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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #21  
Old 05-19-2007
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Quote:
please write back AFTER YOU HAVE TWO BOATS SURVIVE A CAT 5
with your new toys
After more than 10 years of experience with my “new untested overpriced toy”.. fortunately we have much more than two boats that have survived storms, hurricanes and even tsunamis.. If you request, I can copy there all the reports we have received..


Like all other Fisherman anchors, “Capt nat H fisherman” one has a very bad holding to weight ratio and to only have a “moderate” holding you should largely oversize them.. and I will NEVER use one in a real storm ..


And if you like “Experienced anchors”, why not using the Killick anchor.. more than twice the experience of the Fisherman and still satisfactory used in some parts of the world..
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  #22  
Old 05-20-2007
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related question??? when does anchor chain get too old ? and how can you tell ahead of time ??? what clues do you look for ??
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  #23  
Old 05-20-2007
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Escapade-

Assuming you're not using stainless steel chain—the galvanizing will start to go first, then the links will start to corrode. If the galvanizing is in good shape, the chain should be in pretty good shape. As the links corrode, they get thinner in wire diameter... comparing the two ends of the chain is a good way to keep an eye on it—since the on-board end will usually suffer less corrosion on an all-chain rode. I would replace the chain when you start seeing links that are visibly thinner than the original. Flipping the chain end for end can help even out wear and corrosion.

If you start seeing rust...well, then you either have to re-galvanize the chain, to prevent it from rusting further, or replace it. Unfortunately, since most of the connector-type links are either much weaker or much larger than the corresponding chain, you will probably have to replace the entire chain, rather than just getting new to replace the damaged sections.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #24  
Old 05-21-2007
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This thread has gotten a lot of varied and very good input, though there is, as always, some polarization concerning 'likes' and 'dislikes' of anchor design.

If I get caught here in a hurricane, I will have to do the best I can with what I have. My boat is massively strong and has plenty of huge cleats and mooring bits. Actually, anyone interested in seeing it, and the building process, it is on a website I'm putting together.

Home

I have lived all my life on the water, mostly on the New England coast, where I respectfully refer to the North Atlantic as 'The Lion In Winter'. I have been here in Florida for ten years and came a 'click' away from having Hurricane Charlie stampede over me, and believe me, I saw the destruction and know the risks.

I am a recently disabled Viet Nam vet and have no insurance on my boat other than my own intellect and tenacity. I have nowhere else to go if a storm hits. I'll find an inlet and tie off like a spiderweb, or go to good holding and set all 5 anchors on fresh, heavy rode with proper chafing gear, strip off everything above deck, go below and listen to the radio.

My decisions in this situation are dictated by things that are tempoarily beyond my control, and once I get out of this position, it will never happen again. I am finishing the boat and will no longer be restrained by incomplete systems on board or a ton of extra gear in storage or piled on deck. I can't tell you how sick I am of stepping over piles of materials waiting to be used, and half a dozen tool boxes, and two cases of power tools. Good grief. It may take a year or two for me to walk around the boat without lifting my feet knee high to step over something. Enough rant about that. I'm grateful to have gotten so far and have my health rapidly returning.

Thanks for all the input.

Hawk
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  #25  
Old 05-21-2007
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Hawkeye,
It took me an hour but I read it! You're one tenacious s.o.b. and I mean that in a complimentary way.(g) I particularly admire your ability to make do with what you've got, and re-do as necessary-good on ya! It was a good read-I'm sure other members will enjoy it as well. Good luck.
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  #26  
Old 05-22-2007
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nota is on a distinguished road
Reseting???????

That Means Your Useing One Anchor

Thats Wrong

Allways Use At Least Two

Then You Never Have To Worry About Shifts

And If For More Then One Nite Or Bad Storms 3 Or More
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  #27  
Old 05-22-2007
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Nota-

Always using two anchors is a royal pain... You're generally much better off IMHO getting a properly sized primary anchor and using just it unless you are expecting storm conditions. If you have to always use two anchors to prevent your boat from dragging... you're using anchors that are clearly too small for your boat.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #28  
Old 05-22-2007
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What about an ARK anchor?

Have a look at the 'educative' notes for safe anchoring as well as the new ARK anchor design at Noahs Ark Anchors, simply the best, safety first, quick setting,

regards - terry
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  #29  
Old 05-22-2007
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Spade works well on our Outbound 44

We now have 15,000nm under the keel of our 44' Outbound, including a trip around Vancouver Island and two seasons cruising from the West Coast to Australia. We use a Spade S140 (~66 lbs.). Although we used a 35 lb. CQR on our previous 30' coastal cruiser, we chose the Spade based on excellent test results in Practical Sailor and other magazines.

The Spade has performed brilliantly in the Pacific Northwest and 95% of anchorages in the South Pacific. It sets the first time 98% of the time and has never broken out due to wind or tide shift. The most notable exception was in Fiji, where in several anchorages it didn't set well and we resorted to another anchor. The Spade is simple, well-designed and well built, and has been one of the best all-around anchors in many comparitive tests.

We also carry an aluminum Spade of the same size (A140, about 35 lbs.), a 45 lb. Bulwagga, and a Fortress FX-85 (a very large aluminum Danforth-type, also about 45 lb.). The aluminum Spade has been our second anchor of choice due to its lighter weight, and the Fortress is our last resort. We have the least experience with the Bulwagga but it has performed perfectly every time we have put it down. I don't think the Bulwagga is engineered quite as well since it relies on welds for its strength.

Note on anchoring in mud: don't assume anchors with mud settings necessarily work better. Check out Practical Sailor, which has tested this and found that for the Fortress and some others, the regular setting worked better. I wouldn't sweat it, though, because if you have thick mud you can probably get better holding in it than any other bottom.

Pictures of our boat and logs of our cruises can be found at SV Sequoia home page.
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  #30  
Old 05-22-2007
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Terry-

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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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