Ryobi vs. Makita vs. Poliglow?? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 04-16-2008
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Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Halekai, do you have the time frame on the deterioration shown in your first picture? And do you know which of the "miracle" coatings it was?

Our poliglow is definitely subject to wear and abrasion, as is any finish, and does have to be kept up, as does any finish other than good paint (and even that needs some TLC after a bit)
The boat looked beautiful the year before and I had assumed that it had been Awlgripped. By August of the next season it looked like the picture. The majority of the blotchyness is from the mooring ball rubbing the hull and the dinghy rubbing the hull.

I was told what the coating was but can't remember which one it was so I will only say it was an acrylic coating...
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  #12  
Old 04-16-2008
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I wouldn't disregard Ryobi, I did custom woodwork for about 12yrs, ( doors,casing,base,crowns,stairs and railings ) and 99% of it was done with ryobi, with hatachi being the compond saw of choice.

Today, all my tools used for woodworking on the boat are Ryobi.

Ryobi has been around a lot longer than Home Depot, so don't let the HD label distract you
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Old 04-16-2008
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tigerregis has a little shameless behaviour in the past
The instructions on the 3M bottle tell the user what pad to use (theirs) and what speed to use. Obviously you have never worked for a boat restorer or you would investigate before you show your ignorance. This is the absolute last piece of F***ing info I give to this site.
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Old 04-16-2008
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Check the attitude dude. We may not all agree but civility must rule
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Old 04-16-2008
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The instructions on the 3M bottle tell the user what pad to use (theirs) and what speed to use. Obviously you have never worked for a boat restorer or you would investigate before you show your ignorance. This is the absolute last piece of F***ing info I give to this site.

Um.. Who are you talking to and what are you talking about??

What's with the tude??

OK here it goes more "ignorance"...

Point #1: You absolutely, positively 100% DO NOT have to use 3M pads with 3M compounds to get great results. Of course they would like you to so they make more money but there are better quality pads out there than 3M. I personally use some 3M pads, some Lake Country pads and some Presta pads. The Presta and Lake Country pads are uniformly better in consistency and generally yield better results even with 3M products than my 3M pads do....

Lake Country CCS Buffing Pads



I guess it's good that you won't be giving advice seeing as it's incorrect with teh product labeling you actually referenced and you clearly have an attitude problem.

Point #2: You said "3200 RPM" and "3M compound"?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerregis View Post
A proper 3200rpm and 3M compound will do the trick. You can go further with glazing compound.
It's strikingly funny to me how the directions on 3M Rubbing compound, you referenced, clearly state 1000 to 2500 depending upon the pad NOT 3200RPM. The directions on 3M compounds, like their pad reference, are perhaps for revenue generation. Let's see? Speed equals heat, heat dries compounds, compound and pad begin to grab/burn, user uses more 3M compound!! Brilliant marketing don't you think!!

Ever seen 3M advise the use of a misting bottle or regular old water to keep the pad wet while working? No, because the higher the speed you use the more compound you use! Think about it.. Sure I can use my machine at 2500 - 3000 rpm's but why? There is NO reason to use such speeds, especially as a novice, other than to use more compound.

Just for your knowledge, and because I'm guessing the expletive was directed at me, my history is as follows:

Grew up restoring concourse quality antique Porsche automobiles and was wielding a buffer to the 10-12 coats of Nitrocellulose Lacquer at about 13 years of age.

Was chief buffer of all family craft from about 12 or 13 years of age.

Worked from the age of 14 - 17 as a boat yard grunt and of course I was always handed the buffer due to the results I produced.

Worked as a professional boat detailer from age 17-19 again lots of restoration and lots of buffing.

Worked as a 1st mate on "Shiny boats" (Yachts from 55 to 110 feet) through my college years. Again lots of paint care and general maintenance including Imron and Awlgrip. My owners flipped over a single finger print and EVERYTHING HAD TO BE SPOTLESS!!!!

