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Old 06-02-2008
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forestay extension

Has anyone every heard of a stud extender? I envision a stud with 3/8 female thread on one end and 3/8 male on the other. I need about 2" more on my forestay. This would screw over the forestay stud, perhaps with a lock washer and nut to hold it tight. Depending on how long the "extender" was, it would lengthen my forestay.

Does anyone know if such an animal exists?

Althernatively, is there such a thing as a extra long turnbuckle body?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papasailor View Post
Has anyone every heard of a stud extender? I envision a stud with 3/8 female thread on one end and 3/8 male on the other. I need about 2" more on my forestay. This would screw over the forestay stud, perhaps with a lock washer and nut to hold it tight. Depending on how long the "extender" was, it would lengthen my forestay.

Does anyone know if such an animal exists?

Althernatively, is there such a thing as a extra long turnbuckle body?
Perhaps you could just add an Eye-Jaw toggle (sometimes called a Fixed Toggle), to the bottom of the turnbuckle.

Steve
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I think the eye-jaw toggle would be the way to go.
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not an option

The eye jaw toggle extender will not work. It raises the bottom housing of the furling too high from the tang. Even under tension, it makes the furling gear wobbly.

I am still looking for solutions to extending the forstay. I could use the eye jaw at the top, but I don't have access to a gin pole or a light enough plus strong enough volenteer to go up in the bosun's chair. The weight of the forstay and furling extrusion is heavy just by itself. (A halyard would act as a temp jib)

Taking the pin out of the mast head, holding the forestay with one hand, using another hand to put on the eye jaw, while growing yet another hand to insert pin, cotter pin finally pulling the whole thing up to align with the mast head.

the real solution is of course a new, longer forestay but that involves taking the forstay and extrusion down, puttin in new wire and then getting it back up. All the same obstacles exist as with adding the eye at top.

And finally, I am trying to do all of this on a limited budget. As an not too good alternative, I could race with my mast raked forward and not expect too much performance or pointing.
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I would look for a longer shackle at the bottom and solve the "wobbly" business rather than have another set of threads to rely on.
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This was done on my boat using a turnbuckle and then adding link plates on the sides (to avoid wobblyness and generally to make furler drum reasonably steady). Link plates were just added and it seems to work well so far.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papasailor View Post
The eye jaw toggle extender will not work. It raises the bottom housing of the furling too high from the tang. Even under tension, it makes the furling gear wobbly.
I've never heard of anyone complaining of a wobbly furling gear.

I have had customers complain about too much deflection and the inability to get as much tension on the wire as they would like. Often this complaint was associated with fractional rigs.
Is that the problem? Is the forestay too loose?
What do you mean by wobbly? Does it not furl or reef properly?

Quote:
Originally Posted by papasailor View Post
I am still looking for solutions to extending the forstay. I could use the eye jaw at the top, but I don't have access to a gin pole or a light enough plus strong enough volenteer to go up in the bosun's chair. The weight of the forstay and furling extrusion is heavy just by itself. (A halyard would act as a temp jib)

Taking the pin out of the mast head, holding the forestay with one hand, using another hand to put on the eye jaw, while growing yet another hand to insert pin, cotter pin finally pulling the whole thing up to align with the mast head.
If there were no halyard to tie the furler off to temporarily, then I would tie it to the same halyard that I was currently employing.
I would use a rolling hitch so that I could adjust the hight as needed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by papasailor View Post
the real solution is of course a new, longer forestay but that involves taking the forstay and extrusion down, puttin in new wire and then getting it back up. All the same obstacles exist as with adding the eye at top.

And finally, I am trying to do all of this on a limited budget. As an not too good alternative, I could race with my mast raked forward and not expect too much performance or pointing.
Whether you use a toggle at the top or the bottom of the stay, if you are trying to save money, it's really the least expensive way to extend the length.
Use a halyard to hold the mast forward and slacken the backstay.
If you don't have enough halyards to accomplish everything that you need to, then use one or two of them to haul up a reeved double block.
Unfortunately, it's not a real easy job. If all the specialized jobs that we as sailors endeavor to learn to do ourselves were real easy then there would be a whole lot of people out of work.
If this is beyond your ability right now, and you don't friends that can help you, then you may be forced to hire a rigger to accomplish your objective.

Steve
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