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  #111  
Old 01-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by absolute77 View Post
The HFT crimper is a crimper for DIN insulated terminals while the Anchor crimper is for regular terminals not in compliance with the DIN standards. Thats is why you get this result during crimping. The DIN terminals have different (smaller) dimensions in length. It is NOT that the tool does not crimp well. It is that you use it to crimp the wrong terminals!
Really? Perhaps then you could REFERENCE which DIN standard that crimp tool is intended for because NONE of the packaging indicates anything other than "For Insulated & Bare Terminals" and HFT knows nothing and can't tell you anything about them.

Also HFT sells another tool with closer specs to the Ancor tool and it uses the SAME part number as the one with the steel plate jaws... SAME PART NUMBER!!! Is the one on the left picture below also for DIN? They share the same part number, but come out of different countries, and different factories..? Who knows and how the heck would a customer know? If HFT has NO CLUE and stamps two completely different crimp tools with the SAME part number it's all a crap shoot on which crimp standard they are aiming towards....

I called HFT a long whole ago about this and NO ONE there had any clue as to what standard those tool are built to. All they could say is they crimp red, blue & yellow insulated & uninsulated terminals and it does not do either of those very well.


The two orange handled tools are sold under the SAME part number.. Your guess is as good as mine....



P.S. You might want to read post #56 before assuming what the #97420 HFT crimper is or is not..
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 01-04-2012 at 10:19 AM.
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  #112  
Old 01-04-2012
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"it's all a crap shoot "
On behalf of sailors on all the seven seas, I must formally protest the implication that rolling the dice is no more reliable than gambling on the quality of HF tools.
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  #113  
Old 01-04-2012
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I have the "good" HF Crimper (the one on the far left). I have yet to make a decent crimp with it.

I have since resorted back to using my old, trusty, Sta Kon crimping pliers for regular crimps.

They work first time - every time.

IMHO, the HF Ratcheting crimping tool is worthless.

However, the crimping tool for adhesive lined crimps from SailorsSolutions ROCKS!

Last edited by eherlihy; 01-04-2012 at 07:49 PM.
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  #114  
Old 01-04-2012
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Cheap tools never get dropped overboard. This is an irrefutable scientific fact.

Expensive tools and smart phones are attracted to salt water. They will defy all laws of physics as they migrate towards the brine. This is an irrefutable scientific fact.
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  #115  
Old 01-04-2012
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Since my time is cheap and no nav lights in the traffic lane can be annoying I spend a little time soldering all wire ends to their crimpable ends. Heat shrinkable insulation over or self vulcanizing high voltage tape to finish the job.
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  #116  
Old 01-04-2012
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Its fair to ask so let me introduce me! I am a mechanical engineer now working for the automotive industry in UK. But many years ago i was working as a marine electrician on my own. I did this job for about 8 years. I used to love it. I have a classic A&R 1920's 12m yacht in Greece,Corfu where originally come from. I registered to the site to learn from others and share my experience if it will be of any use. Not to promote anything.
In my previous post i did not promote any product at all. I dont understand where you saw that. I just had exactly the same thing/problem happened to me when i was learning about tools and etc. The tool industry in this sector is very tricky and very confusing. Is very easy to make mistakes and buy or use the wrong tool. Thank you for welcoming me and as we say in Greece i wish everybody strong winds on their sails!



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Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
Absolute,

Welcome to sailnet.

Can you say more about yourself? I get suspicious when a first post is in support of one product or another. Especially when the country of manufacture has more English speakers than the U.S.

Regards,
Brad
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  #117  
Old 01-04-2012
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That's the DIN 46237. These terminals look the same as the regular ones but have different dimensions. They need a specific DIN tool which has identical die geometry with the ones of your HFT. For example, look at the Pressmaster website to see that they sell a specific tool for them that has exactly the same dies like the one you talk about.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
Really? Perhaps then you could REFERENCE which DIN standard that crimp tool is intended for because NONE of the packaging indicates anything other than "For Insulated & Bare Terminals" and HFT knows nothing and can't tell you anything about them.