Personally reconditioned the gel coat or paint on over 130 hulls including the 25+ boats I've owned or family, Friends boats and the ones I worked on and got paid for.

No less than three weeks ago did the yearly buff and puff on my dads premier show car a 356 cabrio.. (far more critical and demanding work than the simple buffing of a gel-coated boat)



I guess you're right! I clearly don't know what I'm talking about when I blather on about slow speeds for NOVICES....


Considering I don't know what I'm doing I'll just let my results speak on their own. I re-conditioned this boat last spring. She was last painted with RED Imron in 1989. Not bad for a 17 year old red (the most fade prone color) paint job...


And a gel-coated Catalina:



Go ahead guys buff away at 3200 RPM !!


All the above boats were buffed at speeds bellow 1500 RPM's! For novices I still recommend speeds bellow 1000 rpm's but it's your choice...

P.S. The following professional circular buffers have speed ratings as follows:

Makita 9227C........ ... 600 - 3000 rpm
DeWalt 849............. 1000 - 3000 rpm
The FLEX LK603VVB.. 1000 - 3000 rpm
Milwaukee 5460-6.......600 - 1750 rpm
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 04-16-2008 at 10:28 PM.
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Old 04-16-2008
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Me thinks Tigerregis confused SailNet for Sailing Anarchy (he's a member there as well...)
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Old 04-16-2008
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I used said Ryobi with there terri cloth pad on my deck last weekend, along with the 3M Heavy oxidation/wax combo. It did not turn out too bad frankly. BUT, I will admit, to thinking about getting a DeWalt varible speed 6-9" angle grinder style machine, and get a buffing pad for it. As I was having some issues with the pad not turning with any pressure added to the machine. Only reason for a dewalt vs say a makita or other brand machine, Is I have a number of that brands tools I use in my construction biz, and have found them to work just fine for me. I do have a ryobi or two, that work ok, but definetly a level or two below dewalt/makita etc.

But overall, it did work. I did not try the sheepskin style pad as of yet.

I am also not sure where Tigerregis got his problem, other than a bad day?!?!?!?!?!

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Old 04-16-2008
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Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
Only reason for a dewalt vs say a makita or other brand machine, Is I have a number of that brands tools I use in my construction biz, and have found them to work just fine for me. I do have a ryobi or two, that work ok, but definetly a level or two below dewalt/makita etc.

Marty

Marty,

The DeWalt model 849 is a great, bullet proof machine for a knowledgeable user and it's quite heavy. My only issue with it is that the slowest speed is 1000 RPM, which for novices, on certain finishes, can be too much.

The Makita has a range from 600 (no load speed) to 3000rpm and it's slightly lighter which is nice for boats and working overhead.

Again, both are great but I'd put the DeWalt in the experienced user class and the Makita bridges both novices and experts..
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 04-16-2008 at 10:25 PM.
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  #19  
Old 04-16-2008
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Old 04-16-2008
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Damn, Halekai... You're making it tough I was getting close to going the poliglow route and then you go ahead and post more pics of your work that are both beautiful and inspiring and at the same time make my arms ache from thinking about the work that went into achieving results like that. How about a weekend on Long Island?

When I posted this, I knew it was only a matter of time before you responded. As stated in my original post, this is still a choice between doing it quick vs. doing it right. While there's nothing inherently wrong with Poliglow, I'm still a bit hesitant about the concept of coating the hull with plastic (ironic for a fiberglass boat...) -- obviously many people do it and are happy with the results.

Your comparison of the Ryobi to the Makita was where I thought you would net out. For the benefit of others reading this thread, found a great deal on a Makita 9227 at National Tool Warehouse at National Tool Warehouse - 7” Electric Polisher/Sander with FREE 21” Bag, Compound Pad, and Polishing Pad. $172.95 including a hook and loop pad and compound and polishing pads. Shipping is $9.95 anywhere in the U.S.

Thanks for your input and inspiring photographs. I'm spending waaay too much time thinking this one through.
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