keel bolt maintanence - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 06-15-2007
bestfriend's Avatar
Hitchin' a ride
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In my mind, I live in Oslo
Posts: 3,191
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough
keel bolt maintanence

I have a little rust on my keel bolts as the result of a leak that kept the bilge wet, but thats another story. The nuts and plates were originally painted and retained moisture under the paint, which has now flaked off revealing the rust. So, should I just grind off the paint and rust and coat with something water resistant, or repaint?
__________________
Great men always have too much sail up. - Christopher Buckley


Vaya con Dios
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 06-15-2007
Idiens's Avatar
Larus Marinus
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Brussels
Posts: 1,756
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Idiens is on a distinguished road
My keel stud backing plates were seriously corroded after some thirty years buried under silicon rubber and paint. I am not sure if they were even stainless steel. So I replaced them all with 316 and leave them exposed and unpainted. If yours are stainless steel, I would leave them cleaned but unpainted.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 06-15-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
If they are stainless, the paint isn't helping them any. Stainless steel needs oxygen to work properly. If they were painted, and the prep job wasn't perfect, that likely contributed to them rusting after a while. What's worse is that it may have hidden the corrosion from casual inspection. Leaving the bolts uncoated is probably best.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 06-15-2007
Gary M's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sarnia ON
Posts: 658
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Gary M is on a distinguished road
If you are sailing a CS they will be SS washers and nuts. Saltwater will produce some rusting but hopefully not much. If it appears to be mainly cosmetic then you could just clean them up and leave them alone. If it looks worse then replacemnt would be in order.
You should think about retorquing the nuts if that has not been done recently.

Gary
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 06-15-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 657
Thanks: 1
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 14
olson34 is on a distinguished road
CS built a well-desgned high quality boat, but at about 20 years (to reduce the years to a round number) time has come to drop and rebed the keel. The part of the threads you can see in the bilge is not where the problems will be. The oxygen-starved area under that and above the lead is where the threaded rod ("keel bolt") could be corroding away. We have a well-documented thread or two on this subject, with photos, over at ericsonyachts.org. While lots of boats could go an additional decade, this is a preventative maint. item that should not be forgotten just because it is mostly out of sight.
Next time you have the boat out on stands, perhaps talk to the yard or your surveyor about removing one or more nuts and washers and inspecting threads before torquing them up again... ??

Regards,
LB
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 06-15-2007
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,373
Thanks: 6
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
The bolts on our CS 36T are not painted, nor are Halekai36's, pic below. I never noticed before, but the backing plates look like aluminum to me...I would leave unpainted. A little rust is natural.

In my seven years participation on the CS discussion list, I don't remember anyone ever dropping a keel for maintenance, but it may be worth a question to see if anyone has actually done it - it certainly is nowhere on my radar.

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 06-15-2007
bestfriend's Avatar
Hitchin' a ride
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In my mind, I live in Oslo
Posts: 3,191
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough
SS they are, and I will strip them and leave them. Thanks for the heads up olson. She comes up next year and I will look at that along with repairing a through hull and possibly an awlgrip job. I love that light blue that halelai36 has on his CS36.
The plates in that photo do look like alum. I can't see mine, covered in paint.

Addendum: Backing plates are another issue. I don't know about the 36, and I have not checked the CS board yet, but the 34 is lacking plates on the deck hardware. I am wondering how the through hulls are set up. There doesn't seem to be much support on the inside.
__________________
Great men always have too much sail up. - Christopher Buckley


Vaya con Dios

Last edited by bestfriend; 06-15-2007 at 10:32 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 06-15-2007
Gary M's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sarnia ON
Posts: 658
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Gary M is on a distinguished road
Those plates look like SS to me, aluminium would be corroded much worse than that. Even SS gets a dull protective layer which you can see here.
It is easy to determine, aluminum is much softer and will scratch easily with a screwdriver etc.

Gary
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 06-15-2007
bestfriend's Avatar
Hitchin' a ride
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In my mind, I live in Oslo
Posts: 3,191
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary M
Those plates look like SS to me, aluminium would be corroded much worse than that. Even SS gets a dull protective layer which you can see here.
It is easy to determine, aluminum is much softer and will scratch easily with a screwdriver etc.

Gary
I'll get out the rusty, er trusty, magnet
__________________
Great men always have too much sail up. - Christopher Buckley


Vaya con Dios
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 06-15-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
BF-

Be aware that the better austentic grades of stainless, like 304 and 316, are non-magnetic. The martenistic grades of stainless are magnetic, and generally not recommended for marine use.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My First Boat...Boat Term Question... Kacper General Discussion (sailing related) 38 09-23-2008 06:52 PM
reducing keel/adding fin? abacosol Gear & Maintenance 9 07-01-2007 09:32 PM
Keel Bolt Repairs Don Casey Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 11-10-2003 07:00 PM
Keel Bolt Concerns Don Casey Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-12-2003 08:00 PM
The Dreaded Keel Bolt Leak Mark Matthews Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 04-07-2002 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:55 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012