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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #31  
Old 05-16-2008
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Tom—

It could be the original rigging, and it might be fine... on my friend's C&C 38, the rod rigging is over 30 years old...and fine as far as anyone can tell.

But if you were going to go on a long voyage, where you'd be far from help and easy access to modern facilities and supplies, then you would probably want to either carry enough replacement gear that you could exercise repairs in the case of a failure, or have the rigging replace before leaving.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #32  
Old 05-16-2008
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We have just removed all of our chainplates on a 1988 Brewer, they looked fine but it's what is between the decking where you find the problems. We had at least three out of the twelve that definitely had visible small cracks where they passed through the deck. You would never be able to dye test this area of the chainplate to test without removing them. Being twenty years old and having spent at least a couple of years in the south Pacific we felt it was important to pull them; I'm glad we did. I made the new ones myself from 3/8 X 1 3/4 316SS, which is a bit larger than the original. Had them polished and they are ready to be installed next week. Fortunately the boat was built so that they were relatively easy to replace, only very minor destruction of the interior (and two days for two people). The rigger I consulted said that chainplate failure is the #3 reason for dismasting (not sure what #1 & #2 are).

John
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  #33  
Old 05-16-2008
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Sounds like you're making progress, John!

Will you be launching "Blue Moon" soon? No doubt this cold spring has held you up some....
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1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
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  #34  
Old 05-17-2008
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Well, I took a long look at my chainplates today. The parts above deck seem to not have any cracks that I can see (though the hole deformed ever so slightly, it is impossible to see the change in shape, but touching its edge with a finger I can feel the top edge slightly wider - I guess this is due to the size difference between whatever (13mm?) metric hole and 1/2" pins that were used there for its entire life, or may be it was meant to be that way).

Anyway - I am not sure how much this means. I also replaced turnbuckles from AlexanderRoberts with Hayn. If anyone is interested in a set of not quite 8 month old turnbuckle bodies with toggles (lower toggle only) for 1/2" pin - let me know, I will have 6 or 7 of them for sale pretty soon
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  #35  
Old 05-18-2008
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Brak-

If the holes are elongated at all, the chain plates were probably point loaded with a clevis pin that was too small for the hole. This will often lead to the formation of a stress crack at that point... This is one reason that it is very important to use the proper size clevis in a chain plate or tang.

How old are the chainplates?
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #36  
Old 05-18-2008
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As old as the boat - 36 years and counting. They are most certainly somewhat point loaded since they are drilled for metric pins and boat was, at least for the last 20 years or so, used with US hardware (i.e. 1/2" pins). The difference is not much but certainly exists. I specifically looked around that area and found no cracks. I also looked again at how chainplates are attached and now I am certain that the only way I could justify replacing one is outright failure. It's a short rig which pretty much can be held up by just one or two shrouds anyway

Incidentally, there is a weak point in it - essentially a potential single point of failure, but it is not the chainplates (and I am thinking of a way to remedy that, though it would probably entail moving spreaders which I am not looking forward to either).
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Old 05-18-2008
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I'm all for exterior chain plates. Certainly if they have to be stainless.

When stainless is starved - oxygen-wise - you have to take crevice corrosion into the account. This is the reason one shouldn't use stainless under the waterline, unless it's a boat that is most often on a trailer.

[apparently I'm not allowed to post direct links :-( Anyway, copy/paste this into your browser:]

azom.com/details.asp?ArticleID=1177

(it's a good explanation of crevice corrosion and how it adheres to stainless).

Now, If I had to have inboard chainplates, especially with a high stress modern rig (as opposed to a low-stress gaffer or lugger) I would take the chainplates apart, and if they're fine, I'd cover them with lanolin, before screwing them together and then keep replenishing them with lanolin at the top.
I wouldn't skip the taking them off the boat-part, because then your "fix" might actually do more harm than good: Starving the stainless even more.
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  #38  
Old 05-18-2008
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FWIW, there are a few companies that do ultra sonic and eddy current NDT (non destructive testing) of stainless primarily for the aeronautical industry. If it's cost effective to test that would be the absolute best way. You'd most likely have to pull the parts and take it to them.
I'd also think that thermal imaging might be a better than nothing option for chainplates embedded in fiberglass - corroded steel heats differently than sound steel.
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  #39  
Old 06-03-2008
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Here is a link to an interesting article about checking the integrity of chain plates you cannot see.

http://www.irwinyachts.com/Drawings-...hainplates.pdf

Fair winds

LakeEscape
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