Crimping versus Soldering - Page 18 - SailNet Community

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  #171  
Old 05-28-2009
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Yes, there are a lot of soldered connections, but I'd also point out that most of the soldered connections you're talking about were done by a wave soldering machine rather than much more fallible human beings. I'd also point out that most of the same equipment will also have some crimped connections—which haven't failed at any greater a rate than the soldered ones you mention.

However, in the specific case the rest of us are discussing—user installed wiring on a boat—crimping is far more likely to result in a decent connection than is soldering.

You might want to open the stomach window you're using to see to get some air. The facts and the industry standards just don't support your statements or viewpoint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eolon View Post
Wow, hot topic. Tragically, I have a job so I can't endlessly post superfluous minutia, maybe when I retire =)

Soldering = the Devil, yeah, we get it.

Of course, that doesn't exactly jive with solder traces on PC boards, does it? That solder runs just about everything in your life, from your computer, to your car, to your doorbell.

Anyhow, I'm sure you're right, I just thought you might be interested in an alternate opinion. Guess not.

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e

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  #172  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Yes, there are a lot of soldered connections, but I'd also point out that most of the soldered connections you're talking about were done by a wave soldering machine rather than much more fallible human beings. I'd also point out that most of the same equipment will also have some crimped connections—which haven't failed at any greater a rate than the soldered ones you mention.

However, in the specific case the rest of us are discussing—user installed wiring on a boat—crimping is far more likely to result in a decent connection than is soldering.

You might want to open the stomach window you're using to see to get some air. The facts and the industry standards just don't support your statements or viewpoint.
Facts and Industry standards? that's odd, I don't remember reading that facts and industry standards were required in order to relate our particular experiences and knowledge. This is the internet, you know... unless you thought it was your personal amazing fairyland and you are the Galactic Overlord. If so, excuse me - please don't sic your minions on me!

Best Regards,

e

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  #173  
Old 05-29-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
The facts and the industry standards just don't support your statements or viewpoint.
ABYC, NASA, FAA, US Military, . . .

How disappointing, no one has quoted yet from the shipping classification societies of the Marine Industry.

LR - Lloyd's Register
DNV - Det Norske Veritas
NK - Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (ClassNK)
ABS - American Bureau of Shipping

ACS - Asia Classification Society
BKI - Biro Klasifikasi Indonesia
BV - Bureau Veritas
CCS - China Classification Society
CR - China Corporation Register of Shipping
CRS - Hrvatski Registar Brodova (Croatian Register of Shipping)
GL - Germanischer Lloyd
HRS - Hellenic Register of Shipping for Greece
ICS - Iranian Classification Society
IRS - Indian Register of Shipping
IROS - International Register of Shipping
KR - Korean Register of Shipping
PRS - Polish Register of Shipping (Polski Rejestr Statków)
RBNA - Registro Brasileiro de Navios (Brazilian Register of Shipping)
RINA - Registro Italiano Navale
RINAVE - Registro Internacional Naval SA
RS - Russian Maritime Register of Shipping
GBS - Guardian Bureau of Shipping
SCM - Ships Classification (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd
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Old 05-29-2009
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Old 05-30-2009
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How bad would this be?

How bad would it be to use ordinary crimp connectors, like those from Radio Shack, with marine adhesive lined heat shrink over it for any area not expected to be near water, like inside headliners?
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  #176  
Old 05-30-2009
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While the adhesive lined heat shrink would protect the connection from moisture, the connection is nowhere near as good. A proper marine crimp connector is made of tinned solid copper while the lower quality are usually aluminum. See Mainesail's site below for examples of the quality differences.
All About Marine Wire Termination Photo Gallery by Maine Sailing at pbase.com
Brian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
jarcher
While the adhesive lined heat shrink would protect the connection from moisture, the connection is nowhere near as good. A proper marine crimp connector is made of tinned solid copper while the lower quality are usually aluminum. See Mainesail's site below for examples of the quality differences.
All About Marine Wire Termination Photo Gallery by Maine Sailing at pbase.com
Brian
Thanks Brian, makes sense. Marine connectors it will be this weekend then!

Is there an online source for these where they cost less than about $0.90 per unit?
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  #178  
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I'm from the west coast of Canada, but I think Hamilton Marine might be a good place to try.
Brian
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  #179  
Old 05-30-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jarcher View Post
Is there an online source for these where they cost less than about $0.90 per unit?
Even the thinner walled 3M heat shrink butt connectors can be found at Wall*Mart in the automotive section but they are not that much less money than the better built FTZ connectors from Sailors Solutions.

Terminal Town (LINK) (less money, I don't know the quality, but these guys do mostly aircraft stuff)

Cable Organizer.com (LINK)
(check out their starter kit with ratcheting crimper NSPA-1003-UL)
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  #180  
Old 05-30-2009
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Blade Connectors?

ABYC frowns on the use of friction connectors (aka blade and bullet connectors). Essentially Friction connectors (the blade and bullet variety) are allowed, provided they resist a 6-pound pull.

Many engine sensors use blade connectors. Since the engine a pretty good source of vibration, is there a good method to prevent these blade connectors from loosening over time?

I've seen instances where wires are soldered to the directly to the blades - such as speaker connections.

Are connections like these preferable if there are soldered to the spade connections?
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