A wet bilge is MORE than just a nuisance ! - Page 2 - SailNet Community
 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 63 Old 05-25-2008 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Maine Sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,873
Thanks: 19
Thanked 218 Times in 166 Posts
Rep Power: 16
       
Xort..

I too have a keel stepped mast but I created a mast sump or mast catch basin. My mast sump is separated from the rest of the bilge and I drain after a rain or fog. Yes I get water down my mast but usually not much more than a quart after a good rain. You are right that there is no way to seal off the mast but you can catch it if you're creative.

As for your AC you can use a condensate pump and discharge the condensate overboard instead of into the bilge.

If I'm not mistaken though I thought you were on the lakes. While crevice corrosion does occur in fresh water it is reportedly somewhat less aggressive.

Having been through a keel re-set and keel bolt replacement due to a leaking keel to hull joint that resulted in severe crevice corrosion I now take keeping my bilge dry a lot more seriously...

Even back in 1998 it ran me huge money and I did a large chunk of the labor myself...

Believe me, I bought my boat last spring, and it took me all summer to isolate every leak, whether fresh or salt water and put an end to them. I had a couple of annoying ones that took a while to find but I finally did.

______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Maine Sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 63 Old 05-25-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
There are so many other reasons to keep your bilge as dry as possible... osmosis, galvanic corrosion between the mast step and keel-stepped mast foot, keel bolts, etc...

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
moderate?
 
camaraderie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 16
     
All good reasons for an encapsulated keel!
T37Chef likes this.

No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
camaraderie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: wherever
Posts: 5,283
Thanks: 8
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 11
     
I have a lead encapsulated keel!

And I'm in fesh water, for now!

But I still want a dry bilge.

Halekai, thanks for the answer. Is there something specific you're referring to when you mention 'condensate pump'?

I have been eyeballing my mast step and considering blocking off that area to create a sump. The forward A/C drains there too. Thinking of putting a shower sump type pump there. Only thing to figure out is where to drain it. The forward head is nearby. One thing I'm puzzled by is that the forward sink drain seems to go straight down to the hull. Wouldn't water back up there? I expected the sink drain to go through the topsides of the hull.
xort is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 63 Old 05-26-2008 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Maine Sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,873
Thanks: 19
Thanked 218 Times in 166 Posts
Rep Power: 16
       
Quote:
Originally Posted by xort View Post
I have been eyeballing my mast step and considering blocking off that area to create a sump. The forward A/C drains there too. Thinking of putting a shower sump type pump there. Only thing to figure out is where to drain it. The forward head is nearby. One thing I'm puzzled by is that the forward sink drain seems to go straight down to the hull. Wouldn't water back up there? I expected the sink drain to go through the topsides of the hull.
Yeah, all you need is a shower pump or a small bilge pump and float switch. The AC could possibly drain into the same sump as the mast and you could then Y into your bilge discharge hose or sink drain. I always close my seacocks so the sink drain is not a place I'd drain a sump to..

______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Maine Sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
Handsome devil
 
Stillraining's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: LaConner,Washington
Posts: 3,477
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by halekai36 View Post
But, I've removed the nuts, checked the threads and I know the keel to hull joint is bone dry and my keel bolts don't leak. My boat has been in the water for a couple of weeks and my bilge still has dust in it.....
Thanks for the info Main...I figured as much as far as melting in new bolts...
One thing though you say you took off your nuts and (washers) to inspect them...But clearly the crevice corrosion in your photos is past the hull and in the space between hull and keel..do you feel confidant that your inspection revealed all that much and there are no issues beyond what you can see?...I thought of backing mine off too but then wondered if it would really be of any real indication?...I know there is a process to x-ray chain plates within the hull and was wondering if this was a viable x-ray inspection process as well for our keel bolts?

Again appreciate all you contribute to this forum.
Stillraining is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
X-raying the hull/keel join and lead are kind of mutually exclusive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillraining View Post
Thanks for the info Main...I figured as much as far as melting in new bolts...
One thing though you say you took off your nuts and (washers) to inspect them...But clearly the crevice corrosion in your photos is past the hull and in the space between hull and keel..do you feel confidant that your inspection revealed all that much and there are no issues beyond what you can see?...I thought of backing mine off too but then wondered if it would really be of any real indication?...I know there is a process to x-ray chain plates within the hull and was wondering if this was a viable x-ray inspection process as well for our keel bolts?

Again appreciate all you contribute to this forum.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
Handsome devil
 
Stillraining's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: LaConner,Washington
Posts: 3,477
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
     
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
X-raying the hull/keel join and lead are kind of mutually exclusive.
Ya Dog, I knew about the lead issue but was thinking of coming at it from an angel that might get the space above the lead and below the hull.
Stillraining is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
It really depends on where the hull-keel join is then... in many boats there wouldn't have clearance above to get the xray machine head in there.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 63 Old 05-26-2008
Sea Slacker
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,789
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Keel bolts can be in weird places. For example, keel wings on my old Beneteau (back 10 years ago or so) were apparently attached using bolts to the main keel part. One day we hit underwater rock - and then found on the next haul out that the wings were gone. Looks like they were sheared off by the power of impact - but bolts were probably not in great shape by then. This was an expensive insurance repair job.
brak is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Devising a Better Bilge Pump Don Casey Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 06-02-2002 08:00 PM
Devising a Better Bilge Pump Don Casey Cruising Articles 0 06-02-2002 08:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome