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  #1  
Old 10-19-2007
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diesel winterization questions

This question is for a 1GM10 raw water cooled.
  1. In researching winterization process steps, there is one step where there is differing opinion.
    1. The Yanmar manual states to remove fuel injector valve and put 2cc of oil and hand turn engine as.
    2. The Clymer manual doesn't even state to do this in their winter lay up section.
    3. The www.yanmarhelp.com website - a fairly extensive website operated by a yanmar technician i the UK (i think) recommends spraying CRC into the air filter.
Any thoughts on above appreciated.

2. If you run a bucket of pink antifreeze (ethyl glycol i guess) thru the engine on it is on the hard, is it still necessary to drain the engine block?

Thanks.

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Old 10-19-2007
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I use my engine all winter so I have never had to 'fog' it, but I did want to comment on using 'pink' anti-freeze. At least around here, the pink stuff is made for watertanks and other potable waterlines. Because of that purpose it lacks the lubricants that are typically included with antifreeze intended for engines and other water cooled equipment (refrigeration and AC for example). If your engine is raw water cooled and you run anti-freeze through it, then you don't need to drain the block. You don't need to drain the block on fresh water cooled engines if you are running an antifreeze/water mixture on the fresh water side, except to replace the antifreeze on some reasonable basis (see manual).

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Old 10-19-2007
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Up here in the cold NE most places like West Marine carry 3 flavors of 'antifreeze'. The pink at -50 degrees or blue -100 for your potable water systems and the Purple at -60 * with rust inhibitors ect... * for your engine. All three are environmentally friendly and not poisenous. Different companies have different degrees of protection and colors but if possible look for the rust inhibitor stuff for your engine if availible. If not don't worry that much about it many people I know have used the pink in thier engines for many years (before the engine specific safe stuff was around) without a problem.
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Old 10-19-2007
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Another question that comes to mind if the boat is on the hard when you do the winterization:

On the raw water cooled engines, wouldn't the engine need to be run long enough for it to warm up and for the thermostat to open? If the engine is cold when you run the anti-freeze through the system, won't the antifreeze largely bypass the engine block because of the closed thermostat?

I suppose you could bypass the thermostat by temporarily removing it.

In a system equipped with a heat exchanger, you only have to worry about filling the intake lines, exchanger, and exhaust with anti-freeze, since the engine block already contains it.
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Old 10-19-2007
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If you use the green anti-freeze, be sure to catch it and dispose of properly. It is poisonous to most lifeforms. There are newer extended life permenant antifreezes that range in color from amber to red. They are much more expensive.
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Old 10-19-2007
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I concur with Jeffh and the "fog" process is not needed. In New England, i've winterized three yanmars, 2QM, 3QM, & the 4 series (only the 2QM was raw water cooled). Never have i removed the fule injector during winterizing.

I'm hessitant to add any thing to the fuel system, but the fuel. And engine block drain, i assume you mean change the oil? That, i'd do, but repalce/refill the oil.
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Old 10-19-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Another question that comes to mind if the boat is on the hard when you do the winterization:

On the raw water cooled engines, wouldn't the engine need to be run long enough for it to warm up and for the thermostat to open? If the engine is cold when you run the anti-freeze through the system, won't the antifreeze largely bypass the engine block because of the closed thermostat?

I suppose you could bypass the thermostat by temporarily removing it.

In a system equipped with a heat exchanger, you only have to worry about filling the intake lines, exchanger, and exhaust with anti-freeze, since the engine block already contains it.
For this reason, I normally winterize the engine before end of season haul-out. The first season with this boat however, it was hauled out and brought inside for barriercoating the bottom - prior to winterizing the engine.

After bottom work was completed she was moved back out to sub freezing conditions. So, using a 5 gal pail with a hose leading from it to the raw water strainer, a long garden hose was then led from the same pail to a boatyard water tap. After filling the bucket with the garden hose I started the engine with the hose's nozzle adjusted to the water pump's draw rate, and ran it for several minutes to reach operating temperature.

I then shut off the hose nozzle when a couple gallons of water was left in the pail while pouring two gallons of undiluted antifreeze into the bucket - killing the engine when the antifreeze was seen ejecting from the wet exhaust. My engine is fresh water cooled, but this process assured me of the proper 50/50 mix and a total fill, of the raw water sections of the engine.
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Last edited by TrueBlue; 10-19-2007 at 03:54 PM. Reason: spelling/typos
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Old 10-19-2007
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TrueBlue,

I agree, I prefer to winterize while still in the water too. All around, it's just a lot easier.

That sounds like a good method you used when your boat was hauled out, but I would have thought it unnecessary for a "fresh water cooled" engine (by which I assume we both mean an engine equipped with a heat exchanger). On our boat at least (Yanmar 3GM30F), the thermostat is not in the raw water/heat exchanger loop, but rather is in the closed "fresh water" side of the cooling system which already contains antifreeze. So it's not necessary on our boat to warm the engine up in order to get the winterizing antifreeze fully into the raw water system.

Does your boat have a thermostat in the raw water side of the cooling system? That seems improbable, but who knows? Certainly no harm in doing it the way you described, but I'm wondering was it necessary? Perhaps I've missed something...
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Old 10-20-2007
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http://www.ays.com/library/Universal_Manual_2.pdf

Winter storage starting on pg 17 for fresh and sea water cooled engines. Cooling system arrangements starting on pg 36. If the cooling system arrangement looks the same on the Yanmar, the winterization process should be the same, yes?

This has me scratching my head. If you winterize the engine before haul out, how do you move the boat to the lift? What am I missing?
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Last edited by CapnHand; 10-20-2007 at 10:18 AM.
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Old 10-20-2007
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John - You're correct regarding thermostat location, but I wasn't taking any chances with the new-to-me boat. My last boat did not have a heat exchanger and was raw water cooled . . . this stubborn old dog can't be taught new tricks I suppose.

I neglected to mention that the real reason for running the engine to normal operating temp, was to fully warm the oil for draining and replacement with fresh oil. I prefer to do this during layup to eliminate most of the sulphuric acid, formed from the sulphur which is present in oil and in the diesel exhaust . . . not especially good for your engine.

Of course, engine pencil zinc anodes are also changed along with oil and fuel primary/secondary filters - naturally, before filling the crankcase with new oil. Biocide added to fuel tanks, electrical connections cleaned and sprayed, battery electrolyte topped off . . . etc.

But now I'm wandering into other boat winterization topics - perhaps more info than the OP asked for.
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