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post #1 of 7 Old 05-18-2008 Thread Starter
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Mast Bedding Compound

Although I've been reading the posts for many months now, this is my first posting...so please forgive me if/when I screw things up.

Here is the situation: I have an aluminum mast that needs all the hardware put back on it following painting. Most of the fasteners are stainless steel. I will use aluminum rivets whereever possible, but there'll still be many screws.

The question: What is the best bedding compound to use for the stainless fasteners and what is best for the aluminum rivets?

PS Yes, this is for a J/36 if that makes much of a difference.

PPS I welcome any added advise on restoring the mast as well.
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post #2 of 7 Old 05-18-2008
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Tefgel. It's all most riggers use. Insulate with pieces of light plastic (even a cut up milk carton will do) and use tefgel on all the screws.
Best, Bob S/V Restless
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post #3 of 7 Old 05-18-2008
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I'd second what Steelboat said, and add the following:

If you can't find or get TefGel, you can use Lanocote on the rivets and LocTite on the screws.

BTW, I would highly recommend using STAINLESS STEEL or MONEL rivets, rather than aluminum ones. They're a lot stronger and much more fatigue and corrosion resistant.

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post #4 of 7 Old 05-18-2008
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I have been using a product called Tuff-Gel lately, It's made by the same company that makes Tef-Gel. It seems to be very similar but has a thread locking component in addition to the Teflon.
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post #5 of 7 Old 05-19-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
BTW, I would highly recommend using STAINLESS STEEL or MONEL rivets, rather than aluminum ones. They're a lot stronger and much more fatigue and corrosion resistant.
This is one of the few areas that I disagree with SD.
This is just my opinion.
In general, if you are attaching a stainless piece to a spar. Then use stainless rivets. If you are attaching a aluminum piece. Use aluminum rivets.
If you are installing a plastic conduit inside the spar. Use aluminum rivets.

There are some exceptions but I have never seen any point in introducing dissimilar metals where it's not needed.
If strength is a factor then you may need to use SS or Monel.

I know that if properly coated with a insulating compound you can reduce or perhaps even eliminate electrolysis for awhile. But you will definitely have more of an issue with dissimilar metals.
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Knothead-

I'd agree that avoiding dissimilar metals whenever possible is a good idea. Plastic washers and tefgel/lanocote help with galvanic corrosion issues, but sometimes, using dissimilar metals is really the right way to go.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Knothead-

I'd agree that avoiding dissimilar metals whenever possible is a good idea. Plastic washers and tefgel/lanocote help with galvanic corrosion issues, but sometimes, using dissimilar metals is really the right way to go.
Agreed. Just wanted to say that sometimes aluminum rivets are the way to go.
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