It's a Sheave, not a Pulley - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 36 Old 10-06-2007
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and

If I a gal "debriefs" A guy it doosn't mean shes getting fresh! (inspired by another thread )

And a windlass is never called a winch but it is a winch.

And I could stay up all night thinking of things to add to this thread!

Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club.
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My last project!
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My boat is sold!
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post #12 of 36 Old 10-06-2007
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Breezes get fresh not gals
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post #13 of 36 Old 10-06-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailhog View Post
I'm always shouting at my wife: "It's not a mast, it's a stripper pole! Now get up there and go to work, sailor!"
LMAO! You sound like my husband!

Chris
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post #14 of 36 Old 10-06-2007
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Man there is dunage coming in here from two points abaft of the beam.

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All boats are sinking it's just a matter of how fast.
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post #15 of 36 Old 10-06-2007
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There are two reasons to insist on precise (if arcane) terminology or diction.

One: to facilitate communication between people engaged in a common pursuit, minimizing confusion or error. This is important when safety is involved or the pursuit entails careful delineation of items or fine conceptual gradation.

Two: to impress, belittle, or bully people with one's superior knowledge or grasp of the jargon. "You call it a pulley, I know it's a sheave, I'm better than you."

I suppose, just occasionally, people may die if a sailor mistakes a pulley for a sheave. But mostly, I suspect those who wave about this kind of techno-purism want to assert their superiority and ownership of the field. Bullpucky. Most sailing terminology developed from pidgin, negotiated between sailors of many languages and traditions. Zarghons (jargons) and arcana are inherently arbitrary, so insisting there is one God-given name for the bits on boats is chauvanistic and stupid. And people who insist on pure, never-changing lexicons l have no understanding how communication between human beings occurs nor how languages evolve.

As long as the right rope (cord, sheet, cable) gets pulled at the right time, the purpose has been served.

Buccaneer18, Grainnia
SJ21, Diarmuid
Albin Ballad 30, Fionn
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post #16 of 36 Old 10-06-2007
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There are two reasons to insist on precise (if arcane) terminology or diction.

One: to facilitate communication between people engaged in a common pursuit, minimizing confusion or error. This is important when safety is involved or the pursuit entails careful delineation of items or fine conceptual gradation.
But then you go on to assert...

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And people who insist on pure, never-changing lexicons l have no understanding how communication between human beings occurs nor how languages evolve.
ISTM these two assertions contradict one another, and I disagree with the latter. I think it is important to use common terminology in any pursuit. It matters not how or why it was derived. It is what it is. It is every bit as reasonable to expect a sailor to know the difference between a sheet and a chock as it is for any average person to know the difference between a hammer and a screwdriver, and to know the proper naming of each.

Jim
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post #17 of 36 Old 10-07-2007 Thread Starter
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The dumbing down of the English language is already well apace. "I mean, y'know" substitutes for actual communication of nuanced thought. I see no reason to commit lexiconic suicide for the feelings of self worth of those too lazy to learn how to communicate afloat. We are blessed with an encyclopedic volume of terminology that has withstood the test of time, and yes it has been refined through the ages, that precisely communicates specific meanings. Why would we throw it away for the comfort of someone who doesn't know and, more importantly isn't willing to learn, the difference between the capstan and the captain? The end result of that is that every little thing becomes the "hoogee" or the "como-se-llama".

And, contrary to what might be erroneously assumed, this is not an attempt to exclude those new to the sea. It is rather a call to them to immerse themselves in the wonderful lexicon that makes up our avocation and thereby be able to grow and enjoy it to the fullest possible extent. Every profession has a lexicon. And those we most admire and respect as true professionals or highly accomplished amateurs know the meanings of the words that are part and parcel of their avocation. Do you wish to be viewed as a seaman or a lubber? If you don't sound like you know what you're talking about it's unlikely that it will be assumed you do.

“Scientists are people who build the Brooklyn Bridge and then buy it.”
Wm. F. Buckley, Jr.
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post #18 of 36 Old 10-07-2007
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When understood, precise nautical terminology not only indicates the exact piece of equipment addressed, but frequently the way it interacts with other pieces of equipment, and as a side element, the bit of history associated with it.

On a ship of 100 or more years ago, there would be several dozen ropes/lines and blocks, etc. associated with even the most simple of sail maneuvers, each of which might have a force on it (or simply sheer mass) great enough to injure an ignorant handler. That's the reason for such varied terminology, and its persistence today makes for easier sailing. If I am helming, and I say "please get me my slicker in the port settee locker forward", I have a reasonable assurance that I'll have it in 30 seconds or less, and it will be a slicker, not my foulies and not a windbreaker.

Certainly among recreational sailors, the use of nautical terms can border on pretension, as we have so few control lines and light loads on most of them in many situations, but I can assure you that in a race situation or in offshore cruising, such language avoids ambiguity and increases safety and efficiency.

That said, the nautical use of "floors" and "ceilings" seems designed to baffle, even as certain names of splices seem designed to amuse.
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post #19 of 36 Old 10-07-2007
Here .. Pull this
 
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Civility dictates that we tailor our use of the argot to the the level of fluency common to the least familiar in our conversational group. If you find yourself discussing sailboats with the less-knowledgeable newcomer, and insist upon correcting every incorrect mention they make, you're going to achieve nothing except paint yourself as a supercilious wank. If you occasionally mention that things have different names when they are used on boats, then you come across as a helpful but somewhat irritating person. If you just relax and use the same words that the normal newbies use when you're trying to help them, you'll communicate much more easily. They might even buy you a beer.
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post #20 of 36 Old 10-07-2007
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Just lift up the knot in that rope in the tooth like holder on the rightside of that slider thing with the pullpin type dealey that, stops the big swingy thing at the bottom of the sail from getting loose from the other rope that lets it go in and out further from the boat when the wind picks up .


Or


Ease the starboard traveler



P.S. Strike sails dont drop them

Its hard trying to nap with that bilge pump alarm going off all the time
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