before I got that high, I was able to rest the bow on the timber and pull the approx. 8' wide trailer out from under the boat.

Once i had the trailer out and i had the boat to the limit of the aft boat stands, I was able to level it up at the bow, and bring in the forward boat stands to support it. Make sure you chain the boat stands together athwartships. Also, as you are raising, make sure the stands do not start to tilt or ****. The bottom is now painted, with the exception of the portion where the boat stands are holding the hull. I plan to slide the timber under the stern, remove the stands, sand and paint, replace the stands, do the same procedure at the bow without replacing the stands, and slide the trailer back under her. And you can call me a moron if i forget to rewire the trailer with the boat off it again this year!
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Old 05-03-2007
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If the trailor has rollers rather than bunks, painting the bottom is easy. Paint the bottom except for the area under the rollers. Hook the trailer to the tow vehicle. Lower the keel support bar. Let out about 12" of the trailer winch cable. Put the tow vehicle in reverse and get the trailer rolling backwards slowly. Step on the brakes enough to cause the boat to roll back on the trailer. You might have to let out a little more cable and do it a second time to move it back a total of about 15-18". Paint the area under the rollers and let it dry thoroughly. Use the trailer crank to move the boat forward on the trailer. Don't forget to raise the keel support bar.
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Old 05-03-2007
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Too risky!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormon6
If the trailor has rollers rather than bunks, painting the bottom is easy. Paint the bottom except for the area under the rollers. Hook the trailer to the tow vehicle. Lower the keel support bar. Let out about 12" of the trailer winch cable. Put the tow vehicle in reverse and get the trailer rolling backwards slowly. Step on the brakes enough to cause the boat to roll back on the trailer. You might have to let out a little more cable and do it a second time to move it back a total of about 15-18". Paint the area under the rollers and let it dry thoroughly. Use the trailer crank to move the boat forward on the trailer. Don't forget to raise the keel support bar.
9 out of 10 times this might be successful, but the 10th time could cause some damage or someone could get hurt. You are dealing with a lot of weight and therefore a lot of inertia. Just think what would happen if the winch cable came loose or snapped--boat on ground lying on its side. This needs to be done with boat jacks, not sliding the boat around on the trailer by jamming on the brakes!
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Old 05-03-2007
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I have painted the bottom on myMac 26 in a way similar to Sailormon with one exception. After painting all possible surfaces, I went to the nearest launch ramp and refloated the boat then brought it back onto the trailer 12 inches further aft.

After the water dried on the bottom, I painted all of the bare surfaces. After the paint dried, I refloated the boat back onto the trailer in the proper position.
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Wink

Here's a DIY Lift if you're feeling industrious (and brave).
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Old 05-03-2007
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Where to get jacks

I am in a similar position. Looking at the DIY pic makes me think I could get a few jacks for the price of the lumber that person set up. However, how does one go about getting jacks?
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