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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #21  
Old 01-04-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timebandit
I use an electric vest on the bike and on the boat. It's is just like getting inside a toaster. I have had it soaked in rain water and it worked fine. It is 12 volt and you need a thermostat controller or you will be turning it on and off.
The vest it self is made with thinsulate and is warm by itself.
I wear pollypropolene long underwear next to my skin, vest, light wool sweater and my leathers.
On the boat if I get a chill I just put it on and in just a jiffy I am warm. I am not sure what salt water will do.
I've heard that about the heated clothing, that it is incredibly warm. I know on my old bike that I got caught out a few times in cold weather without the right clothing and I wished I had some of that heated stuff to wear.

As far as salt water is concerned, one vendor site I read said that water didn't hurt the clothing because it was some kind of special plastic covered wire, I don't know, probably just marketing hype, but they did mention it in reference to sailing. Probably the hardest part would be bringing a 12vdc plug out to the cockpit to plug into and not getting it tangled up in lines.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ekotopia View Post
Hi there, I just heard from a motor cycle guy - that there are suits with 12 volt hook-up. that warms U up almost instantly. Would be a good idea to have under the foulies- unless thinking of moving around a lot ( dancing etc )
Cheers
I think I am going to order some heated clothing and see if it'll work for me. Can't hurt to try, doesn't even cost that much really. Maybe I'll start with just a pair of socks or something, I can wear those while reading a book anyway.

Maybe I can sit and read sailnet with some warm feet.
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  #22  
Old 01-04-2008
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I had a heated vest (from a company called Eclipse IIRC) when I was riding year round. It was great under winter motorcycle gear or a snowmobile suit. The vest was plenty to keep my whole body warm. The only downsides on a boat are unplugging and plugging when you have to leave the cockpit and the power drain.

I sailed the Skagerak in April and crossed the Atlantic in May/June wearing Gill Atlantic foulies -- they have an inner jumpsuit in addition to bibs and jacket. I've been very pleased with the system.

For the innermost layer I'm a huge fan of Damart products. I was first pointed to them by a Chicago motorcycle police officer who said all his buddies wore them riding straight through Chicago winters. I carried #3 (medium) and #5 (super warm) level stuff sailing the Skagerak and then on the crossing. I never needed the #5 but I felt better knowing I had it. Damart has a very light presence in the US these days -- the last time I ordered anything it actually shipped from the UK. It is absolutely worth the hassle. No question.

Since I got back to the US and in the much more benign winters of the Chesapeake I discovered that Zippo (the lighter people) still make old fashioned fuel-powered hand warmers. I got one at a outdoor store and I'm sold. The next time I get the chance I'm getting more. On a full load of lighter fluid (3 oz?) it runs for 24 hours with a pleasant warmth. There is no open flame; it uses some kind of glassy catalyst material. Outstanding!

I also carry a box of the chemical handwarmers for guests who underestimate how cold their hands may get.
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  #23  
Old 01-04-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
I had a heated vest (from a company called Eclipse IIRC) when I was riding year round. It was great under winter motorcycle gear or a snowmobile suit. The vest was plenty to keep my whole body warm. The only downsides on a boat are unplugging and plugging when you have to leave the cockpit and the power drain.
I read up on the power drain because that is a concern of mine too, and it is certainly not non-existent. Using Gerbing as an example, they say that the socks use about 1.8 - 2.1 amps (at 12vdc'ish), pants 3.6 - 4 amps, and a vest liner uses 4.5 - 4.6. That's about 11 amps for the whole outfit, or 130 watts continuous. That's enough to be concerned about if all you had were solar panels, though it probably wouldn't be a concern at all with a wind generator in winter.

I ordered something earlier today to try it out and see how well they work.
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  #24  
Old 01-04-2008
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Staying Warm and Dry at Sea

I'd second what 'Dog' to say and add that in addition to leaving room in sizing the foulies, the same applies for boots. I have two pair -- cheapo West Marine rubber boots for summer sized to fit my bare feet as I don't need them often, and a pair of Dubarry sailing boots (not cheap) sized to fit my feet with two pair of socks for cold weather sailing. I use a thin poly-prop sock under a heavy wool sock. On my first trip north of the Arctic Circle, I had only the cheapo rubber boots and tried to keep warm with heavy socks. It didn't work for two reasons: solid rubber is a very poor thermal insulator and the tight fit caused by the heavy socks cut the circulation in my feet.

