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  #1  
Old 07-31-2007
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Sort of Gear question... Fishing?

I can't find too much on this topic...

We're on a deep freshwater lake (Lake Champlain - this year) and we're looking to do some "trolling" while we're sailing. We'd like to use a rod/reel combo as opposed to just a line off the stern. Does anyone have a recommendation for a reel and rod to use for this? What questions can I answer?

Fish type in the lake include salmon, large and small mouth bass, pike, walleye, pickerel, etc. I believe we need to fishing at depths of between 20-40 feet.

Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 07-31-2007
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You can use a regular fishing rod and reel for this... I prefer spinning gear, but you could use baitcasting, spinning, flyfishing or spincasting gear.

A downrigger or planer would be a good idea, to help keep your lures at the proper depth. Most of the fish you've listed are shore and structure fish... not really open water fish so much. The walleye, pike and salmon are probably the most common as open water fish.

For the planer or downrigger gear, look here.

As for lures... spinners, buzz baits, jigs are all good choices, as are some of the swimming plugs.
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  #3  
Old 07-31-2007
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Any suggestions as to a decent reel for this application? We tried a spincasting reel we had but the drag couldn't be set enough to keep it from going out while we were sailing along... that's actually the primary reason for the question. I know nothing about reels or trolling jigs
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  #4  
Old 07-31-2007
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labatt, I would think either the 15 or 20 model would meet your needs. Not knowing your budget its just a guess.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...0002024312147a

Penn also makes a nice set of trolling reels in their Senator line, a 3 ought reel should do or possibly a 4 ought (refers to size).

Abu GArcia also makes a number of baitcasting/trolling reels in a variety of sizes and they will work as well.

If you plan to use small planes to take your baits deeper then you may want to go larger rather than smaller on the reel and be sure to buy a stout rod.

It just depends on the size of the gear you plan to hang off the rod and reel combo and then troll it behing you at 5-6 knots.....If the reel drag system can't resist the loads generated you have a problem...

I have used and still use reels from each of these manufacturers and they are all solid gear makeers. I like the Abu GArcia big Game series alot and they make both left handed and right handed crank reels in a good size for your needs. Again, your decision is somewhat dependent on your budget.

In the long run I think you will be better served buying good equipment and taking good care of it.

Hope this helps.

John
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Labatt-

That's what the down riggers are good for... they take the force of the trolling off the reel and let you set the drag properly for fighting the fish based on the strength of the line you're using. You'll do better with the dyneema-based lines, like Berkely FireLine...

I prefer not to use trolling specific reels, since the baitcasting/spinning/spincasting/flyfishing reels are far more versatile, since they can be used for sight casting as well as trolling.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #6  
Old 07-31-2007
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With endless lazarette space, the downriggers would be nice if you needed them but for the species of fish you are after I kind of doubt that to fish at 20 - 40 feet. In practice I think you will find yourself fishing at a variety of depths from the surface down to your predicted depths. A number of small planers are available and can be handled without the need for a downrigger.

I understand the benefits of downriggers that the dawg is sharing but think they will be more than you will want to carry, setup and store onboard.

When you select rods, think about how you plan to store them aboard. What lengths can you handle, do you need a 2 part rod, etc. I would suggest that a 5 1/2 ' - 6' boat rod is more than adequate in terms of length. 20 lb test monofilament is plenty strong but if you are concerned you can always respool with heavier line. Dyneema based lines are interesting but overkill for lake fishing IMHO, no offense Dawg ! If you have never used Fireline, buy a spool and go for it. Be sure you have something sharp as the dickens to cut it and learn the proper knots to use with it. Don't get me wrong, it is good line but I have tried it several times and just find it and others like it to be difficult to use but generally unnecessary. It is also not cheap.

In the end, you will develop your own preferences for line, baits, and other equipment. BUy reasonably good reels and rods and get some basic tackle and go fishing. I'm sure your local tackle shop can help with the line and basic tackle rigs that are used in your neck of the woods.

Ask your local friends about what works in your area and you will save lots of money as it is easy to spend your money an buy lots of tackle you will never use .....

Dawg, please go easy on me :-)
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I've used Fireline for fishing for almost ten years now.

I find that it works a lot better than monofilament or regular braided lines—since the much smaller diameter and low stretch give you much more control over the presentation of the lure/bait and much less drag from the water when trolling. It is a bit more difficult to cut, and you really need to have a fishing rod and reel with titanium nitride guides and rollers (the ones that are gold in color) since the dyneema-based lines tend to destroy regular ceramic guides in the course of a year's fishing.

BTW, you can also fit far more line on a reel with Fireline, since it is generally much smaller diameter than monofilament of equivalent strength.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 07-31-2007 at 10:08 PM.
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Old 07-31-2007
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I used to fish for salmon & steelhead in the great lakes. During summer they are usually down deeper, like 60' to 90'. Spring & fall can bring them up to the shallower depths. Lake Champlain could be different. So if indeed they are in the 20' to 40' range, you could use Dipsy Divers. I always ran these, even in summer and did pick up some steelhead that range in all depths. Dipsy Divers are diving planers that pull your bait down and have a clip that releases the tension when hit. You don't release the diver, just the tension that keeps it down. They come in 2 sizes and have a removable ring so that, in effect, gives you 4 sizes. I found the large diver without the ring worked for me. They do exert a strong pull on their own so you need a stout rod. I used the Penn 209 reel on a downrigger rod. The 209 is a great bargain. You can find the rod/reel combo for about $75 these days. You'll need a no stretch line, either braid or superline. Then attach a mono leader about the length of the rod from the diver to the lure. Those fish want to see lures no faster than about 3 MPH.
Have fun and don't forget to bring a net!
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Old 07-31-2007
Whampoa
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OK OK I surrender Dawg..........labatt, good luck with your gear selection....

Dawg is absolutely right, fireline is smaller and has less stretch than mono line of comparable test. An he is correct the smaller diameter will allow you to put much more line on your reel for the same/equivelant line strength. The lower stretch factor can offer you a better feel for a strike and in the hands of a kung fu fishing master (like Dawg) it might give you better control over the presentation of the lure /bait. It will also provide a more solid hook set when you jam the hook to a big one ..... You might need to practice for a while to achieve that level of finesse though.

The lower drag factor might be of benefit to you when trolling as the lure you are trolling will generally run slightly deeper with a smaller diameter line. I can't comment on the cost of gear made to handle the firelines of the world but if you don't use gear made for it you may find that your regular rod guides and reels experience unusual wear and tear as the line types the Dawg is suggesting tends to be more abrasive than mono. But he did say that too , so we are in agreement there.....

At the end of the day, just go for it ! Fishing tackle manufacturers are masters at finding new ways to separate us from our money.

Whatever you decide, have a good time doing it. Dawg, I defer to your seemingly endless skillset and knowledge base......Any photos of those downriggers on your tri?
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Old 07-31-2007
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I don't generally fish from my trimaran... except for the occassional fly fishing... And that requires site casting generally. I learned about fireline and non-titanium nitride guides and reel bail rollers the hard way... I had to get new guides put on two of my favorite spinning rods and replaced three fishing reels. The tip guide seems to go first generally.

When I lived in Missouri, we used down riggers regularly on a big bassboat a lot... but I haven't used them since.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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