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post #11 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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You may want to just bite the bullet and pull the chainplates. You can do them one at a time and if you discover that the first one or two have real issues, then maybe think about arranging to have the stick pulled, if necessary, to replace them all.
If you don't see any problems (and you might want to use a dye test), then just clean them up, replace the bolts and re install them.

You will sleep better for awhile.
Pulling chainplates is virgually impossible because of how they are built and attached. I would have to do major cutting of all sorts of things, including my main bulkhead - and that's just not a good idea. I considered pulling just one, but even that's pretty tough - bolts are glassed in and I would have to dremel them all out or some such, to do that.

I am going by what these things look like from where I can see them, plus whatever limited view I get while rebedding them (plus the fact that they were pretty dry, at least recently).

It's a wash but I have to weigh thousands of dollars of work to remove and then reinstall them (and certain areas never being the same after that) vs. potential damage. Tough choice for sure, for now I just let them stay put.
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post #12 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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Here is a question? Can dye test be done with chainplate in place?
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post #13 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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Brak-

Probably not, since the area probably most affected by corrosion is the area that is hidden from view, and buried in the hull.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brak View Post
Here is a question? Can dye test be done with chainplate in place?
You can dye test the parts you can see I guess.

Who is the builder of your boat? What model? What year?
Some chain plates are easy to remove some are very difficult.
None are impossible.
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post #15 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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Oh well, I tried

I guess I'll have to rely on chance and appearance on this one. It would probably take my boat out of comission for a year and cost many a thou to replace chainplates anyway. They are not flat pieces of metal, unfortunately, but specifically shaped and consist of two perpendicular welded pieces.
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post #16 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead View Post
You can dye test the parts you can see I guess.

Who is the builder of your boat? What model? What year?
Some chain plates are easy to remove some are very difficult.
None are impossible.
Hallberg Rassy Rasmus, 1972.

The plates are as I mentioned above - one piece of metal goes through the deck, parallel to the boat sides. It is welded inside to the other piece that is perpendicular and is bolted to either bases glassed to the hull or to the main bulkhead. Bases are made of treated plywood glassed from outside (I think one layer of cloth on each surface) and nuts on the bolts are epoxied over. For the plates that are bolted to main bulkhead nuts are not accessible at all since bulkhead is essentially double - one plywood piece to which chainplates are bolted, and then where the nuts are it is covered by another plywood bulkhead with veneer, so to get to those I'd have to cut through the visible bulkhead and then it would never look decent again.

It's been constructed in a way that is not conducive to taking apart. I was able to dremel out one of the fastening bolts after half a day of work. I pulled it, looked at it and decided to put it all back together.

I think dye testing what's visible may not be a bad idea. The entire weld between two chainplate parts is visible and I'd be worried about it more than about what's in the deck. Where would I go for such a test?
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post #17 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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So…. Is the general consensus, “when in doubt replace?” I’m asking because my new (to me) 80 Catalina is box stock and it appears while the boat was well cared for, most everything is original…

I know there isn’t a lot of stress on a Catalina 22 rigging but better safe than sorry?

What say you all?

BTW.. Catalina Direct sells the whole rigging for $375.00

Thanks

1980 S/K Catalina 22 # 9846

1988 Seaward Fox
no name yet (it's in pieces!)
Coconut Grove, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brak View Post
Hallberg Rassy Rasmus, 1972.

The plates are as I mentioned above - one piece of metal goes through the deck, parallel to the boat sides. It is welded inside to the other piece that is perpendicular and is bolted to either bases glassed to the hull or to the main bulkhead. Bases are made of treated plywood glassed from outside (I think one layer of cloth on each surface) and nuts on the bolts are epoxied over. For the plates that are bolted to main bulkhead nuts are not accessible at all since bulkhead is essentially double - one plywood piece to which chainplates are bolted, and then where the nuts are it is covered by another plywood bulkhead with veneer, so to get to those I'd have to cut through the visible bulkhead and then it would never look decent again.

It's been constructed in a way that is not conducive to taking apart. I was able to dremel out one of the fastening bolts after half a day of work. I pulled it, looked at it and decided to put it all back together.

I think dye testing what's visible may not be a bad idea. The entire weld between two chainplate parts is visible and I'd be worried about it more than about what's in the deck. Where would I go for such a test?
On a few occasions, we have installed outboard chainplates, (bolted to the hull), when removal and re installation of the existing chainplates was impractical.
This is a personal decision that only an owner can make but when your chainplates start breaking it becomes easier to decide.
In my opinion, appearance should not be a major contributing factor when it comes to safety.
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post #19 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead View Post
On a few occasions, we have installed outboard chainplates, (bolted to the hull), when removal and re installation of the existing chainplates was impractical.
This is a personal decision that only an owner can make but when your chainplates start breaking it becomes easier to decide.
In my opinion, appearance should not be a major contributing factor when it comes to safety.
Outboard chainplates would not work because of layout and construction. If I replace these - I'd have to replace them with something of the same type. Appearance may not be important but cost certainly is. Seriously, though, would a rigging company be able to do dye testing? Or do I need a specialized metal shop or some such?
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post #20 of 39 Old 05-15-2008
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Brak, a competent rigger OR machine shop should be able to do a dye test. Or Magnaflux, or other technologies and brand name crack/stress tests. The dye test isn't hard, you can buy kits on the internet. Basically, you clean the parts, spray on the dye, wipe it off. Spray on the 'developer', hit a black light, and see if there are any lines glowing.

All depends on what your local options are, and how many fittings and pieces you want to pull off the boat and send out how far.
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