8-10' Dinghy for Niagara 35 - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 16 Old 07-01-2007 Thread Starter
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8-10' Dinghy for Niagara 35

Hi Folks,
I'm sailing a Niagara 35 Mk1 on Lake Ontario and planning to head south next year. I want to get an appropriate dinghy for up to 4 people, usually 2, and the usual provision transfers. I would appreciate any other Niagara owners sharing their dinghy experiences. I am tending toward davits for stowage.
thanks and regards,
Rabbit
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post #2 of 16 Old 07-01-2007
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Hypalon..

What ever you get go with an inflatable and also hypalon. I've had very, very good luck with my hypalon AB VL series. It has been so trouble free I have not even put air into it in two years! If you don't have davits though you may want an air floor but be very careful when buying an air floor inflatable. The only brand that I know of that actually uses hypalon in the air floor is Achiles. Avon, Mercury etc. use hypalon on the hull tubes only and the air floor is PVC but they purposely try and mislead you to believe the whole thing is hypalon....

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Last edited by Maine Sail; 07-01-2007 at 07:25 PM.
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post #3 of 16 Old 07-01-2007
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If you are headed south to the Bahamas or Caribe I would suggest a RIB or hard dinghy due to the coral. Hypalon is a MUST as Halekai says.
We have a Caribe Rib and find it much better than the WestMarine/Avon RIB we had prior to this.
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post #4 of 16 Old 07-01-2007
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For rigid dinghies, you could try a 10' 6" porta-bote, which is a folding dinghy or you could also get a nesting dinghy, like a NN10. If you get an inflatable dinghy, get a Hypalon one. A RIB would be better in the Caribbean, since the coral and sand will tend to be pretty hard on a soft-bottom inflatable.

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post #5 of 16 Old 07-02-2007
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I decided against an RIB because I want a windvane instead of davits, and a 310 cm. RIB takes up too much space and visibility on deck while on passage. So we are going for Sailingdog's prescription of a 10' Portabote and an NN10 nesting dinghy, sharing a 2-3 hp engine. Gives me the flexibility to sail, row or motor, and lets me and the wife leave the boat in different directions, an occasional necessity in the voyaging lifestyle, I am lead to believe.
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post #6 of 16 Old 07-02-2007
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Sounds good to me...

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Well for 4 people I think the portabote is gonna be a little low in the water. A 10' rib will hold almost twice the weight.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
Well for 4 people I think the portabote is gonna be a little low in the water. A 10' rib will hold almost twice the weight.
I would be hesistant to put 4 adults in a 10' portabote. I have the 12' one, and it is fine with 4 adults, provided none of them are real heavyweights...

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post #9 of 16 Old 07-03-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
Well for 4 people I think the portabote is gonna be a little low in the water. A 10' rib will hold almost twice the weight.

It's not four people. It's a large man, a small woman and a five-year-old boy.

I already own a 10' RIB (which needs a retubing). I just don't feel it's the best choice to take around the world.

Now if you're talking about the OP, he should consider the 12 or the 14 foot Portabote. They are all the same thickness (4 inches).
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The 12' or 14' porta-botes would probably be a bit difficult to stow, due to their length. I have the 12' version, and store it on the ama deck... so it isn't much of an issue for me.

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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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