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rrgane 10-28-2007 07:46 PM

kerosene stoves.. WHAT HAPPENED!
 
So i am about to drop a real stove in my Islander 29 (up till now it has had only a little camping butane) and i was adamant that it was to be a kerosene stove, preferably w/oven... the reason being, although i plan on quiting, i smoke and propane scares the daylights out of me, and i like to eat the same day that i start to cook .. so alcohol is out.

so i go surfing, and everything .. EVERYTHING is propane..

WHY???

are we such an MTV society that the 2 minute priming time is just so unacceptable?

the only options it seems i have are Wallas (insanely high priced) or Dickinsen (insanely heavy and not exactly light on the pocket book either).


WHAT HAPPENED??

Morgan3820 10-28-2007 08:00 PM

I had one along with a Force 10 kero heater. I wouldn't say that I hated them But the preheat thing got old after awhile (particularly if it flared up) and there is an odor. I'm installing a propane heater and stove in my new boat

KeelHaulin 10-28-2007 08:32 PM

with proper detectors/alarms/install you should not have any trouble with a propane system. If there is enough propane in your boat for you to go kaboom while you are smoking; it definitely should have been sensed by the alarm or you would have smelled it before lighting the match. Another option is compressed natural gas (CNG) as it is lighter than air than propane; conversion to CNG is pretty easy on most new stoves. The blue water cruiser's choice would be alcohol because you can get it almost anywhere (or possibly make it yourself if in a pinch).

JMHO/HTH...

Faster 10-28-2007 08:56 PM

If you truly don't want the propane issues to deal with, our experience with alcohol (10 yrs with a pressurized version) is that the slow cooking is true, but not as big a deal as you might think and can be planned around to some extent.

The preheat and the fumes of that operation were the biggest turn offs, along with the rising cost of the high grade alcohol for the pressurized stove.

The Origo wick style alcohol stoves do away with that, being able to burn cheap methyl hydrate.

But with caution and good procedures, propane is a much better, more efficient and economical system, and we have no desire to go back to alcohol.

Trekka 10-30-2007 03:30 AM

I had a kero stove for 20 yrs. Was an Optimus self priming, so no alcohol needed. But then I bought a boat with propane stove & oven. It's really the way to go. So much easier and less odor, no spills. The safety procedures and gear, like sniffers and solenoid shut-offs are so well developed there is no need for worry as long as you use them. Just do it. You won't look back.

dsmylie 10-30-2007 07:40 AM

I switched from propane to non-presurized alcohol and have noticed no appreciable difference in cooking time. Alcohol is very simple to use. I just did not want the expense and hassel of doing propane the right way and have been very happy with my decision.

JohnRPollard 10-30-2007 07:56 AM

RRgane,

If you are set on a kerosene unit, I would highly recommend the Taylors. Taylor is out of the UK, and there they call them "parrafin" rather than kerosene stoves. That might help your internet search. We had the -030 Cooker (which has two stove burners and an oven) for many years and it is a very nice unit. I mentioned in another recent thread that the heavy guage brass and stainless metal, as well as the enameled cook top are beautiful, and can almost double as a cabin heater (but it's not vented outside the cabin like a proper heater would be so you'd want to limit your operating time.)

But be prepared for sticker shock if you get a Taylor, even the little -030 Cooker. They are among the best boat stoves made, and they don't come cheap.

All that said, we now have a propane stove/oven and I wouldn't go back. It's just too easy and clean compered to kerosene (parrafin). No pre-heating, no odor, no residue, etc. But to each their own...

TrueBlue 10-30-2007 08:23 AM

Common sense is what is declining in regards to onboard cooking, not the use of kerosene.

There will always be a group of boaters who defend whatever system they currently have, ignorant to the attributes of propane. This group seems to enjoy repeating the Chicken-Little rants they hear concerning the lack of LPG safety, inevitable doom and impending disaster. Quite frankly, these rants are very boring and tiring.

Any sailor with experience using a proper LPG cooking system in their galley, will dispel these claims as myth. The convenience and efficiency of gas cooking is unmatched by anything else.

SEMIJim 10-30-2007 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrueBlue (Post 214268)
Common sense is what is declining in regards to onboard cooking, not the use of kerosene.

There will always be a group of boaters who defend whatever system they currently have, ignorant to the attributes of propane.

God knows any disagreement can't possibly be born of honest disagreement, based on an individual having studied the pros and cons of various options, weighing their own likes and dislikes, evaluating their own needs and making an informed decision. :rolleyes:

Jim

TrueBlue 10-30-2007 08:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SEMIJim (Post 214274)
God knows any disagreement can't possibly be born of honest disagreement, based on an individual having studied the pros and cons of various options, weighing their own likes and dislikes, evaluating their own needs and making an informed decision. :rolleyes:

Jim

I will take that comment as a support of my views Jim. :rolleyes:

You obviously are aware that my post was directed to the OP's determination to have no other cooking appliance on his boat, than kerosene.


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