Also HFT sells another tool with closer specs to the Ancor tool and it uses the SAME part number as the one with the steel plate jaws... SAME PART NUMBER!!! Is the one on the left picture below also for DIN? They share the same part number, but come out of different countries, and different factories..? Who knows and how the heck would a customer know? If HFT has NO CLUE and stamps two completely different crimp tools with the SAME part number it's all a crap shoot on which crimp standard they are aiming towards....

I called HFT a long whole ago about this and NO ONE there had any clue as to what standard those tool are built to. All they could say is they crimp red, blue & yellow insulated & uninsulated terminals and it does not do either of those very well.


The two orange handled tools are sold under the SAME part number.. Your guess is as good as mine....



P.S. You might want to read post #56 before assuming what the #97420 HFT crimper is or is not..
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  #118  
Old 01-04-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by absolute77 View Post
That's the DIN 46237. These terminals look the same as the regular ones but have different dimensions. They need a specific DIN tool which has identical die geometry with the ones of your HFT. For example, look at the Pressmaster website to see that they sell a specific tool for them that has exactly the same dies like the one you talk about.
This goes right back to my main point.. Why is HFT selling a DIN crimper in the US where we do not use DIN terminals? I don't even know if you can buy DIN terminals here, I've never seen them or seen any reference to DIN with my US distributors (usually AMP, Molex, FTZ etc.).

Why do they have two crimpers sold under the same model number one for DIN and one not? How is a customer to know it's the wrong crimp tool for the terminals available in the US? They're not going to know when it is simply sold for red, blue, yellow.

I suspect my original point of buyer beware is still relevant.

The gold standard in the US are the AMP PIDG terminals. Most other terminals available here are built to a similar dimensional spec.
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  #119  
Old 01-05-2012
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I agree with you 100%. Many companies just copy tool designs without really knowing what they sell. That's why when you have cheap tools you have no tools in my book. Crimping a terminal is the best method, not questions here. But only when you crimping tool is professional quality and you know exactly what you are doing. I think that for the average DIY person that can not spend hundreds on a tool then soldering is a very good alternative. I never had problems with soldering a terminal if done carefully.
Moreover, i believe a better and cheaper alternative to heat shrink terminals are the open barrel (also called F, B) terminals when are insulated with quality adhesive shrink tubing. They provide much better electrical contact (proven on many technical papers/publications), the wire is much better secured on the terminal and are the industry standard, here in Europe at least, for automotive,marine and in general for all demanding applications. They just need super expensive crimping tools if you need the job done right. The DIY tools on the market for those terminals are just not up for doing a good job. Good professional tools for open barrels can be found through companies such as Thomas & Betts, Pressmaster and Phoenix Contact. However, you need to buy 2-3 of them if you need to cover the whole range of the terminals for all wire dimensions.
That's why my opinion is always to leave the electrical , wiring, electronics of your boat to a professional certified by a marine authority that has already invested on the proper professional tools. :-P






Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
This goes right back to my main point.. Why is HFT selling a DIN crimper in the US where we do not use DIN terminals? I don't even know if you can buy DIN terminals here, I've never seen them or seen any reference to DIN with my US distributors (usually AMP, Molex, FTZ etc.).

Why do they have two crimpers sold under the same model number one for DIN and one not? How is a customer to know it's the wrong crimp tool for the terminals available in the US? They're not going to know when it is simply sold for red, blue, yellow.

I suspect my original point of buyer beware is still relevant.

The gold standard in the US are the AMP PIDG terminals. Most other terminals available here are built to a similar dimensional spec.
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  #120  
Old 08-22-2012
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Re: Harbor Freight Tools - Crimper Update

I realize this is an older post, but I'd like to update some current (8/22/2012) info on the Ancor #701030 Double Crimp Tool. I received my new Ancor double crimp tool today (purchased from Amazon.com) and it turns out this tool is now made in Taiwan and the crimping dies are in the supposed "improper" position (die with colored dots and smaller saddle is on the fixed upper handle section and the larger saddle die is in the lower, moveable handle section). This crimp tool, as is, will most likely work fine, but, as with many hand tools, it appears this might not be quite the tool it once was.

Mike
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Last edited by twodotmike; 08-26-2012 at 10:44 PM.
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