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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 05-23-2008
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the yard should have checked their work prior to releasing it to you.
they should have feild tested it so that you wouldnt be compromised to an unsafe occurance when on your own.
had this been done chances of this happening are unlikey.
also there is the chance they fudged something up- ie; left something loose,forgot to close a bleeder hose or whatever.
if you paid for a pre-season inspection and there was something overlooked or shotty workmanship this should be the yard's problem.
this shouldnt be your problem to figure out.
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  #12  
Old 05-23-2008
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Usually, the simple easiest to fix problems are the most common so don't lose all hope yet. It may be as simple as a loose hose clamp on the hoses that carry the water to the hot water heater. Yanmars are tough and don't fail often.

Yes get the mechanic involved. It could be that he did what he was supposed to but the failure was somewhere else. Large boats are more complicated than houses and cars and there are lots of things that can happen, although they usually don't on a well maintained boat.
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  #13  
Old 05-23-2008
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All good ideas. Another thought... if the engine needed to be cranked for any length of time before starting and the raw water intake was open, there is also the possibility that water was drawn into the engine which might quickly cause a problem (depending on volume, etc.).
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  #14  
Old 05-23-2008
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The symptoms he's describing are overheating, not hydrolocking.
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  #15  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
hydrolocking
Never use the H-word around boat owners.
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  #16  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artbyjody View Post
I had a similar issue when I motored my Barberis from the sellers port to mine. In my event, Dave and I checked out the water strainer filter. Its ridiculously small, and had enough algae in it to clog the suction (water was still coming out the exhaust but in very small amounts). As a result of the smaller amount of water the engine over-heated. Cleaning the filter was all that was needed.

Attachment 1645

Good luck!
Jody,

You really ought to consider replacing that Sesame Street version of a sea strainer with the adult version..
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  #17  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waynemk View Post
so my first boat has broken down with less than 4 hours on it. I bought it with my brother who has owned a boat before and i have crewed with him and done the appropriate classes. its a 95 benneteau 281 with a diesel yanmar.

Was motoring to get the mast stepped for about 10 minutes @60-70% power. The engine sound started to change.......
How come no engine temp alarm on a '95 Benneteau? Or wasn't it working?
Were the gauges working? Why didn't the mechanic prove them. That's just normal maintenance, isn't it?
When I turn my key on the damn thing starts shrieking and there are red lights everywhere.
That tells me that my alarms are working,.... I think..... I don't have gauges.
Just Knothea....I mean idiot lights.

If the sound of an engine changes when you haven't touched anything, shouldn't the first thing you do is find out why? Don't let it shut itself down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by waynemk View Post
....... and i thought something might be up but only have 2 hours of time with the motor so wasn't sure. Well, 30-60 seconds later, the engine cut out and i noticed white smoke venting. Went below to establish i didn't have a fire and the engine compartment was completely full of smoke. vented the compartment and cabin, got a tow in and started to look around. Noticed a lot of green liquid under the engine and no obvious hose leaks.

After letting it cool for a couple of hours, i was able to restart the engine and confirm that water was getting spurted out exhaust. I am thinking its a leak in the closed cooling system, i lost coolant below engine and it shut down due to overheating. Any other ideas?

So in an effort to be prudent, i had yacht yard fully tune and check everything on engine including hose clamps and fluids prior to launch. I don't know when it was done last so do it all was my thought. I am thinking the work that they did failed to prevent this issue and i am wondering if it was done at all. THe oil is new.

I contacted the yacht yard yesterday but the mechanic had left for day. Is it reasonable to ask him to come to the boat to look at it? Its about a 10 minute drive from yard to emergency dockage.

sorry for long rambling post but i am kind of between a rock and a hard place on this and a bit stressed out because i am not sure what best thing to do is. I also wouldn't mind avoiding and expensive tow.

I have considered adding water to closed cooling and running for no more than 5 minutes at a time. Is that super stupid? I haven't figured out how to check that fluid level yet and think it might be a good idea to add just to see if i can find the leak

If you want to become a diesel mechanic, then dig into your system yourself and take some classes and buy some tools and be self sufficient. More power to ya. I respect you for it.
I have sucked enough diesel, and in some of the worst situations, trying to get my engine going, that I know I don't want to be a diesel mechanic.
I figure that if my engine is getting air and fuel and has enough compression, it should run. If it doesn't then I need to find a mechanic. And if I'm shore-side, that's the first thing I'd do.
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  #18  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead View Post
How come no engine temp alarm on a '95 Benneteau? Or wasn't it working?
Were the gauges working? Why didn't the mechanic prove them. That's just normal maintenance, isn't it?
When I turn my key on the damn thing starts shrieking and there are red lights everywhere.
That tells me that my alarms are working,.... I think..... I don't have gauges.
Just Knothea....I mean idiot lights.

If the sound of an engine changes when you haven't touched anything, shouldn't the first thing you do is find out why? Don't let it shut itself down.




If you want to become a diesel mechanic, then dig into your system yourself and take some classes and buy some tools and be self sufficient. More power to ya. I respect you for it.
I have sucked enough diesel, and in some of the worst situations, trying to get my engine going, that I know I don't want to be a diesel mechanic.
I figure that if my engine is getting air and fuel and has enough compression, it should run. If it doesn't then I need to find a mechanic. And if I'm shore-side, that's the first thing I'd do.
I am not dissagreeing with you per se, but I guess I have always had a different philosophy about that. I always try and fix it myself. If (when... smile) I get stuck, I start asking questions. I read through it.

I don't do that because I am cheap (well, sometimes I am!!!), but I do it because engines NEVER fail at home. They don't fail in the slip. They fail when you are away from it. Often you may be able to get a tow or sail yourself in. Other times, it is much more critical and time is the essense.

Knowing how to fix most of the basic problems on your diesel seems like good seamanship to me. If you are just a lake sailor... maybe, maybe not. But for anyone on the coast and especially those with further aspirations should be able to do their own stuff for safety's sake.

These are just my opinions.

- CD

PS A little note that hangs above my dealer's door:

Service: $75/hour.

Service if you want to watch: $100/hour.

Service if you want to watch and ask questions: $125/hour

Service if you want to help: $150/hour.

HEHEHEHEHE!! It was quite funny (but true) I thought.
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  #19  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halekai36 View Post
Jody,

You really ought to consider replacing that Sesame Street version of a sea strainer with the adult version..

I bought a much larger one but I have not installed it yet
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  #20  
Old 05-23-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
I am not dissagreeing with you per se, but I guess I have always had a different philosophy about that. I always try and fix it myself. If (when... smile) I get stuck, I start asking questions. I read through it.

I don't do that because I am cheap (well, sometimes I am!!!), but I do it because engines NEVER fail at home. They don't fail in the slip. They fail when you are away from it. Often you may be able to get a tow or sail yourself in. Other times, it is much more critical and time is the essense.

Knowing how to fix most of the basic problems on your diesel seems like good seamanship to me. If you are just a lake sailor... maybe, maybe not. But for anyone on the coast and especially those with further aspirations should be able to do their own stuff for safety's sake.

These are just my opinions.
As usual, my point was stated better than I could say it.
That was exactly what I was trying to say.
I know how to fix most of the basic problems on your diesel, .....and usually I have to access this knowledge at the most inconvenient times.

So, If I am dockside, I'm calling a mechanic.

Your point is well taken CD, it would be irresponsible to use a piece of equipment without taking the time to become familiar with the basic workings and have a modicum of first hand experience with it.
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