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  #31  
Old 09-28-2008
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Now that is just unfair Still...perhaps you're feeling left out? Here's some space age technology for you to help you stop dropping stuff in your wet bilge! Perhaps now, you'll recognize my links as simply a service I am trying to provide to my fellow sailors who constantly struggle with so many problems.

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  #32  
Old 09-28-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midlifesailor View Post
First my question. what do people do to remove the last bit of water the bilge pump won't remove? I've seen the combination boat hook/manual pump but at around $50 it seems a rather expensive option. Anybody have any ideas to quickly remove that last bit of water? I have a traditional stuffing box, keel stepped mast and AC dumping condensate into the bilge, but want to try to keep it as dry as I can, and hope there is something a bit quicker and easeir than using a turkey baster.

I generally keep two 'tools' on the boat, a small wetvac, and a hair dryer, the wet vac is usefull for many other things, as a blower it will start charcoal very quickly, and inflates air mattresses and kids inflatable toys, helps speed drying of wet clothes etc if you vacuum the water out. For pillows and cushions, put them in a plastic bag and tape the neck of the bag around the nozzle, it'll collapse the bag and suck the water out. They can't realy be beat for cleaning and drying out a boat. Also gets air moving in the boat to air it out fast if you put the hose on the exhaust and stick it through a port
The hair dryer will help start carbed engnes in cold weather, warm the carb and the engine starts easily, usefull anywhere you want warm air quickly.

Granted, for most you need AC power, but while I haven't tried them, I'v seen a few that are made for DC use.

Ken.
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  #33  
Old 09-28-2008
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It's made in Germany...They always make the best stuff...You hear what I'm tellin' ya'!!

Maybe my boat(s) are/were strange but there is a point before a sponge or even a GASP! Sham-Wow would be the tool of choice.

Maybe I'll just spring for the combo boat hook pump thingy at the boat show this year to suction out that last 1/2" of water before I hit it with my Sham-wow.

Ken,
Thanks for the idea. I have a mini wet-dry shop vac on board, but my wife might throw a fit if I used it to vaccum water out of the bilge, but I may give it a try though.
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Last edited by PalmettoSailor; 09-28-2008 at 03:48 PM.
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  #34  
Old 09-28-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midlifesailor View Post
my wife might throw a fit if I used it to vaccum water out of the bilge, but I may give it a try though.
Just make sure you don't have any gasoline (or gas) floating on the water when you suck it out. These vacuums react very badly with gasoline/gas and are likely to light up your life (amongst other things)
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  #35  
Old 12-03-2010
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(Ya, I know it's an old thread...)

I thought that I should share a couple of pictures that Illustrate this point.

One of the boats I was looking at had "some" moisture in the bilge (actually, most). The owner periodically pumped it out, or let the bilge pump handle it. I'll tell you now that I eventually bought this boat, and will live with the consequences.

When I went to look at the boat, with the intent of purchasing, here is what the bilge looked like (unfortunately it still looks a lot like this today):


and here are the keel bolts;



Not too bad - or so I thought...

I eventually made an offer on this boat, and when it went to survey here is what the keel looked like;
Pre powerwash;


Post powerwash;


Something struck me as odd about the keel, and the way that it sat in relation to the hull... After much insistence to the surveyor, and the broker, and the owner, and the yard manager, the surveyor checked it out...

Sure enough, the keel was loose, and the bottom would move about ľ" from side to side. Not a lot, but enough to kill the deal.

The owner faced with this prospect wisely decided to repair the problem and go from there. He had the keel dropped, and here is what we saw;








Four of the seven bolts were TOAST

The owner paid over $9500 to have this situation addressed by the yard.

The yard sent the keel out to I Broomfield & Son in Providence, RI. I asked them about their procedure, and this is what they said;
Quote:
When replacing keel bolts, we melt the lead around the bolt, remove the old
bolt (which is usually 304 SS), and replace it with a new bolt (316SS). The
lead is replaced and the keel is faired and painted around the area. The
cost is $450.00 per bolt. Depending upon the time of year, the number of
bolts that need replacing and how busy we are it usually takes about 4-6
weeks. This price does not include freight. The re-attaching of your keel
is usually taken care of at the boat yard, this is something that we are not
involved with at all.
The yard reattached the keel by first bedding it in 5200, and then lowering the boat onto the keel. Then they wrapped the keel in fiberglass & epoxy, and refaired the keel. Here is a pic AFTER the fix;


Wet bilge = BAD
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  #36  
Old 12-03-2010
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What kind of a boat was it? $9500 sounds like it might be half the price
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  #37  
Old 12-04-2010
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I didn't get an itemized bill but;
Keel bolts: $450 * 7 = $3150
Dropping and rebedding the keel (4500lbs) plus 60 miles (round trip) for the keel: ~$6350

Sounds about right...
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Old 12-04-2010
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Wow...this thread scares me. The keel bolts on mine are so badly corroded away that some could pierce a barefoot if someone stepped on them. I've asked around quite a bit and was told that I could drill into the keel from the bilge and insert 18" SS lag bolts and torque them down to 150 lbs.

Has anyone ever done the repair with lag bolts? What are you thoughts?
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  #39  
Old 12-04-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SailingWebGuy View Post
I've asked around quite a bit and was told that I could drill into the keel from the bilge and insert 18" SS lag bolts and torque them down to 150 lbs.

Has anyone ever done the repair with lag bolts? What are you thoughts?
I would recommend against bandaid solutions to something as critical as the keel. Take the boat to a good yard and let them fix it properly. Remember, the keel isn't likely to fall off on a sunny day with a gentle breeze. It will probably fail when the boat (and crew) is being stressed. Loosing the keel could spoil your entire day.
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Old 12-04-2010
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Bad idea... much better to farm the work out and have the keel bolts replaced properly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SailingWebGuy View Post
Wow...this thread scares me. The keel bolts on mine are so badly corroded away that some could pierce a barefoot if someone stepped on them. I've asked around quite a bit and was told that I could drill into the keel from the bilge and insert 18" SS lag bolts and torque them down to 150 lbs.

Has anyone ever done the repair with lag bolts? What are you thoughts?
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