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  #21  
Old 06-20-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
IMHO, draining the fresh water tanks into the bilge is just a PITA and a bad idea. The pressure system pump should be able to handle the load of getting rid of most of the water from the system pretty easily—after all, that is what it is designed to do. It might be wise not to run it for one long burst, but in several shorter ones.

A siphon can deal with what is remaining after the pressure system has used all the water it can.
I would save the wear and tear on the pumps whenever you can..after all, when you're 100 miles offshore and the pump fails, "should have been able to handle it" isn't going to do you much good.
Use the siphon method. No wear and tear on anything.....
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  #22  
Old 06-20-2007
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A siphon might work if the boat is out of the water...but on many boats, mine included, the water tanks are below the water line, and using a siphon won't generally drain them.
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  #23  
Old 06-20-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
A siphon might work if the boat is out of the water...but on many boats, mine included, the water tanks are below the water line, and using a siphon won't generally drain them.
Good point......then I might still try to maintain my systems wherever possible. Manual bilge pump with a 10 foot extension of hose to go out a port hole? Those grey manuals work really well and its easy and cheap to put any length of cheap pool hose on the end with a hose clamp.
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Old 06-20-2007
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Ahh... that's right, many years of wintering on the hard and only the last couple in the water I didn't give that much thought - but mine probably wouldn't siphon into the sea either. Guess I'll just continue to use the freshwater pump
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Old 06-20-2007
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All,

First,

If you are going offshore or cruising, and you do not have an extra pump and (AND) an extra pressure or rebuild switch, AND a manual pump for the water tanks, shame on you. You deserve to dehydrate and live off of beer and coca colas until the CG can pick your dumb ass up.

Second,

The pump was made to run. If it is going to fail, let it fail in port. As far as the extra wear, turning it off periodically may or may not be necceessary. Call Jabsco. For the record, I never have cycled the pump. I just let it run.

Third,

I would NOT pump my tanks into the bilge because if there is ANY odor in that water, it will permeate the boat. Anyone ever had a sulfur smell in their water??? Imagine that residing on the bilge wall. And if you think you can't go through 100 gallons of water in a reasonable amount of time, just let me know and I will send my kids to your boat. They have no problem doing it in a less than reasonable amount of time. You will not be dissapointed.

Fourth,

If you really want to get those things cleaned, cut an access port into them. THis might even be considered a good offshore technique. I have not done this, but I likely will.

Just my thoughts.

- CD
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  #26  
Old 06-20-2007
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I drained both tanks today using the fresh water pump, absolutely no problem. In fact it worked so well I filled them again and drained again. I also have a Par belt driven pump that sounds like it's on it's last legs but it just kept pumping. I have a replacement for it but I plan to stow it until this one finally dies. Thanks all for your help.
Tom Shannon
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Old 06-20-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
T37Chef might be used to a dank, wet, slimy bilge, but that isn't the case for many of us. RickBowman also doesn't give any valid reasons for the practice.

Makes sense to use the pump the way it was meant to be used...
I guess you haven't heard of a wet vac uh? I never said I leave it soaking wet! or slimy! or dank! or stinky!

Makes sense to you SD, but there is more than one way to do something and it still be practical! The hose from the valves goes directly into the lowest part of the bilge, next to the pump, not only do it find that it works well, but also faster. Then I suck the remaining H2O with the cool 20th century invention called a wet/dry vacuum. Heres a picture of one...maybe you recognize it if you have ever been in a hardware store

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  #28  
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Obviously, you've never really used a wet/dry shop vac... most will not completely dry an area. Yes, they will pick up the bulk of the liquid, but they will also leave a bit behind. l still see no point in having to haul out the shop vac, when you could just as easily not be stupid about the whole thing and not get the bilge all wet in the first place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by T37Chef
I guess you haven't heard of a wet vac uh? I never said I leave it soaking wet! or slimy! or dank! or stinky!

Makes sense to you SD, but there is more than one way to do something and it still be practical! The hose from the valves goes directly into the lowest part of the bilge, next to the pump, not only do it find that it works well, but also faster. Then I suck the remaining H2O with the cool 20th century invention called a wet/dry vacuum. Heres a picture of one...maybe you recognize it if you have ever been in a hardware store

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  #29  
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Now your just being silly...theres more freaking humidity in the air on a Maryland August day than what a vac would leave behind.
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Last edited by T37Chef; 06-20-2007 at 10:52 PM.
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  #30  
Old 06-20-2007
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Note: I heartedly believe in operating all mechanical equipment on board once a week for fifteen to thirty minutes each time. This will keep the equipment from freezing up (caused by various reasons) from disuse. To many times I have taken over a boat and found that needed equipment in op due to a lack of usage. Same with the batteries. inspect the batteries each week along with the electrolyte level and gravity.

Use a shop vac?? I have used one a few times. And lifting that full tank time after time gets old after awhile. Maybe for the last few drops will I use one now. My back just isn't up to it.
Now a stripping pump (which you should have) will have a suction hose and the discharge hose you can lead out onto deck to a cockpit drain or overboard. Now the suction hose with a foot valve and strainer you can place anywhere on the boat and pump her dry. Some boats the bilges are pocketed and without limber holes to allow drainage. So a stripping pump makes sense.
On most work boats we also have a stripping pump strictly for the engines. When an engine hold 37 gls of lube oil you are not going to dump into the bilges, But pump it into a waste oil tank or 55 gl drums. Then pump good lube into the engines. A complete oil change can be up to about 110 gls.

Now on a sailing vessel I would have a small dedicated stripping pump just for the oil change on your engine and gen set. makes life easier and less chance of a dreaded oil spill.

Last edited by Boasun; 06-20-2007 at 11:21 PM.
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