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arf145 05-29-2008 10:43 AM

Replacing Furling Line on Hood Seafurl 810
 
Has anyone done this? How hard is it with the unit in place? This is a continuous loop furler. I want new, less intrusive blocks for the line, which means cutting and splicing the line, which means replacing the 20-year-old 7/16" line in the process, which means opening up the housing I guess. So I've gone from a nice, simple, easy looking desire--furling blocks and lines that don't act like tripwires and roller bearings for the feet--to opening up the furler.

Gotta admit I actually have the original owner's manual, but before I disable a nicely working system, I hoped to hear from someone familiar with this furler.

Thanks!

Tom

bruceyp 05-29-2008 10:58 AM

Arf,
I have the same furler and the same problem(s). To do, or not to do, that is the question. Also, can you do an end to end double braid splice? My eye splices ain't that good, what do you think my end to end will look like? Let's see what other responses you get.
Bp

knothead 05-29-2008 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by arf145 (Post 321800)
Has anyone done this? How hard is it with the unit in place? This is a continuous loop furler. I want new, less intrusive blocks for the line, which means cutting and splicing the line, which means replacing the 20-year-old 7/16" line in the process, which means opening up the housing I guess. So I've gone from a nice, simple, easy looking desire--furling blocks and lines that don't act like tripwires and roller bearings for the feet--to opening up the furler.

Gotta admit I actually have the original owner's manual, but before I disable a nicely working system, I hoped to hear from someone familiar with this furler.

Thanks!

Tom


You don't necessarily need to open up the furler.
After cutting and removing the old line, Just feed the taped or melted end of the new one into the groove while rotating the foil.

It probably wouldn't be a bad idea to open it up to make sure all the fasteners are moving and to familiarize yourself with it though.

You will have to make a constant diameter end to end splice. New England Rope as well as many others have the instructions. :)

arf145 05-29-2008 02:31 PM

Of course! Pull the new line through with the old! Brilliant! And yet, for me, Duh. But you're right Knothead, I should look inside--this was a neglected boat when we got it recently, and the manual suggests there's some maintenance in there--mainly flushing and spraying WD40.

It looks like gaining access is just a matter of loosening the cover clamp on the bottom of the sheave cover and dropping the cover? The manual says to watch out not to lose the rope stripper. Should that be it then?

I know it needs a constant diameter splice, and Bp, nope, I don't know how. I went out and got the the Samson fid kit and armed with info from the web and my belief that I can do stuff, proceeded to have a hell of a time on a practice piece of 7/16" double braid. Could not work the fid up that far in the shell once it was past the crossover. My new plan might be to get a rigger to do the splice.

Tom

knothead 05-29-2008 06:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by arf145 (Post 321896)
Of course! Pull the new line through with the old! Brilliant! And yet, for me, Duh. But you're right Knothead, I should look inside--this was a neglected boat when we got it recently, and the manual suggests there's some maintenance in there--mainly flushing and spraying WD40.

It looks like gaining access is just a matter of loosening the cover clamp on the bottom of the sheave cover and dropping the cover? The manual says to watch out not to lose the rope stripper. Should that be it then?

I know it needs a constant diameter splice, and Bp, nope, I don't know how. I went out and got the the Samson fid kit and armed with info from the web and my belief that I can do stuff, proceeded to have a hell of a time on a practice piece of 7/16" double braid. Could not work the fid up that far in the shell once it was past the crossover. My new plan might be to get a rigger to do the splice.

Tom

Tom, it is easy to lose screws and various parts when taking any furling system apart. The rope stripper is just sitting in there so when you separate the components it will fall. So be careful.:)

Go ahead and try the splice. In truth it's easier than a typical eye splice in that it's constant diameter. So you don't have to worry about milking the fat part of the splice into the cover. There shouldn't be a fat part in a constant diameter splice.
The reason I suggested the NER instructions is only because those are what I learned from. There is one main addendum that I made to their directions but it's a little difficult to explain until you start your splice.
Let me know if you decide to try it yourself.

arf145 05-29-2008 11:06 PM

I wouldn't mind hearing your addition to the NER instructions, Knot--that's what I was using when I failed my practice attempt. I used a piece of 1/2" db of unknown make, extracted the cores, had a difficult time of getting the cover into the fid, then just couldn't get the fid tip to the extraction point--way tight in there. Tried pulling the other core out more to make room, but no go.

