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-   -   rebedding stanchions (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/39660-rebedding-stanchions.html)

adamtroyg 01-05-2008 12:45 PM

rebedding stanchions
 
Did search around the site for this topic and couldn't find any info. Please direct me if you know where it exists.

First year with my Sabre 28. "TIKI" is 35 years old and I've many projects to tackle. Some of my stanchions are leaky & needing resetting (?rebedding?) with poly sulfite? The screw just spin and don't back out. So I tried to used a putty knife to get under the old caulk and failed. Found out the last person to do this job on the boat used 5200 and they're seemingly impossible to get up. Besides lots of force ( hammer & chisel) , any suggestions on how to proceed? I'm in NJ and won't get to the work 'till spring , but want to have a plan of attack. I just clear caulked them for a temp fix.

Thanks,
AdamTroyg

Maine Sail 01-05-2008 12:49 PM

As far as I know..
 
As far as I know, and you will find this true on 90+% of boats, the stanchions are not "screwed in" but rather through bolted. Many times this requires removing interior cabinetry or components to get at the nuts on the interior.

Using a battery powered impact wrench, such as the ones made by Makita, DeWalt or even Ryobi, can make this usual two person job a one person job in many instances..

sailingdog 01-05-2008 01:25 PM

As for the 5200, get Debond 2000. :) It is designed to chemically weaken 5200 iron grip.

Faster 01-05-2008 01:41 PM

Sometimes, if there's room to work it, a piece of piano wire (or a heavy gauge guitar string) can be used to "cut" the 5200 through underneath the bonded part. Get a couple of peices of dowling to make the handles so you can put some pressure on the wire without slicing yourself up. (kinda like a "garrotte" you see in spy movies)

This is a great time to address the backing plate situation - if they are not there, or inadequate, have some made and you'll have a more secure installation and fewer problems in the future.

sailingdog 01-05-2008 01:46 PM

BTW, if the stanchions go through a cored deck, make sure, before you rebed the stanchions to "pott" the holes for the fasteners. Also, backing plates are a good thing, and since you're doing this, you might as well do it right.

Finally, when bedding the stanchions, countersink the fastener holes a tiny bit. That way, the sealant can form an "o-ring" around each screw, and it will make the installation that much more waterproof.

Freesail99 01-05-2008 03:11 PM

I think many say there stanchions are "screwed in" because many have a slotted head, rather then a head you can put a wrench to. Every boat I've owned at least did.

sailingdog 01-05-2008 04:01 PM

Freesail-

Generally, when someone says they're screwed in...they have wood screws holding them in place... rather than machines screws with nuts and washers... there's a huge difference in the holding ability of one versus the other, particularly in brittle fiberglass laminates.

Freesail99 01-05-2008 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingdog (Post 245988)
Freesail-

Generally, when someone says they're screwed in...they have wood screws holding them in place... rather than machines screws with nuts and washers... there's a huge difference in the holding ability of one versus the other, particularly in brittle fiberglass laminates.

Come on, what I said was fairly clear. I suggested why they use the WORD screw rather then bolted. It be insane to use screws in fiberglass, That isn't what I said or implied. I really do work on my boat and don't pay someone else to do it.

Maine Sail 01-05-2008 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Freesail99 (Post 245995)
Come on, what I said was fairly clear. I suggested why they use the WORD screw rather then bolted. It be insane to use screws in fiberglass, That isn't what I said or implied. I really do work on my boat and don't pay someone else to do it.

The OP is doing exactly as Freesail99 implied and a perfect example of this.

Sabre 28's have through bolted stanchions many times installed with round top machine screw heads.

The OP thinks he's unscrewing screws while in reality he's only broken any remaining water tight seal he had left by twisting the "bolts", with screw heads, or machine screws as they are referred to as. Most times the nut on the under side just spins because some bedding compound got onto the threads and is acting like Loc-Tite..

Freesail99 01-05-2008 04:40 PM

It is a 2 man job if you can't jam a pair of vise grips down below to hold the nut.


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