Sanding and Fairing teqnique - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 05-19-2007
patrickbwells's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Olympia
Posts: 41
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
patrickbwells is on a distinguished road
Sanding and Fairing teqnique

I am repairing and painting a fiberglass deck that is nearly 30 years old. I have injected resin into delaminated areas, filled holes, faired other areas, and sanded as many as four layers of paint and non skid buildup in some areas. Needless to say, even after days and days and days of sanding, the surface remains less than perfect. What are some techniques I can use to insure that the deck looks great after the paint goes on? Is there a particuliar primer that I can apply, and then use more filling compound and sanding, and then re-apply to get a nice surface?

Thanks in advance, Dusty White
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 05-19-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Believe it or not, regular ole Bondo will fair things up, esp on bare fiberglass.
You put it on and then sand it smooth. After all it's just a thick polyester resin. Now I'm not talking in thick layers where it flexes and may crack...
If you use a good paint like Interlux Brightside, you can put it on with a brush and it will flow out smooth and shiney as if it was sprayed on.
Another trick is to use a thick non-skid to hide imperfections. I've also seen (folks with alot of time and $$) strips of teak put down to strengthen and beautify a deck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 05-19-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
If you really want a nice even surface... why don't you give it a skim coat of thickened epoxy and then sand it all after the epoxy cures. That should give you a very smooth base for the paint.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 05-20-2007
patrickbwells's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Olympia
Posts: 41
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
patrickbwells is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
If you really want a nice even surface... why don't you give it a skim coat of thickened epoxy and then sand it all after the epoxy cures. That should give you a very smooth base for the paint.
Sailingdog,
Okay, do you know of any good guides on how to perform this? Will epoxy stick to the remaining paint/non-skid/gelcoat or do I need to sand everything down to the fiberglass?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 05-20-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Unfortunately, for the best adhesion, you're going to have to sand. I'm sure that there are sections in either Nigel Calder's or Don Casey's various books on doing this.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 05-20-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Epoxy is good and will stick to most anything. But it is only as strong as what it is stuck to. It's not overly flexible, so if your deck flexes any, it may develope hairline cracks or crazing. It is very hard to sand, so place it carefully. The main reason gelcoat cracks and crazes, is that the structural polyester resin/glass flexes and the gelcoat doesn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 05-20-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
If the deck's soundness is even somewhat suspect, adding a few layers of fiberglass to the surface before fairing it would add considerable strength to the repair. Don't forget to wear a dust mask whenever you are sanding epoxy, as the dust isn't very healthy to inhale.

USCGRet1990 is right about gelcoat, which if applied too thickly, will craze and crack fairly readily. If applied in a thinner coat, it does flex with the underlying laminate fairly well.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 05-20-2007
oceansandmts's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Northern Vermont
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
oceansandmts is on a distinguished road
Straight epoxy is hard to sand, if you add silica filler it is about like trying to sand a piece of granite. On the other hand, if you load the epoxy with micro-balloons and/or other lightweight fillers, it is much easier to sand. I agree with the post above about putting it on carefully; the better job you do of spreading the filled epoxy the less sanding you will have to do. The West System booklets have the info you need on how to mix epoxy and fillers to serve as a fairing compound.
For the best job I would remove all old paint down to gelcoat or fiberglass, otherwise you are relying on the bond of the old paint to the gelcoat.
If I am fairing a hull I always use a longboard to sand the epoxy down flat, on a deck that will be covered with non skid, maybe not.
Regular bondo is polyester resin based, not especially water proof and likely to crack if you need to build up any thickness. I think epoxy is better.
The easiest way to go would be to use a really coarse non skid, you won't be albe to notice any imperfections in the underlying surface. I have sailed on a boat where the non skid was coarse walnut shells in paint; it looked great and you never slipped, which was good, because you didn't want skin to contact the walnut shells.
__________________
John
Chuck Paine Sarah 32 under construction
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 05-20-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Oceanandmts-

I don't know of anyone who fairs with straight, pure epoxy...aside from the difficulty of sanding it, it is also much more expensive to do it that way, without using some sort of filler to reduce the cost of the fairing job.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 05-20-2007
USCGRET1990's Avatar
SENIOR CHIEF
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: YORKTOWN, VA
Posts: 1,380
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
USCGRET1990 is on a distinguished road
Lightbulb

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickbwells
I am repairing and painting a fiberglass deck that is nearly 30 years old. I have injected resin into delaminated areas, filled holes, faired other areas, and sanded as many as four layers of paint and non skid buildup in some areas. Needless to say, even after days and days and days of sanding, the surface remains less than perfect. What are some techniques I can use to insure that the deck looks great after the paint goes on? Is there a particuliar primer that I can apply, and then use more filling compound and sanding, and then re-apply to get a nice surface?

Thanks in advance, Dusty White
I guess your going to have to post a picture of your deck, so we can decide what you need to do....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Marinetex is not ideal for fairing a keel... Sailormann General Discussion (sailing related) 9 04-28-2007 01:43 AM
Techniques for Removing Teak Decks Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 11-24-2003 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:14 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.