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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 11-05-2007
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Maintenance before rig is back on? before we splash her?

As some of you already know, we bought on the east coast and our boat is currently in transit to the local boatyard in Seattle (I believe in Montana right now.. )

What am I going to regret not doing before the rig is put up?

Scheduling may dictate the sequence of events, but ideally before we step the mast, what should we have done?

One chainplate leaks, so we know we need to rebed them all. Seems like it might be easier with the rig down, but then it won't be under load, so that may affect things. I expect this stuff has to cure too, so we might want the nice weather to get the rig on and wait for a later weather window to do the chainplates.

What am I going to regret not getting done while she is on the hard?

There is some engine work a pro will be doing, which involves pulling the shaft. We will be greasing the max prop, unseizing all the ball valves (hopefully just greasing and not replacing).

Do we need to put the sales up in the yard, or should we do that once the boat is in the water? We will be taking the old name off while on the hard, and doing a bunch of cleaning. The bottom paint is new, so we will just be touching up that.

Last edited by paul77; 11-05-2007 at 04:41 PM.
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Old 11-05-2007
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You are correct to put another coat on the bottom paint, because it will dry out on the trip and lose its usefulness.
write down the correct anode sizes while its out of the water. It might be worthwhile to buy the entire grease kit from Max Prop now.
No need to raise the sails while on the hard
here is a list of what I did or wish I had done while my mast was down.
replace halyards, check sheaves; if you have wire halyards and are thinking about replacing with line, you have to replace the sheaves.
If there is room to add a spare halyard do it.
examine the lights, make sure they are in good condition, corrosion cleaned off, lenses okay, test to make sure they work and bulbs are all good. Write down the specs on the bulbs and buy spares.
Test your mast antenna, and the cable. Shakespeare makes a tester.
obviously have someone check the standing rigging to make sure its all okay.
If you plan to add an SSB and there is no provision for antenna, either add insulators to the backstay or figure out another antenna.
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Old 11-05-2007
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Taking the chainplates off and inspecting them, then replacing them if necessary and re-bedding them is a very good idea. If your boat is more than 10 years old or so, it would be highly recommended.

Checking the mast compression post, if the mast is deck-stepped and repairing any problems with it would also be an excellent idea. If the mast is keel-stepped, then checking the deck opening, mast partners, and mast step would be a good idea.

If the boat is an older one...having a rigger out to check the standing and running rigging and do any replacing of those bit as needed would be a good idea prior to stepping the mast. The masthead sheaves and exit slots should get extra attention if the boat was formerly wire-to-rope on the running rigging and has been converted or is going to be converted to all-rope.

If you want to add lazy jacks or some other mainsail handling system, it might be wise to modify the boom and mast while they're off the boat.

If you're planning on adding, upgrading or replacing any of the running lights or instruments on the mast, it would be a good idea to do that while it's down. I have an LED-based tricolor/anchor light, and would highly recommend them to anyone with a sailboat. Adding spreader lights or flag halyards is also a lot easier with the mast down.

I hope this helps.
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Old 11-05-2007
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Quote:
unseizing all the ball valves (hopefully just greasing and not replacing).
There is a small nut about 180 degrees from the handle loosen it and you may find your ball valves working fine once again.
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Old 11-05-2007
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I would actually replace the mast lights and keep the ones that are installed as spares. Remove the spreader boots, check for corrosion around where the standing rigging goes through the spreaders, and replace the boots if necessary. I used the Edson leather boots - they are not cheap, but are a lot nicer than the current alternatives on the market. If your mast is keel stepped, you may want to look at the shape of the mast boot and look at some of the products on the market in that area. Inspect the mast for any signs of paint flaking as this may be a lead-in to corrosion. Also look at attachment points of dissimilar metals for possible corrosion. Dohenyboy covered most of the other areas already.
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Labatt-

I'm not a big fan of spreader boots, since they help trap moisture against the rigging and can accelerate the corrosion process. I'm not a fan of taping cotter pins either.

Also, many masts aren't painted...but inspecting the mast where it passes through the deck is a very good idea.

One other thing I'd add to the list... replace any seacocks that are gate valve designs. You really want to have ball-valve or tapered-cone valve type seacocks on the boat.
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Old 11-05-2007
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SD - I don't disagree on the spreader boots. The Edson design is kind of nice. It's a leather boot that has holes pre-punched. It comes with thick waxy thread. You put the boots on and then stitch them up, but they let plenty of air through. They aren't like those molded plastic ones that get taped on and close the spreader tips to any oxygen (and the stainless steel rigging along with them). We'll probably have our rig down in the spring again (IF we buy the HR53 and IF Pelican doesn't sell over the Winter) and I'll take some pictures. I think they are a nice compromise of looks vs. function.
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Old 11-05-2007
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Cool! Thanks for the advice..

It is a hylas 46, has a keel stepped mast. The boot needed replacement anyways, so we will be replacing it. I believe all halyards are line. Both main and secondary are furling, main is electric furl.

The mast is just aluminum and not painted.

Spreaders were removed from the mast, I didn't see our spreader boots but the rigging company did all this work before we did the final packing. I will have to look up pics to see if we had any.

Boat already has an SSB, we need to get our ham licenses

An LED Tricolor would be cool, but we need to budget for other upgrades.
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Old 11-05-2007
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Check the sheaves in the masthead, check the bearing pins that run them.

Check the main track for deformations and burs.

Check all lights and redo wiring if it needs it. Is the wiring properly plated stuff or just copper?

Add any flag halyard blocks to the spreaders that you might want or whatever else goes "up there"...

If you want to add cages to rpotect your steaming light from being beaten by a flapping headsail...now is a good time to add those.

LED lights for the masthead are getting really cheap and are well worth the effort. A masthead anchor light with LED's is an especially good idea.

Check check and really check the rudder while the boat is out of the water and before you add more paint. IS the rudder skin cracked at any point around its join...It usually happens right up top just under the hull. Check the cutless bearing as well...there will never be a better time!


Sasha
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Old 11-05-2007
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If you already have all electrical and electronic gear mounted that you want (spreader lights/foredeck light etc etc) then I would consider mounting 2 steps about 4' below the mast head. That way you stand up and stretch yoru legs a little while you're up there (and you will be for something) Also take this time to set up your wiring connections at the base of the mast so that they are dry by design and easily disconnected/reconnected.

That's a nice boat, enjoy it!
Ike
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