Goretex and other 'breathable' materials are definitely worth the money in both foulies and boots. I've found that if you wear 'wickable' material under non-breathing foulies you can end up getting 'wet' from the inside as the moisture wicked off the skin can't get through the waterproof layers of the the outer garmets.

If you want to stay warm and dry at sea, buy the best foulies and best boots you can afford. In my experience, it's hard to beat Henri Lloyd and Dubarry gear.
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  #25  
Old 01-04-2008
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Synthetic or wool stocking cap and socks, layers of clothing and good fowl weather gear. Keep your head and feet warm, head because it's where most heat is lost and feet because that's where it seems to hurt the most when they are cold and wet. Get stuff big so things can breath, it's air that does the insulating. I wear my life vest under the fowl weather gear, BIG, BIGGER, BIGGEST, that's best. I use wool socks and big pullover boots, use the drawstring on your hood to keep the water and breeze out. Make sure your foul weather gear is big enough to fit over your high top boots. Good waterproof gloves, again with plenty of air in them, keep your hands dry when needed, if you have to tie a knot the gloves come off, but as long as the rest of the body is warm it's OK. The old kids mitten trick with the string through the sleeves to connect them together might be good, I do add a lanyard with a loop so I can "tie" them or hook them someplace. Never went so far as to string my sleeves though. The loop, a slip knot fits around the cuff before you put them on. A woodstove in the cabin is real nice too, burning coal or wood (preferred) or even diesel. I keep a couple milk crates of kindling full from trips ashore. It doesn't take much to take the chill off a sailboat and it sure is nice to have a place to warm your hands and keep a kettle of water warm for hot chocolate.
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Last edited by jheldatksuedu; 01-04-2008 at 02:22 PM.
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  #26  
Old 01-04-2008
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Dry suit

I am an avid climber, skier, cyclist, etc. that likes to go out in all types of weather. Gore-Tex stuff is the best for a variety of reasons including, lifetime guarantee, waterproof and breathability. The problem with a lot of the lightweight Gore-tex stuff use in climbing or biking stuff is that it doesn't often do well with abrasion; which can be nemisis if you are sliding/rubbing against a deck surface on a boat. My Henri Llyod stuff is almost like pack cloth, so it is bombproof, but very heavy.

If you are going to be on-deck in nasty stuff all day, I recommend a good drysuit; specifically one designed for sea kayaking. The are very maneuverable, and waterproof. The newer models have very comfortable and waterproof punch through necks instead of latex seals and you'll have no water down the sleeve problems because of wrist seals. Almost all now come with integral WP socks. A layer or two underneath and you'll stay dry and comfy in water as low as 35 deg F.

The cost anywhere from 400 to $900, depending on gore-tex or not.

Check out NRS for models. I have one and use it all the time for both spring/fall and winter kayaking in the NOrtheast and the days where it gets crummy during an early spring or late fall sail.

Doc
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  #27  
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Keeping dry

The only thing that will keep you dry is the old fashioned yellow rubber suit.
Not the high tech and expensive wear that will only keep you dry for a few hours.

SH
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  #28  
Old 01-04-2008
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The only problem with drysuits is that they're more harder to get in and out of and make adjusting layers much more difficult.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #29  
Old 01-04-2008
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I've had all kinds of gore-tex shells over the years and eventually, out in the driving rain all day, they definitely get water-logged. PVC, even though it doesn't breathe and you soak yourself from within, is the only truly waterproof clothing I've encountered. It also drip dries in a moist environment whereas my gore-tex shells never seem to.

DrB- be careful kayaking around in a drysuit. I lost a good friend who drown in a rapid in Oregon during a swim because his drysuit's neck gasket let water in. His suit filled with water and pulled him down before anyone could lend a helping hand. After that incident everyone of us got rid of our drysuits. I don't think this would be an issue on a sailboat, though.
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Old 01-04-2008
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His drysuit's neck gasket either wasn't fitted properly or was damaged if that happened.
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulesailor View Post
I've had all kinds of gore-tex shells over the years and eventually, out in the driving rain all day, they definitely get water-logged. PVC, even though it doesn't breathe and you soak yourself from within, is the only truly waterproof clothing I've encountered. It also drip dries in a moist environment whereas my gore-tex shells never seem to.

DrB- be careful kayaking around in a drysuit. I lost a good friend who drown in a rapid in Oregon during a swim because his drysuit's neck gasket let water in. His suit filled with water and pulled him down before anyone could lend a helping hand. After that incident everyone of us got rid of our drysuits. I don't think this would be an issue on a sailboat, though.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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