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  #1  
Old 05-12-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

I need a dinghy. Being that there are virtually no used dinghies anywhere, I am left with either building one or buying new. After pricing the option of building., cost of plans + fiberglassing kit + foam + plywood + equipment., it appears I would only be saving myself about 50 dollars over purchasing a new walker bay 8. Are the Walker Bay 8''s good., do they tow as easily as the pram type with a lot of rocker. Which is better.
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Old 05-12-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

I''ve got a Walker Bay 10, and it makes a fine Dingy for light-weather use. I power it with a 2.5 outboard and it moves along just fine. It tows great.

Reasons to buy the Walker Bay:

1) I''ve got kids, and plan to let them use it as a sailing dingy (sailing kit optional) when they''re a little older.

2) It''s light. At 125 lbs, I use a wisker pole and two halyards to easily pluck it out of the water and onto my deck.

3) The plastic has proven pretty durable. I tend to puncture inflatables on oysters/barnacles.

4) Inexpensive. I bought mine on sale at Boats US for $599.

5) Clean white lines match my boat nicely.

Reasons NOT to buy the Walker Bay:

1) Floatation. With a full load, I could see getting swamped by a megayacht on the ICW if. I also could see getting swamped in semi-heavy seas. You''re not going to make a beach run through even small breakers.

2) Floatation part II. The CG limit is 3 for the Walker Bay 10, or 350 lbs max. I think the WB8 limit is 2. If there''s only 2 of you, you''ll be OK, but 3 adults is pushing it.

3) When I take it out by myself the bow runs HIGH. I usually take some Jerry Cans filled with water and put them in the bow.

4) If you want to swim off your dink, getting back in an inflatable is A LOT easier than any hard dink.

With all that said, I''m fine with the Walker Bay in good weather, but there''s a good reason 90% of the dinks I tie up with at dingy docks up and down the east coast are inflatable. As a trade-off I keep an inflatable rolled up in my cockpit locker, but for buzzing into the town-of-the-moment I like the speed of a hard dink.

Almost all the crusiers I know like rigid inflatables, which is the best of both worlds, but expensive.
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Old 05-12-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

I chose an inflatable with a roll up floor.(8 ft Avon)I can easily handle it myself and it stows easily on my deck. It doesnt motor nearly as well as a hard dink but it does alright with my 3.5 outboard. I think towing a dink around is a pain in the butt. I prefer to have it on deck.
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Old 05-13-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

I had an inflatabe for many years, but didn''t like the ride or lack of useable space, even though it could hold quite a bit of weight for its size. I considered hard dinks, but thought they might be a bit akward to stow without a stern davit.

At a recent boat show I saw a Porta-Bote on display, and spent some time asking how they fold and how much they can hold. Based on a pretty good show price, I decided to buy the 10''5" version (They also make an 8'' and a 12'' version).

When folded, it takes up 10''5" X 2'' x 4" and weighs 58 pounds, so I keep it strapped to the lifelines. Moreover, it can hold four adults or about 900 pounds total. It can handle an outboard of up to 5 HP so long as it weighs 44 pounds or less. (I found a 4 HP outboard on ebay that weighs 38 pounds. BTW, it can also be sailed, with the optional sail package.)

From what I''ve read, the Porta-Bote is virtually indestructable. Also, hull material is lighter than water, so the boat cannot sink, even when partially loaded.

Happy sails to you. ~ _/) ~
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Old 05-14-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

Morning Rick.

Check your sail.net email. I dropped you a line about "Gypsy Grils", the hard dink that Bill used with "Gypsy" for many years. You''re welcome to her. I think she''s salvageable; with beautiful jobs you did on the Cape Dory & Centaur, I have no doubt you can resurrect an eight foot dingy. You''re welcome to it if you want.

I found a used zodiac w/outboard 3-4 years ago, which I use as a small runabout/tender/fishing boat.

In exchange, I could use a bit of help with my marlinspike seamanship.

Drew

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Old 05-14-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

The right dinghy is a constant topic of discussion. I like to row, so an inflatable is not the answer. I also don''t care to mess with an outboard(carry gas, etc.). For coastal cruising/day sailing between ports I tow a 15'' wherry. It tows very well, and rows great around the anchorage. Too bad its way too big to fit on deck of a 40'' sloop. I had a 9'' Dyer with a sailing rig. It would fit on the foredeck and give me access to the anchor locker. But I decided I didn''t like it either. So my latest dinghy is a custom design 10'' that splits in half so I can store it on the house top under the boom. Its built using stitch and tape construction, has a dagger board and sailing rig. The cost will be about 500$ plus my labor. But I can store it on board and row about the anchorage. It was designed by Danny Green if I recall correctly.

I have seen a production hard dink that splits in half on an Australian boat, I don''t know if its available in the US.

Good Luck
Dave
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Old 07-25-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

If you must go with a small boat walker bay 8 is the way to go. The ten isnt that much bigger and allows only 30 more. I find the boat to be a little tipsy but I''m thinking having a dagger board is a good idea to combat that. But if you can go bigger and wider then you''ll enjoy that much more stability. I have the walker bay 10. The 8 is the way I think I should have gone because those things and because it''s a lot lighter.
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Old 07-27-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

I too debated what kind of dingy to buy, I bought a portabote because I wanted the security of puncture resistance. I also wanted to be able to row when I choose to, and I wanted to be able to stow it on board or tow it, depending on the circumstances. I''ve had the 8'' model for about a month now and can say I like it. I''d put a nissan 4hp 4 stroke on it, but it was too heavy and powered the boat way too fast to be safe. I now have a honda 2hp 4 stroke on it, which is ideal. It''s a very dry boat, I''ve been outside the breakwater in 2-3'' swells and other boats wakes without a problem. It only weighs about 48# so hoisting or towing is no big deal. Just remember to take oars and spare gas with you, I''ve ran out but it rows so well it really didn''t matter. I have a 35'' boat so this kind of dingy suits me, you have to get used to sitting in the middle of the seat for balance, but I found that with the tiller centered, in calm conditions, all I have to do is lean an inch or two one way or the other to steer the boat, it''s pretty neat, almost like having an auto pilot. Anyway, all choices are personal, this is just my tuppence worth to assist you in making yours.
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Old 07-27-2002
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which type dinghy is the better

I have the Aquapro 8''6" RIB with aluminum bottom on a 28'' sail and love it. Much lighter than the fiberglass RIB''s and stows on the foredeck easily. Does about 25mph with an 8hp Yamaha 2 stroke with two persons but will carry four easily. I wish I had chosen the 9'' however, but I didn''t think it would fit on the foredeck. Avoid 4 stroke OB''s if you can. Much heavier and little environmental benefit since the new oil mixes are 100:1.
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Old 12-13-2006
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Aquapro Aluminum RIBs

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardElliott
I have the Aquapro 8''6" RIB with aluminum bottom on a 28'' sail and love it.
Does anyone else have an aluminum RIB? I have never encountered a cruiser with one. Any feedback as to their quality, usefulness, and reliability would be appreciated.

Here's the website for Aquapro.

http://www.aquapro.co.nz/content.cfm...r=2&content=17

My experience is that Avon's and Zodiacs don't hold up to constant use in the Tropics, and that as far as fiberglass RIBs go, Caribe is the way to go. They have three air chambers and last longer.
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