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post #21 of 37 Old 06-05-2008 Thread Starter
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Thanks Michael!!! Much appreciated. I feel like printing the list and heading to the drug store this evening!

~Julie

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post #22 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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Julie-

Don't forget the basics, like band-aids, which TxLngHrn has left off his list.

As for gloves, get nitrile, rather than latex...since some people are allergic to latex.

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post #23 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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Bandaids and gloves

Julie and SD,
I intentionally skipped bandaids, they seal a wound too well causing maceration (skin breakdown..that slimy white look you have when you take the bandaid off) which increases infection risk. Of course this only happens if they dont get wet, fall off and get stuck in a corner in the lazerrette forcing contortions of your body to remove them after causing several more scrapes and bruises. I much prefer to clean wound with Betadine and H2O, dry wound and then cover with 4x4 or a cut piece of 4x4 secured with vet wrap. Much more secure.

As for gloves, well fitting dish gloves are very sturdy reusable after washing and don't rip like nitrile. The concept of sterile is a myth outside of the operating room. The only advantage to Nitrile over dish gloves is an ability to feel a pulse through the nitrile.

Just my humble opinion.
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post #24 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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Some band-aids don't seal as well as others. Keeping the wound dry and clean is important.

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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #25 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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First Aid Kit

I am an RN and was just thinking of doing the same thing myself because we have just purchased a boat. I will get together with some of my fellow nurses and come up with a list for you which you can place in any plastic container. This will be much cheaper and have things you will actually use and need instead of 5 different kinds of bandaids.
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post #26 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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Tototoo-

Look forward to seeing your list. BTW, I would recommend you read the post I link to in my signature. It will help you get more out of your time on sailnet.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #27 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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Julie, Target.com carries a wide variety of prepacked kist including the "American Red Cross" labelled ones. (The stores don't carry anywhere near as many.) WalMart also carries inexpensive first-aid kits.

But pretty much every kit you'll find has been targeted to someone's ideas and that may not meet your needs. One idea is to carry one smaller "cuts and aids" box, with the usual splinter tweezer, bandaids and antibiotic cream, etc. and then to carry a second larger kit (which stays closed until needed) that has the larger bandages and dressings, bottles of peroxide, saline, and alcohol for cleaning of larger problems.

By the way, a "dressing" is what you actually put on a wound, a "bandage" is something that holds the dressing in place. 4x4 tefla pads can be used as dressings on almost anything, and then covered with a bandage as needed to hold them in place.

You may also want a product like QuikClot QR, which is a powder that helps coagulation and stops bleeding from larger cuts. If you need to stop bleeding the traditional methods are in any first aid book or class (classes are a good idea for sailors) but plain white table sugar also helps coagulation. It is fairly sterile, eventually dissolves away without doing any harm, just helps form a clot and scab better than nothing. And doesn't sting. (You put the products on before the dressing.)

The more expensive commercial kits tend to be more comprehensive and very nicely organized--but you pay dearly for that organization. In any case, a med kit needs to be gone through twice a year looking for expiring products, so they can be replaced as needed.
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Well said HS...

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
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—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #29 of 37 Old 06-05-2008
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QuickClot

Just a warning,
QuickClot and similar products have shown to be of minimal benefit (if any) in most non-company sponsered trials, and in some cases has shown to cause tissue necrosis (death of tissue, not good if trying to avoid infection/scarring/lawsuits). Good bandaging technique and pressure dressings are all that is needed for almost all occasions IMHO.
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I did pretty good from memory :)

Okay, I just got home and looked threw my lists, I found one item I think is appropriate for the kit I recommended here but did not mention. I'm sure I'll think of others as I try to go to sleep tonight
A large syringe - nothing irrigates wounds as well as a large syringe, preferably through some sort of tip to get the right pressure - I use an 18g. catheter, but a basting needle would work fine if you are carful not to poke the person
As I said before feel free to email or pm me with specific questions about your situation and feel even more free to blast my kit ideas. Great discussion leads to great learning for all involved.
Michael

ps hellosailor, I reread my post to you and realized I forgot to compliment you on the very well written response to the OP. I didn't mean for my post to come out as just a critique. I just wanted to add my 2 cents which is worth a little under 1 cent most times.

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