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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 05-30-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papasailor View Post
You spoke of tripping on the furling line or they were laying on your deck. Don't you have the dual rollers mounted on your stanchions to keep the line off your deck? If you do, check the rollers for wear when you replace the line. The rollers get scalloped.

If you give up on splicing, (I did) and have a line done professionally, then off course you need to get it over the forestay, which means disconnecting the furler completely, (removing the extrusion attachment parts to raise is above the turnbuckle). Oh and it's a good idea to use the jib halyard as a temporary forestay so the mast doesn't fall down.

It is definitely a two many job. The forestay with aluminum extension and furling gear is heavy. You'd have to be superman to hold up the forestaay and exttursion with one hand, disconnect the stay and loop the line around it with the other.

If Tom does decide to have a rigger splice the line I would recommend that he have the rigger come to the boat and do it in place if that is at all possible.
The length of the line can be important. If you are sailing alone you want to be able to handle it from the helm and not have a big mess in the cockpit.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JSL3
Tom,
I have the same boat as you and the same furling system. I am a relatively new owner of this boat - I bought it last summer. Last weekend I needed to replace 2 stanchions that were cracked. To do that I had to de-splice (not correct term I'm sure) or remove the splice to feed the line through the stanchions. I ended up removing the line completely including removing it from the furler. What I did may answer a couple of your questions.

Threading the line back through the furler was very easy. There is no need to take it apart, just feed it through and rotate the drum. If you want to take the drum apart for inspection, that is another matter. It isn't necessary however for simply rethreading.
Re-splicing (my version of re-splicing) was easy as well. I'm sure this is not the correct way to do it and not very seaman like but if you are looking for an inexpensive and practical way to do this, this might serve you. As I took apart the original splice (presumably either 20 years old or at sometime changed by the previous owner), I noticed that it was simply a double braid line with the core of one end inside the jacket of another in about a 6 inch overlap. The whole splice (through jacket and core) was stiched together to hold it fast. When I put the splice back together I simply inserted the core of one end back into the jacket of the other and stiched it back up. It seems to be holding fine. Again to be clear, I know this probably isn't the best way to splice a continuous furling line but since the forces on this line aren't too great, it may get you out of a pinch if you have the same type of line.

JSL3, not to argue with you, but sometimes the forces on the furling line are considerable.
If you never use your system to reef or try to furl the sail when it's full, then I suppose you can avoid putting much strain on it. But if you want to roll the sail up part way and keep sailing, there will be a lot of strain on the line.
The last thing you would want is to have the splice come apart when you are trying to furl the sail in tight quarters or when the wind pipes up.
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  #12  
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Knot,
No argument here. What you say makes perfect sense. It could be quite a handful to have the line part in high winds. On this boat, I have experienced 25kt winds with the jib furled part way and noticed no problems with the splice but I will continue to watch out for it. When sailing partially furled, I suppose it also makes a difference if the splice is on the load side or the slack side of the drum. Right?
Thanks for the advice.
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Arf,
I ran into the problem of the fig not wanting to pass up the cover. I managed to get that part done by first pulling as much core down, loosening the cover some and then rather than going the whole distance up the cover at one time, I went up maybe half the distance and then came out of the cover, pulled the fid and core until the slack was out then went back in the exact space that the fig came out of and went the rest of the way. I think the NER instructions cover that somewhere.
Let us know how you make out.
Knot,
Thanks for your tip on splicing. I had trouble because I usually ended up having too much cover around the eye when I was done. I will try your suggestion next time.
BP
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Whoa came back from working on another little surprise package project on the boat (compass cylinder) to see all this activity on the furler. Great!

Answering PapaSailor first: The double blocks are shackled to bails at the bottom of the stanchions and lay on the deck and pull inward--nothing wrong with them, just a crappy setup. If I have a rigger do the job, he (or she) will be coming to the boat with the cut line already in place, so no issues with forestay.

Tom
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Knot:

Thanks for continuing my education--I sort of got what you were splaining to me. I need to try another to apply it--appreciate the tip on stitching the crossover.

Maybe my practice piece is the wrong type--I'll try to attach a picture of it with the white core out below--it's 1/2" and I'm using the Samson 1/2" fid. My 1st prob was getting the shell in the fid well, so it came out in the middle of the job--didn't think of tapering it to help jamb it into the end of the fid. But I did try bunching up the other shell toward the fid as I tried to work the fid in on top of the other core but it was ridiculously tight.

What type of line do you recommend I use for the real project? The Hood doc recommends 7/16" Yale ULS. I take it this is an ultra low stretch line, so should I use maybe Sta-set? What kind of probs can I expect with that?

Thanks again.

Tom
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Replacing Furling Line on Hood Seafurl 810-practice_piece.jpg  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arf145 View Post
Knot:

Thanks for continuing my education--I sort of got what you were splaining to me. I need to try another to apply it--appreciate the tip on stitching the crossover.

Maybe my practice piece is the wrong type--I'll try to attach a picture of it with the white core out below--it's 1/2" and I'm using the Samson 1/2" fid. My 1st prob was getting the shell in the fid well, so it came out in the middle of the job--didn't think of tapering it to help jamb it into the end of the fid. But I did try bunching up the other shell toward the fid as I tried to work the fid in on top of the other core but it was ridiculously tight.

What type of line do you recommend I use for the real project? The Hood doc recommends 7/16" Yale ULS. I take it this is an ultra low stretch line, so should I use maybe Sta-set? What kind of probs can I expect with that?

Thanks again.

Tom
Tom, when you say you are using a Sampson 1/2" Fid, you don't mean that it's 1/2" diameter do you?
If it is you need to use a smaller Fid.
The line in the photo looks like it should work fine.
Yale ULS was (or is) just a normal double braid but the last time I used it, (years ago), the cover was so loose that the core wanted to pop out around the eye doing a normal eye splice. I always had to stitch around the damn eye to keep it together.
But it was very easy to splice. I think that may be why Hood was recommending it.
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The fid marked 1/2" is 13/32" in diameter. Should I go smaller for that size line? They also have a 7/16" fid that is 6/16" and a 3/8" fid that is 5/16"

'll be going to West Marine for my furling line--should I just get normal db? Is that what you would normally use for a furling line in general? I would have figured a little give in a furling line would be a good thing--a little shock absorption.

Tom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arf145 View Post
The fid marked 1/2" is 13/32" in diameter. Should I go smaller for that size line? They also have a 7/16" fid that is 6/16" and a 3/8" fid that is 5/16"

'll be going to West Marine for my furling line--should I just get normal db? Is that what you would normally use for a furling line in general? I would have figured a little give in a furling line would be a good thing--a little shock absorption.

Tom
Tom, try using the Fid for 7/16". With your 1/2" line and use a 3/8" Fid for the 7/16". Remember to use the proper measurements for the line size.

When you go down to WM, pick up one of NER Fids. Those have a hook thing on the end that will almost certainly keep the line from coming off the Fid.

Just buy their normal Sta-Set or even the econo-braid (all white/no tracer).
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Knothead and BP, I finished my trial run and the results were a bit rugged.

1. My crossover had a gap of 1/2" or so--but then I didn't stitch my test one.

2. Worst thing, ended up with a twist. I'm not sure how that happened.

3. Don't quite understand the tapering step. Once I've threaded the two covers into the other side, I've got a lot of core remaining out of each and less cover remaining out. I'm supposed to go about a rope diam out from the point where cores and covers come out and cut half the strands? Then milk it all in, jerk it between the crossover and the knot, and finally cut all the remainder? I guess that allowed the strands I cut to recede back into the cover?

Tom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arf145 View Post
Knothead and BP, I finished my trial run and the results were a bit rugged.

1. My crossover had a gap of 1/2" or so--but then I didn't stitch my test one.

2. Worst thing, ended up with a twist. I'm not sure how that happened.

3. Don't quite understand the tapering step. Once I've threaded the two covers into the other side, I've got a lot of core remaining out of each and less cover remaining out. I'm supposed to go about a rope diam out from the point where cores and covers come out and cut half the strands? Then milk it all in, jerk it between the crossover and the knot, and finally cut all the remainder? I guess that allowed the strands I cut to recede back into the cover?

Tom
Tom, What is your deadline on completing this project?
I was thinking that it might be fun to make a little video performing the splice and if you have got a few days, I will try to make it next week.
I think you might be surprised at how easy the end to end splice actually is when you see it done.
The problem is that it's a lot easier to show someone than to explain it.
At least for me.
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