Installing a windlass on a curved deck with base - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 15 Old 11-09-2007 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Deep Cove, North Van, BC
Posts: 128
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Installing a windlass on a curved deck with base

I spotted the article here on installing windlass's and I thought eureka, I finally have found a solution, but alas no. I am installing a manual windlass and have a slight curve to my Catalina (75) 27 foot foredeck. I need to add a base for some needed height for effective operation of the windlass. The base is the problem, how do I get a gentle curve into it to reflect the curve of the deck? What kind of carpentry do I do to add the curve to the bottom of the teak?
rsn48 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Senior Member
 
Valiente's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Why not make the base out of something like a HDPE cutting board? You can heat it in a low oven and bend it to shape.
Valiente is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Señor Member
 
TrueBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
     
I laminated two eight-quarter thick teak planks together, to get the required height for running a chain rode at the correct angle to my bulwark-mounted anchor roller.

I then vertcally shaped the block to the windlass base's contour, using a band saw. All shaping of the block base to conform to the deck contour, was done by hand - using a convex shaped block plane. It's worked great without any issues for the past 3 seasons.

True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
TrueBlue is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Another, simpler way, to do this is to use a fiberglass/thickened epoxy base. There was a good article on doing this on the West Systems website IIRC.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Aquaholic
 
AjariBonten's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Fingerlakes & Great Lakes New York
Posts: 1,139
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
 
If the curve is gentle enough; that is definitely the way to go.....


Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Another, simpler way, to do this is to use a fiberglass/thickened epoxy base. There was a good article on doing this on the West Systems website IIRC.

I got an Old Fat Boat
She's Slow But Handsome
Hard In The Chine, but Soft In The Transom
I Love Her Well, And She Must Love Me
But I think It's Only For My Money
.
..... Gordon Bok
AjariBonten is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Curving wood bases

The way to do this with a wood base is to make the piece with a flat bottom, place it on the deck with wedges or other supports to get it level athwartship and fore and aft. After it is blocked in place use a pencil on the deck to draw the curve and any angles around the perimeter. That is the material that needs to be removed. If a pencil laying on the deck is not tall enough to touch the base all the way around, tape it to a block of wood to raise it to an adequate level. What tools you need to use depends on the size of the base and your skills. A bandsaw would probably be my first choice following that with planes and rasps but you could simply use a belt sander for the whole job if you're careful.
SteveCox is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Making an epoxy base is just a lot faster and simpler... since you can actually use the existing surface to mold the base. You can also use the base of the windlass to make the top portion of the epoxy base, leaving it a very strong custom fit. This is especially true if the surface in question has compound curves, which are very difficult to work into a wooden base.

Also, a properly made epoxy-fiberglass base is going to be far lower maintenance than a teak base would be over the years. Personally, I'm more interested in sailing my boat, than varishing the wood work on it.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Señor Member
 
TrueBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveCox View Post
The way to do this with a wood base is to make the piece with a flat bottom, place it on the deck with wedges or other supports to get it level athwartship and fore and aft. After it is blocked in place use a pencil on the deck to draw the curve and any angles around the perimeter. That is the material that needs to be removed. If a pencil laying on the deck is not tall enough to touch the base all the way around, tape it to a block of wood to raise it to an adequate level. What tools you need to use depends on the size of the base and your skills. A bandsaw would probably be my first choice following that with planes and rasps but you could simply use a belt sander for the whole job if you're careful.
I used a compass (circle drawing type) opened wide enough to span the gap atwartships of the block straddling the deck's crown. This is just one method of transferring a surface profile to the workpiece. In my deck, there was only a disparity of about 3/16" - at the most, between high and low points on the block.

True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
TrueBlue is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 15 Old 11-09-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
The compass method works but if you don't hold it at the same angle all the time it can throw your measurements off. I like the block of wood flat on the deck method better as it is harder to make a mistake. Also, almost anyone, anywhere can come up with a small block of wood, some tape and a pencil. I hate it when I'm somewhere and I need a tool and it happens to be back in my shop.
SteveCox is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 15 Old 11-10-2007 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Deep Cove, North Van, BC
Posts: 128
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
To get the arc of the deck, I was going to use one of those tools that has thousands of little spikes and you press down on it and the spikes move into the shape of that which it is pressed against; this struck me as the lazest way.

The epoxy base sounds interesting but also as much of a challenge unless I am misunderstanding how it is used. Do you make something like a ground meat patty and lay it down with the windlass on top, how do you do it?
rsn48 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing an anchor windlass GoodOldBoat Good Old Boat 9 05-23-2015 05:53 PM
Installing an anchor windlass GoodOldBoat Good Old Boat 2 06-05-2013 10:10 PM
Choosing and Installing an Electric Windlass Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 09-06-2002 08:00 PM
The Great Windlass Debate SailNet Seamanship Articles 0 11-30-2001 07:00 PM
The Great Windlass Debate SailNet Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 11-30-2001 07:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome