teak or stainless??? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 11-17-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
jdair101 is on a distinguished road
teak or stainless???

Hi All
I have removed my weathered teak cabin top grab rails and can't decide to replace them with teak or stainless. My boat is a 1984 c&c 27 mkv and the spread for the mounting points is not "standard" so custom teak or stainless have to be made to replace them.
So---- what would you replace yours with if it was you???
And---where would you get them from???

Thanks
Jim
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 11-17-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
If you have a friend that does wood work, then teak would be the way to go. If you have to buy them custom made... you could go either way. I would go with stainless steel for two reasons—first, they're stronger, second they're lower maintenance.

It would help if you posted a photo of the cabintop. It would also help if you said where you and the boat were located, since a stainless steel fabricator may be local to you.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 11-17-2007
teshannon's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 2,713
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
teshannon has a spectacular aura about teshannon has a spectacular aura about teshannon has a spectacular aura about
To me teak has a much better look and should be strong enough. On the other hand if you have no other teak outside then it really doesn't matter which way you go.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 11-17-2007
Omatako's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,449
Thanks: 0
Thanked 30 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Omatako will become famous soon enough
The mantenance level of teak depends on whether you varnish/oil or not. Naked teak is pretty maintenance free.

Stainless is harder to hold on to (slippery) but will shrug of that emergency little tie that you want to put on to it and won't sustian damage.

My rails are low down and are of little value unless you're crawling so I prefer stainless but the rest of the boat's trim would be a determining factor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 11-17-2007
.
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 10,851
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Here, is one of the items where I am most critical.

No matter how it looks and how safe it is. Cabin top rails IN MY BOATS are allways satinless steel.

I do love teak, I think its pretty and would look good....on other people's boats. Not on mine.

I believe that the cabin rails should be strong, they are the only STEADY safe feature for you to grab for dear life, it has to be strong if you need to attach a dinghy, or to grab someone that went overboard.

Mine are not only SS they are properly fitted with backing plates and are very strong. Its the rail of life, the real one.

No fancy wood for me there, no matter how you guys say its strong and safe. Its wood, it cracks, it rots it fails!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 11-17-2007
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 15,330
Thanks: 88
Thanked 242 Times in 233 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
On the C&C27 MkV there won't be a lot of teak elsewhere on deck. I'd be very tempted to go with stainless steel for the various reasons cited above.

Not everyone likes the weathered teak look, and the upkeep on handrails in particular can be onerous.

One more thought - our boat has stainless rails, and the manufacturer left them open at the ends... each can naturally lead a line from foredeck to cabin top aft. We have a downhaul through one rail and will soon have the furler line through the other. This is a typical Nicholson tactic... makes a lot of sense.

in the pic below you can see the aft end of what I mean.. portside the rail is used, to starboard you can see the end of the empty rail. They lead right down over the cabin to deck level forward.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 11-17-2007
JohnRPollard's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 10
JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough JohnRPollard is a jewel in the rough
Jdair,

As long as you have the handrails off, you could make a slight modification that would facilitate refinishing teak in the future. Instead of re-attaching a standard teak handrail with curved arches that land in teak bases that get attached flush to the cabin top, you might consider affixing some pads at the attachment points and then have a straight length of teak that mounts to the pads and which can easily be romoved for re-finishing. After that run-on sentence, I think you'll agree it's harder to explain than to show:


Pacific Seacraft 40

Of course, in the photo above this was incorporated into the design at the outset, but there's no reason it couldn't be retro-fitted. Spacing of the original mounts becomes irrelevant with this approach.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 11-17-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,284
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Rockter will become famous soon enough
Here are mine...

http://s217.photobucket.com/albums/c...Summer2007.jpg

They don't look as strong as stainless would be perhaps.

Rockter
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 11-17-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 501
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 14
Quickstep192 is on a distinguished road
My boat is lavished with teak. I just got the estimate to re-do all of it. Once the paramedics got done reviving me, I realized how terrible it looks after several years of neglect. I love the look of a boat with traditional lines and lots of teak. My next boat will have little or no exterior teak.......

My handrails are pretty much to low to be of any use, but Giu is right; you don't want that thing snapping when you need it most. I've seen rails made of composite. Maybe that's a happy medium?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 11-17-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Most composites aren't strong enough IMHO to work as hand rails. Stainless steel is probably the best way to go.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stainless 101 sailnaway Gear & Maintenance 2 01-28-2005 06:02 AM
Techniques for Removing Teak Decks Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 11-24-2003 08:00 PM
Reducing Exterior Maintenance Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-15-2003 09:00 PM
Homemade Teak Decks SailNet Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-01-2002 09:00 PM
Bristol Teak Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 11-02-1999 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:08 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.