Radio confusion... SSB? HF? Shortwave? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 34 Old 04-09-2008
Sailor
 
Plumper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 845
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hphoen View Post
I do too! Free and easy.

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
Plumper is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 34 Old 04-09-2008
moderate?
 
camaraderie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
Hud...the registered version of JVComm is $110 bucks. Is the initial download (free) disabled in any way or does it "expire" at some point? What do you get for $110??
The software I linked to goes for $40 so I am interested in what the differences are for the price.

No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
camaraderie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 34 Old 04-09-2008
Sailor
 
Plumper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Vancouver Island
Posts: 845
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
I don't know if there are any things disabled on the free version but it has worked well for me for years now. In any event, there are others that work as well that are completely free. I have a bunch but stick to JVComm because I used it first.

There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
Shakespeare, Julius Caesar IV, iii, 217
Plumper is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 34 Old 04-09-2008
Member
 
fer@fer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 98
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
Watch Plumperīs suggestion on different models of HF receivers.
Not all of them are capable of receiving on SSB. As he said, Sony 2010 has a small switch wich turns on and of SSB capabilities.
Regards

F
fer@fer is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 34 Old 04-10-2008
moderate?
 
camaraderie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
This is an excellent one.
Sangean ATS 909

or get the custom modded version for a bit more:
Super Sangean 909

No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
camaraderie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 34 Old 04-10-2008
STARBOARD!!
 
KeelHaulin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,662
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjrogers View Post
While ham radio makes SSB (as well as AM, Morse code, and sometimes FM) transmissions, the term SSB refers to a marine band high frequency radio. These can receive everything the shortwave receives and transmit on marine frequencies, and can also transmit on Ham frequencies. Ham and Marine SSB both require a license.
I just want to make a correction/clarification to this. A Marine/SSB is not always equivalent to an HF "HAM" radio. Most Marine SSB's are designed only to transmit on the Marine Band SSB frequencies; and in the USA you must purchase a permit to transmit on the Marine/SSB frequencies. There are a few dual-purpose HF radios; but you need to check to see if they will be fully functional on both HAM and Marine/SSB frequencies. There are "mods" that can be made to standard HAM radios that will allow them to operate on the Marine/SSB bands (but you still need a paid license to transmit on the SSB bands).

A HAM "radio station" (with call sign) license is a different class of license; and you are required to attain a "General" level license or higher to operate on HF most frequencies. This type of license is pretty much free but you need to pass an exam for each license level. The license is good for 10 years IIRC. The FCC has recently dropped the test/requirement to know Morse Code so it is easier to attain the General or Extra license now than it was previously.
KeelHaulin is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 34 Old 04-10-2008
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 87
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
KeelHaulin, You are of course correct. I was intending to refer that an SSB could possibly be used on amateur frequencies, with a license. In the USA it is ok to use a marine or commercial rig to transmit on ham frequencies, but not legal to use a ham rig on marine or commercial frequencies (except in emergencies, etc., etc.).
mjrogers is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 34 Old 04-10-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 1,867
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjrogers View Post
... In the USA it is ok to use a marine or commercial rig to transmit on ham frequencies, but not legal to use a ham rig on marine or commercial frequencies (except in emergencies, etc., etc.).
Correct!

Actually, it is illegal to use a ham rig on the marine or commercial or aircraft bands virtually anywhere in the world, not just in the U.S. The UK, Canada, and the European Union countries all have published standards, as do a number of other countries. See, e.g., Air Waves - Issue 4
(scroll to "News From the MCA").


It's really pretty simple to understand:

If you're a licensed ham, you can use just about any radio equipment in existence -- including your own homebuilt sets -- on the ham bands for which you are licensed. And, only on those bands. The idea is that as a licensed ham you have demonstrated some technical knowledge, and you are responsible for your emissions and must see that they don't cause harmful interference with other stations.

If you're going to operate on the marine SSB bands, you must have: (1) a marine operator's license -- at least the Restricted one; (2) the radio must be type-accepted for use on the marine bands; and (3) you must have a marine station license, covering the use of that equipment.

That a ham radio can be made to operate on frequencies used by other services -- marine, commercial, aircraft, etc. -- is irrelevant as far as the regulations go. With very few exceptions (perhaps MARS/CAP operation, with proper authorization and, of course, in a bona fide life-threatening emergency situation), such operation is illegal. Which is not to say that a number of boats don't do it more or less routinely.

Bill

Last edited by btrayfors; 04-10-2008 at 11:11 AM.
btrayfors is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 34 Old 04-10-2008
STARBOARD!!
 
KeelHaulin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,662
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
Right... However there are a few FCC certified dual-purpose SSB/HAM radios; and you must have both SSB and HAM license to operate the radio on all of it's available frequencies. I think the ICOM M-802 has a dual-band version; but I don't think it transmits on all of the HF bands that you would get if you bought a dedicated HAM unit. I think that's part of the reason why HAM operators "open up" the frequencies on a non-Marine unit (via modification) to get the additional Marine bands; so they don't have to buy two radios.
KeelHaulin is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 34 Old 04-10-2008
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 87
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Gentlemen, I think we digress. The thread started with a request for basic information on the various radio types for listening to weather forecasts, and a basic outline of the different types of radios. As quoted below:

I have been searching sailnet for the best way to keep informed of the weather if you are a budget minded cruiser, but while the topic has been touched on in reference to other issues, I couldn't find it directly addressed. I am under the impression that HF radio is a good way to go, but when I look into those they seem pretty pricey. What I don't understand is why shortwave radios are so much cheaper. Isn't high frequency and short wavelength descriptions of the same type of wave? Could I just buy a cheapish shortwave radio and pick up weather forecasts from the Coast Guard? Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I need this one explained. Thanks.

He also stated that this needs to be done on the cheap. Unfortunately, he didn't specify if he was cruising inland, coastal, or blue water. I get the impression what he needs is a $30 NOAA weather radio receiver for coastal / inland use (or perhaps a cheap VHF), but that is a guess. Now we are all discussing WEFAX, type acceptance, and international licensure. Please note the we I'm not trying to flame anybody, I've been part of this conversation, too.

So, that being said, JimmieB. What type of cruising are you anticipating? Do you need something that can transmit, or is a receiver adequate? Knowing that would be very helpful to determine what you really need.

Personally, I use my handheld VHF for inland and coastal. I have a Grundig Yachtboy 400 SSB / AM / FM shortwave receiver (~$200 new) and a Yaesu FT-817 ham transceiver (~$600 new) as well, but the VHF (< $100) gets me what I need easily and quickly. Blue water is a completely different conversation, though.
mjrogers is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
High-Frequency Radio Basics Kathy Barron Seamanship Articles 0 10-14-2000 09:00 PM
High-Frequency Radio Basics Kathy Barron Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-14-2000 09:00 PM
High-Frequency Radio Basics Kathy Barron Her Sailnet Articles 0 10-14-2000 09:00 PM
Choosing and Installing an SSB Radio Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 09-28-2000 09:00 PM
Choosing and Installing an SSB Radio Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 09-28-2000 09:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome