Shrink wrap vs. Tarp - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #11  
Old 11-05-2007
BarryL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,538
Thanks: 3
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 11
BarryL is on a distinguished road
Hello,

I had my 28' boat shrink wrapped over the winter for the last 3 years. The cost was about $350 for everything - they build the frame, shrink wrap the boat, install vents, and a door.

I was very, very happy with shrink wrapping. The vents allow plenty of ventilation and the boat stayed very dry. The white plastic even allowed enough light through for a solar battery charger, left sitting on the deck, to keep the batteries charged.

My new boat (35') came with a winter cover. It's 3 large pieces of canvas type stuff. My boat is now out of the water and in the yard. When I finish a few winterization tasks I'm going to try and cover the boat. The cover was made for mast up storage, and my mast is off the boat, so it will be interesting to see if I can make the cover work. If not. I will call the shrink wrap place right away.

In the yard I use, it's about 50 / 50 between shrink wrapped and tarps / over covers. I can tell you that at least 50% of the tarps, etc. don't make it through the winter. If you go down to the yard after a big storm, you will see lots of covers blowing around, doing a significant amount of damage. Last year I thought one guy was constructing a building around his boat! First good storm and it looked like the big bad wolf huffed and puffed and blew down his stick building. I have never seen a shrink wrapped boat have problems.

Anyway, it's up to you, if you cover it yourself, be careful in how you tie it down - don't go to the boat stands, don't let the cover chafe on the hull, don't let the frame fall down, etc.

Barry
__________________
Barry Lenoble
Day To Remember, 1986 O'day 35 For Sale
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110 For Sail
Mt. Sinai, NY

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 11-05-2007
mstern's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 625
Thanks: 4
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 12
mstern is on a distinguished road
I have tried both methods, and IMHO you either need to devote too much money or lots of labor/time to get a tarp/frame that is better than shrink wrap. As noted elsewhere in this thread, a custom canvas tarp is going to cost thousands; even more if you want them to build you a reusable frame too. Of course you don't need to pay this kind of money. You can build a nice frame yourself and cover it with cheaper tarps that will last a season or three.

I copied an idea I saw somewhere on the web on building a PVC pipe frame for my boat. Covered it with a hardware store tarp myself. Total time spent: about 8 hours. Total cost for materials: about $75. It lasted about a week before the PVC frame broke. I spent another few hours fixing that first break with wood and duct tape. It broke again and again. I finally gave up trying to fix it. The mangled mess still kept most of the snow off her. I realized that I would need a much stronger frame. I designed one, only to realize that I really didn't have the time to make it. It would have taken me probably two whole days (most likely a skilled carpenter could have knocked it off in a few hours). I just don't have that kind of time to devote to the boat. So, every year now I pony up a few hundred bucks to have my boat shrinkwrapped. I don't have the moisture/condensation problems that others here have described. Vents and well-placed openings around the stern pulpit keep air moving. I don't like the expense, but my alternatives are to buy a cover that cost more than the boat, or devote time that I don't have. Not much of a choice.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 11-05-2007
christyleigh's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: North Brookfield, Mass.
Posts: 935
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
christyleigh is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryL View Post
My new boat (35') came with a winter cover. It's 3 large pieces of canvas type stuff. My boat is now out of the water and in the yard. When I finish a few winterization tasks I'm going to try and cover the boat. The cover was made for mast up storage, and my mast is off the boat, so it will be interesting to see if I can make the cover work.
Barry,
The Fairclough 'mast up' covers have very good cinching turtlenecks at the mast and the shroud exits. I have stored with the mast down when I had mine and simply cinched up those turtlenecks and only got a few drops of water in.
__________________
Stan
'Christy Leigh'
NC 331
Wickford/Narragansett Bay RI
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 11-05-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
One caveat that hasn't been mentioned here yet. If your boat is painted, especially with Awlgrip— DO NOT LET THE SHRINK WRAP TOUCH THE PAINTED SURFACE FOR ANY EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME. If the shrink wrap remains in contact with the painted surface, there's a really good chance you'll get some nice bubbling of the paint.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 11-05-2007
labatt's Avatar
I'd rather be sailing
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: The state of s/v/ Pelican
Posts: 1,901
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
labatt will become famous soon enough
I forgot to mention - I would be using the inexpensive $100-$200 type of synthetic tarp - not the multi-thousand custom tarp. We've already built a great frame - 1" electrical conduit and a pipe bender worked wonderfully. Since we'll be selling the boat next year, we don't want to invest in a custom cover - we will never get our money back for it. My concern about the inexpensive tarps was their potential abrasiveness against parts of the boat as the wind comes up and under and shakes the tarp. There is no way to stop this from happening. I felt shrink wrap would not do the same thing.

SD - I have no idea if my hull is painted. If it was, then it was many many years ago. I'm assuming it's just gelcoat.
__________________
s/v "Pelican" Passport 40 #076- Finished Cruising - for the moment -
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
"Don't dream your life, live your dream" - Bob Bitchin'
"I'll see it when I believe it" - Me
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 11-05-2007
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 83
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
saltypat is an unknown quantity at this point
West marine tarps?

I am keeping my Ches. Bay sailboat in the water this year. I bought 2 10 by 15 tarps from West Marine.

We don't get much snow, so my idea is to put these over the boat and tie to the rub rail which is metal and easy to tie to.

I am trying to keep the teak somewhat protected, and the boat dryer.

They seem a bit like heavy reinforced plastic, silver in color.

If they don't last through a heavy blow I am only out $25 apiece.

I am wondering if I am seriously doomed for failure, and if anyone else has used these inexpensive tarps.

Thanks, SaltyPat
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 11-05-2007
Freesail99's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,507
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Freesail99 will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to Freesail99
The inexpensive tarps I used last year where bought from Harbor Freight. They were on sale and very cheap. I bought 3 times the amount that I needed. I may have spent as little as $5.00 each. I used last years tarp to wrap my mast. Fresh tarps bought last year will be used on the boat, this year. I tie them down around the bottom of the boat and not to the rub rail.
__________________
S/V Scheherazade
-----------------------
I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 11-05-2007
pegasus1457's Avatar
Arf!
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 609
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
pegasus1457 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
We purchased a heavy-duty tarp from Harbor Freight and we're going to build a frame out of 6" dia. PVC (for the spine) and the heavier-duty sprinkler system pipe tie-wrapped to the stanchions. The advantage to the sprinkler system pipe is it's pre-curved. Saw two other boats doing this yesterday. If you put the spine up high enough, you can get the sprinkler pipe to curve right to the top of the stanchions, thus eliminating them as a trouble spot or having to remove them. Also: If you build the thing high enough, you can work in there in the winter. Or just hang out .

I haven't decided what I'm going to use to elevate the spine. It seems everybody else uses wood. I'm wondering if using the same PVC as the spine, or maybe 4" dia., slotted into the spine with T-fittings, and with the bases also formed of 4" PVC with T-fittings, might not work better? The only thing is the potential added expense.

Jim
I did this for a couple of seasons, but have given it up for a [better] method. What I did not like about the heavy sprinkler tubing is that the pieces you need to span an 8.5' beam are really unwieldy to transport from the boatyard to the house. Also the only way I could fix them to the stanchions was to slide them over. Convenient? Not really, because I had to take down my lifelines But if you are going to follow this method, it is much easier to get the curvature you want after pouring some hot water into the black tubing to soften it.

My current method involves PVC plumbing tubing. I think it is 3/4 in. I cable tie these to the inside face of the stanchions, then join them into a hoop by overlapping and cable tying and using duct tape to reduce wear on the tarp. The spine is made from lengths of 2" PVC joined together with PVC couplings and screwed together. It is inside the hoops and connected to them by duct tape. It is there only to keep the hoops from moving, not to support any weight. The spine is supported by the bow pulpit and 2 wooden fixtures with carpeting underneath to protect the deck.

The advantage of either method is that the tarp is forced into a convex shape so that it does not form pockets to collect snow or water.

Finally, to hold the whole thing together, I use tarp grabbers (not the grommets) to gather in several thicknesses of tarp, joined under the hull using bungees and rope. Each connection has one bungee even though there may be some rope at either end. This is more effective than trying to tie it up tight or using antifreeze gallon jugs or ... It works well because when a gust of wind hits the tarp the bungees yield a bit, relieving the stress that would have ripped out the grommet or tarp grabber. Last year I did not have to retie anything. For me that was a first.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 11-05-2007
AjariBonten's Avatar
Aquaholic
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Fingerlakes & Great Lakes New York
Posts: 1,139
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
AjariBonten is on a distinguished road
Thanks Jim, That's what I was pretty much gonna say.
I think that the average job of shrink-wrapping may do more harm than good.

A well done tarp arrangement can be a lot better than a poor wrapping job; and visa-versa.

I don't know about other places, but there was a big push in DownEast Maine a few years ago to sell the shrink-wrapping equipment as a quick money/low investment scheme; therefore there are a LOT of low skill shoddy/workmanship "wrappers" around.



Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
I suspect what Ajari was suggesting was the difference between vented and un-vented coverings, not covering vs. no covering.

Jim

TB, I wasn't suggesting leaving a boat un-covered, though I may have been rather unclear about that. I was suggesting wha tI just explained above; but was rushed. I should never post in a hurry................
__________________
I got an Old Fat Boat
She's Slow But Handsome
Hard In The Chine, but Soft In The Transom
I Love Her Well, And She Must Love Me
But I think It's Only For My Money
.
..... Gordon Bok

Last edited by AjariBonten; 11-05-2007 at 01:56 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 11-05-2007
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
You also want to make sure the overlap point is well secured so that snow/wind/ice/rain doesn't find it way through there.
Prevailing winds play a role here. I have my tarp opening like a tent flap tied at the aft end of the boat, and I frequently tried to have my stern pointed south or south east, as this is the least likely direction locally from which freezing rain/snow/blizzard will arrive. Also having the boat pointing into the prevailing winds makes chafe less of an issue.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
shrink wrap NewsReader Mass Bay Sailors 2 05-05-2011 11:10 PM
Re: shrink wrap Lloyd's Marine Service in Winthrop NewsReader Mass Bay Sailors 0 01-16-2007 09:15 AM
shrink wrap Lloyd's Marine Service in Winthrop NewsReader Mass Bay Sailors 0 01-15-2007 07:15 PM
Shrink Wrap or Custom Cover? tomgee Gear & Maintenance 7 12-06-2006 09:30 PM
shrink wrap VS. no cover ddilman Gear & Maintenance 6 11-15-2006 10:28 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:53 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012