Staying Warm and Dry at Sea - Page 4 - SailNet Community
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post #31 of 64 Old 01-04-2008
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My experience in heavy rain while hiking and camping is that it's hard to beat a poncho. On a boat I think a poncho and high boots would be good though I don't have enough experience to say for certain. A poncho over anything would be better than anything by itself, and if you have a poncho over most clothing and jackets it still breaths because the air can circulate under it. I think poncho's are highly under rated, even by hikers.

What are you pretending not to know ?

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post #32 of 64 Old 01-04-2008
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Yes, his neck gasket was damaged, as was just about everybody's drysuit somehow or other. It showed us a scenario we never thought would happen could, and does. After that we dressed for warmth but not for water impermeability.


who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little
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post #33 of 64 Old 01-04-2008
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Salopetes: In YnGlish we call those "farmer johns".

Divers' neoprene booties, available in different thicknesses with soft or hard soles, also make great foul wx boots as long as your pants are long enough to overlap. Whatever water gets in, gets warm, and they are way lighter than conventional boots. Cheaper, too.

I used to wear a wool watch cap, but got tired of trying to duck the sun when looking aloft. One night I'm watching "MASH" and I see Radar is wearing a watch cap with a short bill on it--so I dug them up. They are called "Jeep Caps" and five years ago you had to search the surplus stores to find them, one size fits all in khaki or black. Now, they are a FASHION ITEM available in all sorts of fibers and colors. Plenty still to be found for $5-10.
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post #34 of 64 Old 01-04-2008
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my two cents

Namaste!

Been a while since I've posted (been busy with all kinds of things).

I'd like to add my two cents to the discussion.

I've "sailed" (OK, we motored as sailing wasn't an option) from Portsmouth, RI, to Annapolis, MD, in May of last year. It was very, very cold, very, very windy, and a bit wet (we were blessed not to get rained on).

Here's what I wore:

Undershirt. Can be anything, cotton, whatever. In this case it's the layer you want to add the air pocket you need.

Silk undershirt. Longsleeve. A MUST.

Silk longjohns. A MUST.

Thermal skiing tights. I have a pair from my cross-country days (not too many of them unfortunately). I skiied once when the windchill brought temps down to -20. I had no idea it was that cold (wasn't cold and didn't feel it, but the wind was definitely ripping). 'Twas up in Minnesota.

Heavy jeans. Helps keep the wind out actually.

Turtleneck. Heavy weight is better. The neck helps to retain body heat.

Fisherman's oiled wool sweater. Really heavy, stretchy, with good loft. Mine is an old Land's End sweater (maybe about 15 years old?). I can usually wear just that over a turtleneck, silk undershirt, t-shirt and be quite toasty - no jacket needed. Although on the water I DID need the jacket.

Synthetic skull/watch cap. EMS had a nice spandexy thing that really kept my head warm.

Fleece cap. Wore that over the watch cap. No problems with heat loss at all.

SLAM foul weather bib overall. Breathable PVC. Worked GREAT! A little tough to get out of with layers on, but, with practice it got easier.

SLAM jacket to match. Not great for heat retention, but did add a layer. 'sides, it matched.

NorthFace Summit Series Mountain Parka/Climbing Jacket. That jacket is awesome! Warm, dry, waterproof, windproof, and lightweight. Great hood too! Held up under salt water spray pretty darn well to boot.

SmartWool socks. Can't beat 'em.

Waterproof, insulated, hiking boots. Perhpas a no-no as far as deck cleaning goes, BUT, in cold/wet, you can't beat 'em! Mine didn't leave any marks and I was glad I took them! EMS top o the line brand too.

Eddie Bauer thinsulate gloves. I used these as a liner.

West Marine cold-weather sailing gloves. Windproof and waterproof, with cuffs. Light on the insulation (hence the use of the other gloves above). Once lined the combination kept my hands from freezing.

One thing to bear in mind on a boat is that you do more sitting than moving in most cases. So, you have to dress a little heavier than if you were constantly moving. By varying the layers you can accomodate much by way of temps/conditions.

Also, go with wool or silk as either will still keep you warm when wet. Cotton won't do squat for you that way (although as an undershirt coupled with the silk it works out just fine). Fleece also keeps you warm when wet. Though fleece can easily cause you to become overheated. Watch the artificials as they may not function as advertised - such has been my experience as an outdoorsman of sorts.

The best advice is to dress such that you either don't sweat or keep that to a minimum. Lots of sweat is your enemy as that will eventually chill you.

Having used both breatheable PVC and GoreTex, I can recommend both. I like my SLAM gear - it isn't the offshore rig they sell, but it worked really well on top of the proper layers. I appreciated greatly my NorthFace jacket. I've bought NorthFace most of my adult life and don't intend to switch (despite their seemingly really high prices) as the garments hold up really well under the harsh treatments I give 'em.

In cold winds, wrap something around your neck such as a scarf - you'll appreciate that!

Well, that's enough - my 3 year old's behind needs to be changed (he refuses to train up at this point).

Peace, Love, and Light,

/s/ Jon C. Munson II

P.S. I don't know if these are made any more, but there used to be a two-layer "longjohn" system of cotton on the underside and wool on the outer. I used that when installing security alarms and that stuff kept me quite toasty! So I'd recommend that as well.

Last edited by jmunson2; 01-04-2008 at 10:07 PM. Reason: Added P.S.
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post #35 of 64 Old 01-04-2008
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staying warm and dry at sea

in my experiance sailing the west coast ,I find that the hood on your foul weather jacket is very important. If it does not fit tight around your face then it is not vey good. If the neck part of the jacket go all the way up to your knose then it won't keep your face warm and dry. If the hood acts like a air scoop and blow air and water on your face, especialy your check then it is no good. I have West Marine offshore and it works great.
As to the low voltage suit: when you are soaked in salt water 12v will shock you. I was working on a tweve volt running light taking green water over me and I was getting shocked by the tweve volts on my hands from the bare wires. If you could stay dry I think it would be ok. It is better than getting hypthermia.
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post #36 of 64 Old 01-05-2008
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Personally, I think it is better to dress appropriately for the conditions, than it is to rely on heated garments... chances are very likely that if it is so cold that you need the heated garments, the biggest danger you'll have is icebergs—at least on salt water.

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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #37 of 64 Old 01-05-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Personally, I think it is better to dress appropriately for the conditions, than it is to rely on heated garments... chances are very likely that if it is so cold that you need the heated garments, the biggest danger you'll have is icebergs—at least on salt water.
Or your taking blood thinners

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I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
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post #38 of 64 Old 01-05-2008
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Racer you could have stopped reading at Dog's post. He covered exactly what you need to know about staying warm in wet/cold environments.

Synthetics head to toe.
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post #39 of 64 Old 01-05-2008
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Even if you're taking blood thinners, I think you're better dressing appropriately, than you are relying on heated garments. If you're relying on heated garments, and not dressed appropriately, what do you think is gonna happen if the electricity craps out... if you thought you were in bad shape... you ain't seen nothing.
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Or your taking blood thinners

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #40 of 64 Old 01-05-2008
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I recommend a wheelhouse.

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