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  #21  
Old 06-03-2008
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On many boats, the jacklines terminate about a tether length before the stern, so you can't fall off the back of the boat. On a boat with an aft swim platform, it might make sense to run them almost all the way aft, so that you might have a chance to climb back aboard via the platform.
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  #22  
Old 06-03-2008
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An inflatable with built in harness, two legs on the harness, quick release at the harness connection, hard attachment points in the cockpit, plus jacklines running forward from the cockpit = best set-up.
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  #23  
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What do you hook the jacklines into at the stern?
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  #24  
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Depends on the boat. Might not work so well on a center cockpit boat... there is no one best way to do this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by speciald View Post
An inflatable with built in harness, two legs on the harness, quick release at the harness connection, hard attachment points in the cockpit, plus jacklines running forward from the cockpit = best set-up.

Tweitz-

Can be any number of things: padeyes specifically setup for the jackline, stern cleats, stern pulpit stanchions, etc. Depends on the boat. On some, the cleats and stanchions might not be in the right osition or backed strongly enough.
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  #25  
Old 06-03-2008
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best jack line material

what type of line would best be used for jack lines on a small (23') boat?
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Old 06-03-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmd View Post
what type of line would best be used for jack lines on a small (23') boat?
The line should be the same size/strength as it would be for a larger boat -- i.e., it doesn't get downsized for smaller boats. Make sure your hard points for mounting are up to the task.

It seems most folks these days opt for 1" nylon webbing, since it's easier to walk on than the round lifeline wire material sometimes used. Something like this:

Jacklines
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Was reading about this:

West Marine Tether

It says that the load that will "trip" the load stress indicator is only 900lbs. Is it me or does that seem low? I am used to these things having a fairly ridiculous safety factor. Maybe I am just thinking too much.

Also what does this mean:
"Nonmagnetic, stainless steel snap shackle at chest releases from the harness under load". Does that mean if you need to you can get out even while under load.
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  #28  
Old 06-03-2008
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It's just a big snap shackle. All should release under a very heavy load. I have the SOSpenders one w/o the colored threads or elastic built in. I've put almost all my weight on it and it releases just fine, very sudden.

The safety factor is much higher than 900lbs. That's just when they want you to replace it. I'd expect it to hold 3x that amount. But add UV rays, salt water, and chaffing, and you start to get a lot closer the the 900# advertised weight.
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  #29  
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Merlin-

The stress indicator is to show that the tether was used under a high strain and may fail in the future, since the stitching may now be compromised. A 200 lb. person falling across a heeling boat may generate in excess of 2000 lbs of force against the tether. This is why you don't attach tethers to lifelines. Given the lever arm of the stanchion, it would most likely damage or destroy the stanchion. BTW, the breaking load on most tethers and jacklines is supposed to be abut 6000 lbs.

Yes, you need to be able to release the tether under a load. A good example is when a bowman on the boat I was on got his harness caught over a spinnaker sheet, and the boat broached... the spinnaker dropped into the water and his tether was tangled in the sheet when the boat got knocked down. If he couldn't release his tether, he might have drowned.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #30  
Old 06-03-2008
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Great suggestions. I never knew about having clips on both ends of the tether. Ours have a clip on one end and a spliced eye on the other that gets looped through 2 D rings on the harness (Jim Bouy brand). I've always been uncomfortable with that, but didn't think about it until reading this thread.

As for the jack lines, I've never been sure why people use webbing. I've used spare STA-SETX halyard lines (the ones that I replaced because the colored tracers were getting faded). Since I take exceptional care with my running rigging, puling them off the boat each winter and replacing them every 5 years or so, they should be much stronger than 1" webbing. I attach the line to my bow and stern docking cleats under the assumption that if the cleat can hold the boat, they can hold me.
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