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  #1  
Old 11-02-2007
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Diesel Winterizing Question

First boat, first time putting it up on the hard for the winter. I know I need to do a last oil change with a warm engine, but at what point do you all do that? While it is still in the water or when it is up on stands?

In the water would be easiest, of course. But I have to motor up to the place I'll be putting her up and leaving it for them to haul out. I could change it after I motor up, but then the yard will probably run the engine some to haul it, I guess. Will that contaminate the new oil too much?

If I wait to warm it up on land, how much water will I need to feed a Yanmar 2GM20 until it is warm? Or is it crazy to even consider running it up on the stands?

Thanks.

Tom
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Old 11-02-2007
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Arf145,

You want to change the oil while the boat is still in the water. Warm up the engine, shut it down, pump out the old oil (through the dipstick opening), change the oil filter, add new oil, then take the boat for a nice run under power to fully circulate the fresh oil. If you have to start the engine again to move it for haulout, it will not harm anything. The idea is to get the old dirty oil out of the engine before lay-up.

You did not say whether your engine is raw water cooled or has a heat exchanger. In either case, you have to winterize that part of the system also, but the procedure is different depending on how the engine is cooled. Again, this is easier to do when the boat is in the water.

Some people add a stabilizer to the oil/crank case before lay-up, as well as to the fuel. There's debate about the necessity of doing so but I've never heard that it harms anything.
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Old 11-03-2007
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OK--that's good news. I'll change it when I get to the winter marina. I've already changed the oil once and have the fantastic Pella oil extractor to assist. Love that thing.

Now about the heat exchanger. It's a freshwater cooled system, so I need to take care of the water in the raw side. The Yanmar manual describes this as a draining procedure:
* open drain on underside of the exhaust manifold end cap, drain and close
* drain the water in the seawater pump by loosening the cover (I'll be putting in a new impeller in the spring, so I'm not worried about the one in there)
* remove lower ends of coolling hoses from the pump and exhaust to drain, then refit.
* Does something need to be done to the sea strainer?

Or should I fill the seawater side with non-toxic antifreeze? I've think I've read of folks just sucking non-toxic antifreeze into the seawater side by pulling the hose off the intake seacock and cranking the engine. Is this better than draining?

Thanks as always to all of you for letting me tap into your knowledge and experience--like a parasite at this point I'm afraid.

Tom
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I think most folks use the non-toxic anti-freeze method. With a fesh water cooled system (i.e. heat exchanger) it's a pretty simple matter to pump some through just before haul out. It can even be done on the hard after haul-out, but I prefer to get it all done while in the water, along with the oil etc. Can your marina tow you to the travel-lift, or do you have to motor up to it? If you have to motor yourself to the travel-lift, just get the anti-freeze ready to go and hopefully they'll let you do it right there while they're getting the slings set-up.
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Do the oil change when in the water just before hauling. It will not matter that it is run for a while with the new oil before hauling.

For those tempted to run the engine when out of the water, be very wary of connecting a hose to the intake. If you leave the hose on for any reason with motor off, you will fill the motor and exhaust to the brim.

As an alternative, get a bucket, and let the engine draw its own cooling water out of it. Top the bucket up with the hose.
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Hello,

As written, you should change the oil when the boat is in the water. It's a lot easier to get the engine up to temperature with the boat in the water, motoring around for a 15 -20 minutes.

I winterize the raw water system with the boat on the hard. I remove the raw water hose from the engine (because it's easy on my boat) and run a new hose from the bottle of antifreeze (the non toxic, marine / RV stuff) to the raw water pump. I start the engine and watch the exhaust. When it turns pink I shut the engine down, as the raw water is not full of antifreeze. I drain the water lift muffer (because it's easy) and that's it for the engine.

Barry
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Old 11-03-2007
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Put oil soaked rags in the air intake and exhaust outlets also, keeps out critters and absorbs any wind blown dust/debris that comes that way.
BoatUS has a good winterization list on their website - follow it for everything that pertains to your boat and you'll have a long and happy relationship with your boat.
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Old 11-04-2007
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You really should fog the engine as well, by cranking it with the decompression switch on...
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucklesR View Post
Put oil soaked rags in the air intake and exhaust outlets also, keeps out critters and absorbs any wind blown dust/debris that comes that way.
BoatUS has a good winterization list on their website - follow it for everything that pertains to your boat and you'll have a long and happy relationship with your boat.
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Old 11-04-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockter View Post
Do the oil change when in the water just before hauling. It will not matter that it is run for a while with the new oil before hauling.

For those tempted to run the engine when out of the water, be very wary of connecting a hose to the intake. If you leave the hose on for any reason with motor off, you will fill the motor and exhaust to the brim.

As an alternative, get a bucket, and let the engine draw its own cooling water out of it. Top the bucket up with the hose.
Voice of experience: Never Ever hook pressure water to the raw water intake. You are asking for trouble. Use the bucket method described above. The other thing is to drain your seacocks after haul-out. The ball valves will hold fresh water in them, and will freeze and break. I did that one too. (not too smart some days........)
DD
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Old 11-04-2007
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How do you fog a diesel? I guess you could crank it by hand but I would be worried it would fire up if it was still warm.
Before do anything on the diesel like shutting the seacock or putting rags in the intake I take ALL of the keys and wire/tie/tape them to whatever I did. Some of us have short memories
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