I'd like to do it myself for the usual reasons, but also so I don't have to schedule someone 2 or 3 weeks out.

Tom

knothead 05-30-2008 07:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by arf145 (Post 322104)
I wouldn't mind hearing your addition to the NER instructions, Knot--that's what I was using when I failed my practice attempt. I used a piece of 1/2" db of unknown make, extracted the cores, had a difficult time of getting the cover into the fid, then just couldn't get the fid tip to the extraction point--way tight in there. Tried pulling the other core out more to make room, but no go.

I'd like to do it myself for the usual reasons, but also so I don't have to schedule someone 2 or 3 weeks out.

Tom

Tom, what kind of line did you purchase? There should be as much material in the core as there is in the cover. Any typical Double braid should work. But there are some types of rope you might have trouble with.

What kind of Fid are you using and what diameter is it? I have made my own Fids but Sampson or NER both are pretty good.

When I attach the Fid to the line what I do is cut the end of the line at an angle about 1/2" to 3/4" long. Then I take a short piece of tape and wrap it tightly so as to make a point. I insert this into my Fid. It can be taped at this point so it doesn't pull out too easily.

I really don't know why you would be having so much trouble passing the Fid through the line.
Are you bunching the line up to increase the diameter when pushing the fid through. Try pulling out a whole bunch of the core. That will bunch it up for you.

As to my little addition to the splice instructions, it's a little difficult to understand until you get to the point of making the final marks on the cores and covers.
If you follow the instructions to the letter, then when you have milked everything back in you will most likely have little hollow spots where there is nothing inside the cover.
That won't really hurt the strength of the splice. It just makes it look crappy.
The key is to make the marks a little closer to the end of the parts you are going to cut off and taper. About a thumbs width.
Remember it's real important to milk everything back into shape before making these final marks.
The reason for the difference is that before cutting and tapering, the core and cover are overlapping at their original size and causing the diameter of the cover at that point to be greater. When you have made your tapers the overlapped area should be the same diameter as the rest of the rope and will have there for gotten longer. The marks you made when the line was shorter would be a little off.

I know that is confusing, Sorry.

knothead 05-30-2008 08:11 AM

Tom, I just thought of one more tip that might help you. I can't remember if it's in the instructions.
Be sure to stitch the crossover, which should be just the two covers, as soon as you have tightened it.
Then you can work with it without worrying about it getting loose.

Also, cross stitch the entire splice after completion for extra strength.

papasailor 05-30-2008 09:23 AM

furler rollers
 
You spoke of tripping on the furling line or they were laying on your deck. Don't you have the dual rollers mounted on your stanchions to keep the line off your deck? If you do, check the rollers for wear when you replace the line. The rollers get scalloped.

If you give up on splicing, (I did) and have a line done professionally, then off course you need to get it over the forestay, which means disconnecting the furler completely, (removing the extrusion attachment parts to raise is above the turnbuckle). Oh and it's a good idea to use the jib halyard as a temporary forestay so the mast doesn't fall down.

It is definitely a two many job. The forestay with aluminum extension and furling gear is heavy. You'd have to be superman to hold up the forestaay and exttursion with one hand, disconnect the stay and loop the line around it with the other.

JSL3 05-30-2008 11:01 AM

Tom,
I have the same boat as you and the same furling system. I am a relatively new owner of this boat - I bought it last summer. Last weekend I needed to replace 2 stanchions that were cracked. To do that I had to de-splice (not correct term I'm sure) or remove the splice to feed the line through the stanchions. I ended up removing the line completely including removing it from the furler. What I did may answer a couple of your questions.

Threading the line back through the furler was very easy. There is no need to take it apart, just feed it through and rotate the drum. If you want to take the drum apart for inspection, that is another matter. It isn't necessary however for simply rethreading.
Re-splicing (my version of re-splicing) was easy as well. I'm sure this is not the correct way to do it and not very seaman like but if you are looking for an inexpensive and practical way to do this, this might serve you. As I took apart the original splice (presumably either 20 years old or at sometime changed by the previous owner), I noticed that it was simply a double braid line with the core of one end inside the jacket of another in about a 6 inch overlap. The whole splice (through jacket and core) was stiched together to hold it fast. When I put the splice back together I simply inserted the core of one end back into the jacket of the other and stiched it back up. It seems to be holding fine. Again to be clear, I know this probably isn't the best way to splice a continuous furling line but since the forces on this line aren't too great, it may get you out of a pinch if you have the same type of line.


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