Traveler Set-Up -Better Solution? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 06-24-2008
DrB DrB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New England
Posts: 966
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 8
DrB will become famous soon enough
Traveler Set-Up -Better Solution?

On my Pearson 10M, I have the traveler in the cockpit. The traveler has the mainsheet block/locking cam car on a single track. On each end of the car are two pulleys. On each end of the track, they is a another set of pulleys and a locking cam cleat on the side of the cockpit.

There is one line that threads through one side of the traveler car, both set of pulleys, and the corresponding locking cam cleat one one side and then underneath the car to the other side, where is is threaded the same way. The free end of each side of the line is tied off to an eyelet near the cam cleats. This is probably not well described.

To move the traveler, you release the line from one locking cleat on the leeward side, then pull on the proper section of the line on the windard side, which pulls the traveler to that side. The line is then cleated.

The problem with this set-up, in my opnion, is that since the line is essentianly a loop with no "free end", it is difficult to easily move with one hand. You can't easily grab it and yank on it. Also, becasue of the multiple pulleys on each side, figuring out which portion of the line one needs to grab and pull is often "a guess", and you really need to "move" a lot of rope length to move the traveler 4 feet. Also the long section bewteen each cam cleat often catches on my foot as I move around/on the bridge deck.

On a J105 that I crew on, it is set-up with very similar hardware, except there are two lines instead of the the one continuous line. To move the traveler, you release the line in the locked cam cleat, and then pull on the free end of the line on the other side and lock it in the other cam cleat. One line and no guessing one which to pull, 1/2 of the length of line to pull, and nothing to really catch my foot on.

Aside from the increased force needed to move the traveler because of the use of less pulleys, is there anything "wrong" with this set-up?

Thanks.

DrB
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 06-24-2008
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,686
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
"IF" you can setup your current system like the one on the 105, nothing wrong with it. On the other hand, the 105 may have a different carr or ca cleat setup than you have, and life can get interesting that way.

I have a Harken windward sheeting carr setup that has one continuous line that works well for me. I could have set it up with one line per side, but had a 3-1 vs a 4-1 with the way I set it up. Before tacking, ie release the windward side line, the carr goes to leeward, tack, and the main is set to catch the wind as I round. Works well on my Jeanneau 30. I have pics if need be.

marty
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 06-24-2008
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,627
Thanks: 68
Thanked 187 Times in 179 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
The advantage of a loop on the traveller control lines is that you can always "reach" the other side to release it when you want to pull the traveller car towards you. With a split-line system often the side across the boat is not quickly accessible.

If it's difficult to use and gets underfoot, then I suspect the loop is simply too shorrt. Making a longer loop will put the extra line on the cockpit sole and not a tripping hazard. It will also give you more slack to get a better pull on the side you are trying to adjust.

The number of parts is not tied to either setup.. you can have as many parts as you want to get the power you need, but the flip side of good mechanical advantage is the increased line you have to pull through.
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 06-24-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SEMIJim will become famous soon enough SEMIJim will become famous soon enough
We have a Harken windward sheeting traveller on our P30. It's rigged as a single line with both ends free. It works beautifully.

Jim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 06-24-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SEMIJim will become famous soon enough SEMIJim will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
Before tacking, ie release the windward side line, the carr goes to leeward, tack, and the main is set to catch the wind as I round.
Am I missing something here? Perhaps something glaringly obvious?

With windward sheeting: If you release the windward line the car will go all the way to the leeward end of the traveller. ISTM the effects of doing this would be: You'd spill the main on the current tack, losing drive; you'd end-up with the car on the wrong end of the traveller for the new tack, and it would slow the turn through the wind.

Jim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 06-24-2008
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,686
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
Jim,

That can happen, but is short handed this works fairly well and quick at the other end of the tack to power up the main. Especially if one is operating the tiller, the other the genoa sheets. With a crew of 4-6, then I find waiting later int he turn to release the main works better.

At the end of the tack, the car is on the windward side of the boat, probably sooner there than wanted needed, but, a way to do things short handed.

Marty
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-27-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: MA
Posts: 8
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
truewind is on a distinguished road
Marty,

You mentioned in your post on 6-24-08 that you have pics if needed. In my case pics would be of great help as I am not sure just what it is the windward line is doing after being released.

I do have Harken Windward car which I don’t fully understand.

The boat I am refitting is a Pearson Coaster, 30 ft, Hull #11. Yes it is a rather old boat as it was built in 1966. At this point there is not much Pearson left in her.

Fred

Last edited by truewind; 09-27-2008 at 08:11 PM. Reason: additional information
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 09-27-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,710
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SEMIJim will become famous soon enough SEMIJim will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by truewind View Post
Marty,

You mentioned in your post on 6-24-08 that you have pics if needed. In my case pics would be of great help as I am not sure just what it is the windward line is doing after being released.

I do have Harken Windward car which I donít fully understand.
If you truly have a windward sheeting traveller, you don't have to release the windward line manually, as it'll automatically be released when the windward side becomes the leeward side. That's the beauty of a windward sheeting traveller

Now, if you're in heavy air, so you've been keeping the traveller on the low side to spill the main a bit to depower it: As you're making your tack, or soon thereafter (depending on your crew compliment), you'll need to ease the new windward side to let the traveller down to the new leeward side. OTOH: Let's say you've been running the traveller on the high side to get the boom where it needs to be because you've let the mainsheet well out for more twist. Then, after a tack, you'll need to trim the new windward side to bring the boom up again--on the new high side.

Jim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Perfect Traveler Sam Boyle Racing Articles 0 05-12-2004 08:00 PM
Solution to using traveler under load?? Shaman Gear & Maintenance 8 06-14-2002 07:24 PM
Set and Drift Made Simple Jim Sexton Seamanship Articles 0 04-19-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:27 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.