Offshore heaters-lp, diesel, solid fuel-opinions? - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 12 Old 03-20-2008 Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
Offshore heaters-lp, diesel, solid fuel-opinions?

I want to put heaters in my Pearson 33 and Tartan 34 to extend the season away from the dock. They would mostly be used at anchor, but possibly underway some protection. There are a lot of different people using the boats. I have an alcohol stove in one and a CNG in the other, so no propane tanks. Engines are diesel. The solid fuel heaters seem like a possibility. Are they dangerous?

Wolfsong

Pearson 33 (1971)
Tartan 34-C (1977)
Tartan 37 (1978)
Lake Superior
Wolfsong is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
Moderator
 
JohnRPollard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Chesapeake
Posts: 5,680
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
For the kind of application you intend, my preference would be for propane. But since your boats aren't equipped with propane, a good choice would be the diesel versions of the Dickinson Newport stoves.

Start by perusing these threads:

cabin heater

cabin heater ideas

Dickinson Newport Propane Heater

Cutting through hole

solid fuel heaters


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Pacific Seacraft Crealock 31 #62

NEVER CALLS CRUISINGDAD BACK....CAN"T TAKE THE ACCENT

Last edited by JohnRPollard; 03-20-2008 at 10:16 PM.
JohnRPollard is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
I would go with a propane heater for the following reasons:

Solid fuel and diesel heaters tend to be pretty smoky and tend to leave exhaust stains on anything over the stack. A solid fuel heater is also going to be the most difficult to fuel for extended periods of time and the messiest to clean up after. You do have to periodically remove the ashes from a solid fuel heater, which isn't the case with a propane or diesel heater. Solid fuel is also harder to keep dry on a boat, and not necessarily easily available at marinas when you're cruising.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
A little less cheek
 
ianhlnd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Valparaiso bound
Posts: 752
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
   
I have two propane heaters, portable types that run off those green bottles. The heaters I have are approved for indoor heating with oxygen sensors. Although nothing else on the boat is propane, well the BBQ, I carry two tanks and I have an adaptor to refill the green bottles.

Check them out OSH at about $100 each

Just checking in.
Where ya'll keep'n the wimmin 'round here?
ianhlnd is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
The only problems with using the heaters that Ian is recommending are that they run the risk of CO poisoning or oxygen depletion and they create a lot of moisture inside the boat, which will lead to mold/mildew problems if not removed from the boat.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
Sailor
 
Plumper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 845
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
I have a Dickenson diesel stove in my boat. It is fantastic. It leaves no smoke stains anywhere and burns nice and clean. It keeps the entire boat (33') warm and toasty, like a wood stove in a cabin. It has extended our cruising season and is makes our boat a great place to kick back on a cold winter night. I love it.
It is gravity fed from a day tank that holds 6 gallons. It will run continuously for 7 or 8 days on a tank. I fill the tank from the fuel tanks via a little lift pump. I have never run it full on, the boat would get too warm. I don't often let it run at night when we are sleeping because I'm a bit funny that way. Most people do leave it run. They are very popular here in the PNW on real boats. You see them on liveaboards, fish boats, tugs and many others. I give mine a good clean every year or so. It is 30 years old and all original. That is good value!

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
Plumper is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
Senior Member
 
Maine Sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,828
Thanks: 19
Thanked 213 Times in 162 Posts
Rep Power: 16
       
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Solid fuel and diesel heaters tend to be pretty smoky and tend to leave exhaust stains on anything over the stack.
Yeah and the sparks can also burn holes in sails and canvas. Just ask my buddy Seth whom you met at the Maine Boat Bulders show. There have been a few interesting "solid fuel issues" over the years that were repaired at his shop.

There is a reason, draft being one, the chimney on the house is far taller than everything else....

If I were to seriously consider a heater, oh wait I have one of those POS Force 10 heaters, I mean consider a real heater, I'd go Webasto or Espar the Dickinson's are nice too..

______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Maine Sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 12 Old 03-20-2008
Sailor
 
Plumper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 845
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
I forgot to mention, the Dickenson uses no power. Zero, zilch! It makes no noise, and has no moving parts. It really is unbelievable.

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
Plumper is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 12 Old 03-21-2008
Senior Member
 
garymcg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 110
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
Let me throw in one more thing about the Dickenson heaters (I have the propane fireplace): Their support is fantastic. I emailed a question about wiring (my fan isn't working) Saturday night and got a very informative reply on Sunday morning, including troubleshooting steps, a wiring diagram, and replacement part numbers if needed.
garymcg is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 12 Old 03-21-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,364
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
I fitted an Eberspacher 3 kW, back in 1993.
It does not dry the boat as well as a solid fuel heater, but it is reliable, and easy to start and use.

Back in 1997 it filled the cabin with a thin smoke when I was asleep. I wrote to the manufacturer, got no reply, then wrote again. They sent me a spare glow plug. It has not happened since.

I never run it at night after that. Never.

So, all in, it has been a useful unit. It is virtual life support for end-of-season sailing in the canal system.
Rockter is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Production blue water boats JakeLevi Boat Review and Purchase Forum 73 07-31-2009 10:07 PM
Coastal v. Bluewater cruiser, your thoughts EveningStar Sailboat Design and Construction 17 11-02-2007 06:13 PM
Heaters: diesel or solid fuel? Seagypsywoman Gear & Maintenance 9 12-29-2004 02:22 PM
Diesel Fuel Essentials Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-22-2004 07:00 PM
Diesel Fuel Essentials Tom Wood Her Sailnet Articles 0 03-22-2004 07:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome