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  #1  
Old 02-09-2008
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Jib winch on mast.

Is there any reason that I couldn't use the winch on the port-side of my mast for my main halyard?

My boat was rigged with the winch being used for my jib halyard. As my jib is on a furler, the winch was never used.

It would be handy to have the main halyard on the winch so that my main can be cinched up tight.

Any suggestions?
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Old 02-09-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingwelshman View Post
Is there any reason that I couldn't use the winch on the port-side of my mast for my main halyard?

My boat was rigged with the winch being used for my jib halyard. As my jib is on a furler, the winch was never used.

It would be handy to have the main halyard on the winch so that my main can be cinched up tight.

Any suggestions?
Hi,

I think the answer depends on whether the main halyard can be led fair to the winch. If it can, there shouldn't be any reason not to do it.

But in general, I prefer to have the halyards run through line stoppers (aka rope clutches) ahead of the winches, so they can be removed from the winch after the hoist or adjustment. This frees up the winch for other purposes. Rope clutches are very handy and are well worth the investment.
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Old 02-09-2008
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I have a winch on either side of the mast for the main and jib halyards each. If you only have one winch and no clutches you are limiting yourself somewhat.

Why not if you have a fair lead?
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Old 02-09-2008
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My halyards

disapeer into the mast 4 or 5' above the winches on the mast and have been rigged either way as I also have two winches on the mast with clutches for everything.

I personally like the main on the starboard side as Im right handed so it's easier to watch it go up, if I were left handed I would have it on the port.
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Old 02-10-2008
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I had a 25' boat also w/o a main halyard winch. With a simple cunningham, you can generate all the luff tension your heart desires.
Another little trick is to install a cleat (your loads are not that too big) or a rope clutch and 'jump' the halyard. This involves pulling the halyard perpendicular to the mast while cleated which generates a lot of mechanical advantage, and then pull the halyard through the stopper at the same time you let it go with the other hand.. Maybe some racer types could put it in better words. IMO you don't 'need' a halyard winch on a 26' sailboat.
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I agree with sailboy. You don't need a winch for a main halyard on a 26' boat. You should be able to get all the tension you need by sweating the halyard. That involves leading the halyard around the main halyard cleat and pulling upwards on the end with one hand. Then, with the other hand, pull the halyard like the string of an archer's bow. Then, pull in the end of the line and cleat it off. You might also be able to rest a butt cheek on the boom and use your weight to add tension to the luff. It's not as elegant as a winch, but it works fine.
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Old 02-10-2008
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Thanks all for your insight.

We have been using the 'jump' or 'sweating' (are those the actual terms?) techniques to tighten the main.

I think I will cleat off the jib halyard and keep the winch clear to use for MOB recovery or some other function.

Thanks again.
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If at all possible run halyards back to the cockpit using just one winch for: halyards, outhaul, vang, cunningham, ect... its more convenient, faster, and safer........
p.s. what kind of boat?
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Old 02-10-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starboardyacht View Post
If at all possible run halyards back to the cockpit using just one winch for: halyards, outhaul, vang, cunningham, ect... its more convenient, faster, and safer........
p.s. what kind of boat?
I like the idea of running the halyards aft - especially as I plan on single-handing a lot. But I'm new to sailing and the boat is new to me so I don't want to make too many drastic changes to its rigging configuration until I know what I want I want out of it.

My boat is a Nash 26' (1979). I couldn't find much info on it, but here is a spec sheet: http://sailquest.com/market/models/nash26.htm
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Old 02-10-2008
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Running the lines aft (if you feel the need) is a wonderful winter project.
As your boat is a 1979 there might be an active owners group already out there.
I found this entry at http://goodoldboat.com:8080/GOBWeb/G...ch_heading=NNN
for the Nash - I'm not going to post it here because it include a email and phone number for the contact:
Nash 26
Paul F. Charbonneau
1 Browning Ave Ste 5
Toronto, M4K 1V6


Folks that already own the boat can give a lot of info on the boat, upgrades and problems they have had over the years.

Installing a turning block at the base of your mast to provide a fair lead back to your coach roof top, then a small self tailing winch (with a backing plate under it) and a couple of cam cleats/line stoppers shouldn't be too hard or too expensive - especially if you can find good but used winches out there (find a junk boat in a marina that has one and offer to 'salvage' a part for 1/2 what you'd pay and you may get lucky).

Good luck with your boat, get out there and use it!

You know now you can always find advice here.
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