To Traveler or Not and How to Size a Smaller Jib - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 01-15-2008
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To Traveler or Not and How to Size a Smaller Jib

I'm trying to prepare my (new to me) MacGregor 22 for inland lake sailing and ran into a couple of questions that I hope you all can help answer -

1. Traveler - the mainsheet is attached at the end of the boom in a 4:1 arrangement and does not per se have an adjustable traveler. The sheet travels through blocks and cleats at each corner of the transom. What sort of performance is sacrificed by this arrangement vs say, a mid-boom main sheet with car?

2. I have no jib smaller than 100%. Considering whether to get something smaller for conditions requiring less area - when going smaller to 65% or so, what dimensions end up changing? Are the foot and luff both shortened? How are the new dimensions determined? What is the best choice for a smaller jib, given that I don't want to invest in more than 1 new one, this year.

FYI - the boat is typically based on KY Lake, but I would like to take to Michigan or Erie sometime in the future.
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Old 01-15-2008
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Lack of a traveler will reduce your performance sailing close hauled somewhat, I'll arbritarily guess 20% or so - the boat will sail perhaps 5 degress further off the wind, and lose something like 10% of speed over the ground, due to the inability to properly trim the main. As a casual sailor you may not particularly notice this performance loss, especially since there are probably a dozen other design factors making the Mac 22 a relatively slow boat (no offense intended...).

A 100% is a good small jib, you shouldn't need anything smaller, if the wind is too strong for a 100% with no main, you should be at home anyway. For lake sailing, I'd worry more about having a good BIG jib, have a nice 150% for your primary use?
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Old 01-15-2008
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I put a Harkin SB traveller on my Venture 21 and it made a world of difference with regards to control, especially in heavier weather. I used the end boom arrangement. I don't trust the strength of the Mac booms enough for mid boom sheeting.
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Old 01-16-2008
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Thanks for your comments/advice. In answer to sailingfool - yes, I do have a 150% genoa.
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Old 01-16-2008
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Charlie - I couldn't send a PM, so here is another question - "can you offer some insight on how you did the install for the traveler? Did you span across the cockpit and mount on the seats? Was the track directly below the end of the boom, when centered?"
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Old 01-16-2008
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The problem with performance in your current configuration is that if you let out the mainsail using the sheet, you put twist in the main, changing the shape and changing performance. The traveler allows you to let out the mainsail without twist by "dropping" the main on the traveler, or moving it to the leeward side. In the case of stronger winds, it is one of the steps you take to depower the main, keeping the sail flat. As said, you shouldn't need less than a 100%. Even here in the Bay, summer sailing in high winds usually requires an 80%. Situations more difficult would be ill-advised on a boat that was not meant for it. Have fun, and go for the traveler if you can swing it.
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Old 01-16-2008
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parttimesailor, I installed it at the end of the cockpit seats, spanning the cockpit just in front of the lazerette hatch. I used the track made for spanning open spaces with 8 bolts to a side with 2" washers for backing plates. The sheeting system uses the original fiddle on the boom and a new ratcheting block and cam cleat combo attached to the car. The boom ends about 6" forward of the traveler. This setup uses a single 60' sheet and works great. It's actually a better setup than what's on my big boat but because Oh Joy's tackle is mahogany/bronze and the track bronze, I'll live with it to maintain the look. I may incorporate some end blocks so I can control the car position on Oh Joy though. I just have to figure out how to make it look authentic.
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Old 07-07-2009
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A good example of the value of this community

after listening to advice from my orig question - I installed a traveler in the off-season. I also have a 130 genny on a furler.

The traveler is attached at about 2/3 of the boom length. What a difference in handling/sailing! The furler has also been quite helpful as the 25-yr-old main doesn't have any reef points. Wind and wave conditions on my last 2 sails have been challenging for this small boat!

Next season I will replace/upgrade the main.
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