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-   -   Barient 10 winch problem (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/45355-barient-10-winch-problem.html)

clavipes 07-26-2008 01:55 PM

Barient 10 winch problem
 
I have a Ranger 29 with Barient 10s as secondary winches.
Recently one of them jammed solid - would not rotate without a lot of force. I thought - Oh No! - freshwater complacency has caught up with me, I have not looked at these in years.
I got a manual from the web, and where it says 'lift the drum' I had to (gently) hammer it upwards for 5 mins. to get it off. I expected to find all sorts of nastiness inside, but no, all was fine and well greased. I cleaned and relubricated, but now cannot re-assemble without excessive force (gentle hammering is not enough)

This problem has been seen once before. I quote from a Sailnet message of 2005

|My question is about the little Barient 10 single-speed winches:
|They are EXTREMELY tight going back on. The bearings drop over the
|shafts fine,slip into the winch housings fine, but are near-impossible to get
|all three pieces together without dramatic effort. I assume there is
|clearance in the bearingrollers that gets shifted one way or the other |when assembled.

|How do these get assembled without damaging the bearings?

|Regards, Tom D.

The only answer to this was:

>Try this website....
>arco-winches.com/barient.html

This site has standard maintenance instructions, of no help with this unexpected problem

So far my only idea is to remove the base, set it up on a lathe and remove a thou or two of bronze. This is drastic and irreversible - and it doesn't make any sense that it should be necessary.

Could chill the base / heat the drum for assembly, but then I assume it would jam again when all gets to the same temperature.

Any better suggestions?

David

sailboy21 07-27-2008 01:41 AM

I had the same problem this spring. However, I had serviced the winch before winter and was quite surprised that it had jammed. I also had to use brute force to remove the drum. The bearings, drum, and base were not the culprit. The little shaft (pinion spindle) that holds the idler gears between the drum and the center mainshaft had seized. I had to hammer the thing out of the winch base with a brass drift... The corrective action was simply a little emmory cloth and then a good polishing.

EDIT: Separate question that is pertinent to the discussion: What type of grease is best? I had used the brown stinky Lewmar stuff before the winch sized, and as it seized in 6 months with minimal use I decided to try something new. After I serviced the frozen winch I used Superlube... I love Superlube. Great for steering, salt water impervious. Then I go to the arco site and they advise not to use grease with added teflon.. so is Superlube (with PTFE) somehow bad???

bradfalk 07-31-2008 04:27 PM

I haven't heard of superlube, but was told that using any lithium grease was the same as the lewmar stuff. any of you have any experience with Barient 17's? single speed self-tailing. I have a new (old) boat and am overhauling the winches which was a process just to get them off the coamings. But, they actually don't look too bad inside. I figured WD40 everything I could, dry, then apply Li-grease to the bearing etc and some transmission oil to the pawls. I don't have any of the diagrams for the winches and don't know how much to "take apart"- was just going to explore and see what easily comes apart. This sound reasonable? thanks- brad

sneuman 07-31-2008 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradfalk (Post 348292)
I haven't heard of superlube, but was told that using any lithium grease was the same as the lewmar stuff. any of you have any experience with Barient 17's? single speed self-tailing. I have a new (old) boat and am overhauling the winches which was a process just to get them off the coamings. But, they actually don't look too bad inside. I figured WD40 everything I could, dry, then apply Li-grease to the bearing etc and some transmission oil to the pawls. I don't have any of the diagrams for the winches and don't know how much to "take apart"- was just going to explore and see what easily comes apart. This sound reasonable? thanks- brad

I second that. White lithium at any hardware store -- 10x cheaper, probably. You can use it liberally on bearings, etc. but manufacturers recommend a light oil instead on the pawl springs. I did 4 of mine this winter that way and they've been working great.

sailingdog 07-31-2008 06:14 PM

Don't ever use anything heavier than a light oil on pawls and springs. Doing so can cause them to gum up and prevent them from working properly.


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