Tension of Standing Rigging - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 06-18-2007
tagster's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Alameda, CA
Posts: 68
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tagster is on a distinguished road
Tension of Standing Rigging

So preparing for my trip I've been checking up on and fixing item after item on my boat...and I've noticed that my stays are all completely different tensions.

I have a lot of them.

On the foremast:
  • Two forward stays
  • Three standing/main stays
  • Two strongbacks (high tension running back stays)

On the main mast:
  • One forward stay (rigged to the foremast)
  • Four standing/main stays (one forward one aft and one pair of two center of the mast)
  • One fully adjustable running back stay (only tightened/loosened by hand using some compound pulleys and a line clip - whatever those are called)

How tight should each stay be? I'm fairly sure they should be balanced around the boat, but how much give should they have? Should I be able to shake them with my hands?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 06-18-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Sure, if you go downwind in five knots of wind.

Otherwise, the tension of the stays is usually determined by a number of factors, primary among them the type of mast you have, the diameter of the stays and shrouds, the "rake" of the mast, and the type of sailing you do.

Most stays are too slack, i.e. the rig is not optimally tuned. This can be seen on each tack, where the lee shrouds are slack. Too much slack leads to too much mast movement, work hardening, wear and crappy sail performance: The stays are the "ligaments" of the rig, with the mast, hull and chainplates forming the "skeleton" which transfers the power of the wind in the sails to move the boat. Slack stays=poor transfer, wear and eventually failure.

Consider borrowing or buying a Loos or other type of tension gauge, and determine the usual rig tensioning for your boat. Check all chainplates FIRST, because you want to ensure that the reason the stays are loose in the first place is because the chainplates are half pulled apart.

Ask for help. It's not an amateur job, but it's one easily learned and the results may surprise you.

Rigging Tension: Information from Answers.com
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 06-18-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente
Sure, if you go downwind in five knots of wind.

Otherwise, the tension of the stays is usually determined by a number of factors, primary among them the type of mast you have, the diameter of the stays and shrouds, the "rake" of the mast, and the type of sailing you do.

Most stays are too slack, i.e. the rig is not optimally tuned. This can be seen on each tack, where the lee shrouds are slack. Too much slack leads to too much mast movement, work hardening, wear and crappy sail performance: The stays are the "ligaments" of the rig, with the mast, hull and chainplates forming the "skeleton" which transfers the power of the wind in the sails to move the boat. Slack stays=poor transfer, wear and eventually failure.
Not to mention the shock loading that can occur with a loose rig... the sudden transfer of the tension and load from one side to the other can cause a catastrophic failure in a gybe, and possibly to the loss of the mast.

Quote:
Consider borrowing or buying a Loos or other type of tension gauge, and determine the usual rig tensioning for your boat. Check all chainplates FIRST, because you want to ensure that the reason the stays are loose in the first place is because the chainplates are half pulled apart.
I think you meant to say that "you want to ensure that the reason the stays are loose in the first place is not because the chainplates are half-pulled apart." A loose rig due to badly adjusted stays and shrouds is one thing, a loose rig due to failing chainplates is a different beastie altogether.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 06-18-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Yep, that's correct. Inspect the chainplates for wear, oval boltholes and cracked knees first, prior to spinning the turnbuckle to half a ton of tension.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 06-19-2007
tagster's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Alameda, CA
Posts: 68
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tagster is on a distinguished road
Heh, shows what I know.

I'll buy a tension gauge and see if I can't find a local expert to help me out with this. I don't really know anyone suitable, maybe I'll hire someone.

Determining the "usual" rig tensioning for my boat is going to be very difficult if not impossible. There aren't very many of these boats out there. Although my tensioning might need to be similar to other models by the same shipyard, but I would sort of doubt that since the other models this size have completely different rigging.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Standing Rigging Too Old? StillInShock Gear & Maintenance 79 11-23-2011 12:18 PM
Standing Rigging Basics Mark Matthews Racing Articles 0 08-29-2004 08:00 PM
Replacing Your Standing Rigging Mark Matthews Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 12-15-2002 07:00 PM
Standing rigging tension on a 21''7" Kingfisher Claus Gear & Maintenance 0 08-12-2002 04:15 PM
Standing Rigging Storage Jerry Hammill Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-15-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:18 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.