Sail Control - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Chat  
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 06-13-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Duke 7184 is on a distinguished road
Sail Control

I'm considering Lazy-Jacks for my 32 foot Morgan. P=36 & E=12. I would appreciate any coments on the design and installation; that is, how many lines from the boom, how high up the mast and any other info that might be helpful. Thanks, Duke
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 06-13-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
The lazy jacks should end at about the lower spreaders. You'll probably want three-legs on your lazy jacks. Set them up so they look like this:

I
I|˚\
I|...\
I|....\
I|.....\
I|...../\
I|..../..\
I|.../...
/\
I|../.../..\
+=====

You'll need some 1/4" line, four 1" stainless steel rings, five padeyes, two small blocks, and two cleats.

I would install them with a padeye at the lower spreaders on the mast, with a small block to allow you to run the lazy jacks down the mast, so you can adjust their tension. Mount the two cleats on the mast so they lead fair to the blocks.

Run the line up the mast on each side, to the block and down, and tie it to a stainless steel ring. Mount the three padeyes at 3', 6' and 9' along the boom (assuming you have a 12' boom).

Tie two lines to the 9' padeye, run them through a ring and then tie them off at the 6' padeye. These line should be about nine feet long. They'll form the blue triangle above.

Next tie two lines to the 3' padeye and run them through a ring and tie them to the ring on the first line. These lines should be about thirteen feet long. These lines will form the red triangle above.

Last, run two lines up the mast, to the blocks, and then tie them to the ring on the second line. This will form the black line of the drawing above. Tighten the lines when you're dropping the sails, and then slacken them and lead them forward when you're out sailing. This way they won't chafe on the sail.

You may need to play with the line lengths a bit to find what works best on your boat and sail.

You could do this with blocks instead of rings, but on smaller boats, the rings work just as well and chafe the sails far less. They're also a lot less expensive.

IMHO, setting the lines up this way makes them the least likely to catch on the battens when dropping or raising the sails.

BTW, I generally will pop-rivet the padeyes to the boom or mast, rather than screw them, since the stainless steel pop-rivets are a simpler, faster, easier solution, and less prone to corrosion problems. Coat the pop rivets with lanocote or tefgel before putting them in place to help prevent galvanic corrosion between the stainless steel pop rivets and the aluminum mast. The cleats should be mounted using screws. Drill holes and tap them for the proper thread size. Use lanocote on the screws, to help protect the mast from galvanic corrosion problems.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 06-13-2007 at 08:09 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 06-13-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Duke 7184 is on a distinguished road
SD, Would bungee cord be worth considering. Duke
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 06-13-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke 7184
SD, Would bungee cord be worth considering. Duke
Not for lazyjacks.

A good way to furl the sail, if you have slab reefing and lazy jacks is the method mentioned in the book Sensible Cruising. Attach three or four padeyes to one side of the boom and run a bungee cord through them. On the other side of the boom, add two or three hooks. To furl the sail, just pull the bungee over the sail and over the hook. I've illustrated the idea below. The "j" are the hooks, the "u" are the padeyes, and the "-" represents the bungee cord.

............j............j............j........... .
=======================
.....u---------u----------u---------u
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Traveler question sohi07 Learning to Sail 11 10-21-2006 12:47 PM
Sail Repairs at Sea Brian Hancock Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 09-22-2003 09:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:33 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.