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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 06-07-2007
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great sailing - but on the mooring...

Love my S2 27 sailboat. Great upwind sailboat, great interior. Everything i need/want. BUT, this boat tends to swing too much on its mooring, making for some interesting action in the mooring field.

The boat has twin cleats - P/S. It is attached to a 300Lb mushroom (35 feet of chain) by 2-10' foot pennants - equal length. Our mooring field is tight.

She has a tendancy to stay on one of the pennants, then swing over to the other pennant - regardless of tide, wind combination.

Any thoughts on a solution? Was thinking of a riding sail from sail rite as a possible solution.

Thx.
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Old 06-07-2007
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I have an S2 8.5 with the same "problem". Make sure your pennants are of unequal length or you're going to see a lot of tangling and abrasion. Also look out for where the splice contacts the rubrail - I haven't found a good solution for a chafe guard there. I've considered a riding sail as well, but somehow haven't gotten around to trying it. I'll say one thing, in a breeze it sure separates the experienced launch drivers from the newbies!
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Old 06-07-2007
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Try mooring her from the stern.
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Old 06-07-2007
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Try hanging a weighted sea anchor from the bow about 4 feet under. Works better than a riding sail.
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Old 06-07-2007
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I would suggest mooring her from the stern as well. Don Jordan, inventor of the Jordan Series Drogue, has an excellent explanation of why modern boats tend to sail at anchor. You can read it here.
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Old 06-07-2007
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sailing and mooring

This is an interesting article. Reading it would suggest that a riding sail might work. Also, my concern would be that the exhaust from the diesel would be subject to flooding from incoming waves - would have to install a flapper door.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
I would suggest mooring her from the stern as well. Don Jordan, inventor of the Jordan Series Drogue, has an excellent explanation of why modern boats tend to sail at anchor. You can read it here.
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chafe guard

I may try wrapping multi layers of duct tape over the areas of the bridle eye that are in contact with the rubrail. this worked when I beefed up my tackle when Hurricane Ivan hit - at that time though it was a tropical strom in the northeast with winds around 40knots. I used mucho duct tape, and it did a great job.

Rick

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hesper
I have an S2 8.5 with the same "problem". Make sure your pennants are of unequal length or you're going to see a lot of tangling and abrasion. Also look out for where the splice contacts the rubrail - I haven't found a good solution for a chafe guard there. I've considered a riding sail as well, but somehow haven't gotten around to trying it. I'll say one thing, in a breeze it sure separates the experienced launch drivers from the newbies!
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Hesper-

You might try using a stainless steel rubstrake on the rubrail. It will help quite a bit.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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wildcard is an unknown quantity at this point
I ziptie a piece of re enforced water tubing over the rub point on the line.

Is your rudder able to swing or is it locked in place? Try tying it down hard over and see what happens? May get beter or worse but it's worth a shot.
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Wildcard-

In storm conditions, you're better off with breathable/water permeable chafe protection, since the major cause of lines failing in heavy storms is line failure caused by internal heat/friction damaging the line. Water permeable chafe protection allows water to get in and lubricate/cool the line—preventing that type of failure from occurring as readily.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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