Draining sediment from RACOR- need to bleed engine? - SailNet Community
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post #1 of Old 05-14-2007 Thread Starter
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Question Draining sediment from RACOR- need to bleed engine?

I am a first time boat owner (Catalina 27) who has an older RACOR model 200FG with the clear bowl at the bottom. I can see quite a bit of sediment that needs to be drained. If I loosen/depress the nipple and drain the gunk, will air be introduced to the filter housing? Can I just fill the filter with fresh diesel without having to bleed? I have a Universal Model M-18 (14hp) that I'm sure is not self bleeding like the new Westerbekes.

Guess I have a little stage fright with having to bleed my engine for the first time if in fact I will need to. I guess my filter is about the same height as my fuel tank but I think the end of the fuel pick up tube is below the lowest level of the fuel filter drain.

Tim Haibach
Boatless
Texas City, TX

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post #2 of Old 05-14-2007
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Just open the top and bleed it via the nipple then pour enough diesel into the bowl to refill. You should change the filter at the same time though...No air should get in.

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post #3 of Old 05-14-2007
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Even if a little air gets in...IMHO it is better that you learn to bleed the fuel system now, rather than trying to figure it out in the middle of a storm, with the boat blowing down on a lee shore line... BTW, I generally have new owners mark the various screws that you need to bleed the diesel fuel system with a neon or or other brightly colored paint. That way, in an emergency, you can find them easily and quickly.
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post #4 of Old 05-14-2007
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In a "new, used" boat if there's enough sediment to disturb you in the bowl I'd change the filter, and try to get as much fresh fuel as possible into the tank. The fuel in the tank now must be a little old and you are going to need to keep an eye on the amount of sediment that collects until you are able to run for 100 hrs. or so with no crap collecting in the bowl. Bleeding the air is pretty easy usually and as dog remarked it can be a REALLY important skill.
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post #5 of Old 05-15-2007
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If the worst comes to the worst, normally there will be a bleed screw on the back end of the injector pump where the air can be bled out before it gets into the pump or injector lines.

I don't know if your setup has a lift pump on the engine but if it does (normal)and the bleed screw referred to above is easily found then bleeding the air out should be simple.

Andre
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post #6 of Old 06-09-2012
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Re: Draining sediment from RACOR- need to bleed engine?

Ok, I have a dumb question. I have the Racor 200fg also and I don't know how to remove the bowl or how exactly the drain at the bottom works. Could someone help me out? I hate screwing/pushing things when I don't know what is supposed to be screwed/pushed/removed - especially in the engine room.


Update: I found the manual. This may help others as well.

Model, 200FG, 200FGM, 500FG, 900FG, 75/900FG, 1000FG, 73/1000FG, 75/1000FG, 77/1000FG, 79/1000FG

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B7k...TNubWJBUVV3Uzg
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Racor 200fg.jpg  

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post #7 of Old 06-10-2012
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Re: Draining sediment from RACOR- need to bleed engine?

With that model, I believe the filter unscrews from the housing above. The bowl unscrews from the filter. It can be difficult to unscrew the bowl as the 2 sometimes get "varnished" together. Sometimes using a screwdriver jammed through the filter and a belt wrench or oil filter wrench around the plastic bowl gives you enough leverage to separate the two. Remember to wet the gasket with diesel prior to reconnecting and always fill new Racor with fresh diesel to minimize air in lines. I underscore the statements made by others to get experience bleeding you diesel now before an emergency occurs. If you have sediment in the bowl, there is stuff in the tank that when stirred up by wave action. This might be enough to clog a filter and require a change at sea. Carry spares on board plus get the experience needed to change the filter / bleed the engine when not in crisis mode.

Tod

Mandolin
Bayfield 36
Sailing out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay
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post #8 of Old 06-10-2012
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Re: Draining sediment from RACOR- need to bleed engine?

This is for M25 engines, but yours is pretty much the same

Bleeding M25 Series Engines 101- A Summary of Links for You

Read the links, too.

Go to Marine Diesel Engines and Engine Parts - Universal, Volvo, Westerbeke, Yanmar, MASE, find your engine, there used to be "How to Bleed" instructions there.

Stu Jackson, C34, 1986, M25 engine, Rocna 10 (22#)
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