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post #11 of 20 Old 08-06-2007
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Nightowle -
a raw water cooled A4 should be running at about 145 deg F. ... altough most A4s with raw water cooling were supplied with 180 degree T'stats.
An A4 with a heat exchanger should be between 180 and 200. On a good running engine, the temperature of the INLET water makes a big difference; if cold water it will cool better, if warm water is being sucked in ..... .

Is your guage reading correctly. this assumes that the temperature gage and/or its 'sender' is correct. Most are not even 'close'. You can get a 'cheapy' infrared temperature 'gun' from most 'industrial supply' houses to verify engine temp. or to find 'hot-spots'. Just point the 'gun' at a spot on the engine, pull the trigger, and read the numbers.
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post #12 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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thanks everyone.

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post #13 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Nightowle -
a raw water cooled A4 should be running at about 145 deg F. ... altough most A4s with raw water cooling were supplied with 180 degree T'stats.
An A4 with a heat exchanger should be between 180 and 200. On a good running engine, the temperature of the INLET water makes a big difference; if cold water it will cool better, if warm water is being sucked in ..... .

Is your guage reading correctly. this assumes that the temperature gage and/or its 'sender' is correct. Most are not even 'close'. You can get a 'cheapy' infrared temperature 'gun' from most 'industrial supply' houses to verify engine temp. or to find 'hot-spots'. Just point the 'gun' at a spot on the engine, pull the trigger, and read the numbers.
Actually, it depends on where the boat is. Fresh water boats are often setup with a thermostat that is set for 180˚ rather than 140˚ since salt precipitating out of the cooling water and clogging the heat exchanger passages isn't a problem for fresh water boats. So it really depends on where your boat is and how it was setup. Raw water cooling on saltwater boats is generally going to run about 145˚ but a raw water cooled freshwater boat might very well run about 185˚.

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post #14 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Anyone heard of running white vinegar through to flush the cooling system? I've been told it's a "gentle" flush. You leave it run it through, leave it for 24 hours, and that's it.
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post #15 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Should work just fine since it is basically a mild acid. Most of the flushes are much stronger acids. It works to flush out light mineral deposits in the head plumbing, so no reason that it wouldn't work in the cooling system. If you really want to try it, go to the local photography supply store and get 28% acetic acid stop bath concentrate, it's probably more cost-effective than buying a few gallons of white vinegar and you can mix it up in varying strengths.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #16 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Keep the vinegar for your salads and out of the engine. Acetic (and most other inorganic acids) will attack the engine base metal .... use a proper boiler descaling compound that does not EAT the base metal of an engine. There is no such thing as a 'gentle' flush ... you either dissolve the calcium carbonate alone ...; or, the calcium carbonate with some of the cast iron.

Most A4s end their lives when corrosion bores through the sidewalls of the engine block casting .... the 'youngest' A4s are now approaching 30 years of age. Why would you want to shorten the remaining life that is left in an A4 by putting an acid through it? ....A4s dont wear out, they corrode away. Dont accelerate the 'ageing' by pouring acid into the engine !!!!! Use a proper commercial boiler descaling compound: Marsolve or Rydlyme.
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post #17 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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RichH-

Ummm.... Might want to go back and study your basic chemistry again.

Acetic Acid is an ORGANIC acid, with the formula of C2H4O. Organic acids are defined as having CARBON in them, which Acetic acid does have. It is used in many commercial descaling forumlations, and is relatively benign, and very unlikely to dissolve cast iron.

Marsolve and Rydlyme, which you recommend both contain HCl, or Hydrochloric Acid in them. HCl is an inorganic acid, which you make such dire warning about. Which is it... don't use acetic acid or don't use inorganic acids... can't have it both ways.

Go ahead and drop a piece of iron into vinegar and see what happens, and then drop a similar piece of iron into Hydrochloric acid and see what happens. BTW, the acid concentration of White Vinegar is only about 5% by volume, and that of Rydlyme or Marsolve is 10% by volume of a much more agressive acid. I seriously doubt that filling it with vinegar would do any significant damage to the block, even after 24 hours.

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Keep the vinegar for your salads and out of the engine. Acetic (and most other inorganic acids) will attack the engine base metal .... use a proper boiler descaling compound that does not EAT the base metal of an engine. There is no such thing as a 'gentle' flush ... you either dissolve the calcium carbonate alone ...; or, the calcium carbonate with some of the cast iron.

Most A4s end their lives when corrosion bores through the sidewalls of the engine block casting .... the 'youngest' A4s are now approaching 30 years of age. Why would you want to shorten the remaining life that is left in an A4 by putting an acid through it? ....A4s dont wear out, they corrode away. Dont accelerate the 'ageing' by pouring acid into the engine !!!!! Use a proper commercial boiler descaling compound: Marsolve or Rydlyme.

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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 08-07-2007 at 01:23 PM.
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post #18 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Marsolve and Rydlyme are both formulated with inhibitors so that the HCL component ONLY attacks the carbonates and NOT the iron base metals. Standard practice in the 'heat exchanger' business.

Inorganic acids (without inhibitors) will EAT away the base metal. Take your pick.
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post #19 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Inorganic acids (without inhibitors) will EAT away the base metal. Take your pick.

Only one problem with that... Acetic acid is not an inorganic acid. I never suggested using an unbuffered inorganic acid.

Why don't you go back, stop using the stomach window and read what I've written..... You're the person who is seriously confused or ignorant.... Acetic acid is not and never will be an inorganic acid, and is much less reactive than Hydrochloric, Sulphuric or Nitric acids, which are the most common inorganic acids.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 08-07-2007 at 02:10 PM.
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post #20 of 20 Old 08-07-2007
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Settle down now, dog and have a biscuit. You are still my hero but lighten up and let that stuff go, buddy.
The correct acid to use is lysergic acid diethylamide . After usage you won't care about the temperature or scale in the block. You'll say "man, look at all the pretty colors".
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