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merttan 08-25-2008 07:15 PM

Alternative material
 
Hello everyone,
I was walking around my work site and noticed some material that was unfamiliar to me... It's called Azek... It's plastic based, UV proof, high yield to temperature, paintable, and working on it as easy as (maybe easier than)wood... I grabbed some cut out pieces meant to be thrown away, and used it as support beams, core material, backing plates, and shelfing... It's light weight, it actually floats, which may make it a good material for rebuilding my rudder...
As far as price tag goes, it's expensive... However, cheaper than starboard...
I thought some may like to know... Enjoy your sailing...

Aria 08-25-2008 07:57 PM

How does it compare to Delrin? How much water will it absorb compared to Delrin.

sailingdog 08-25-2008 08:22 PM

My question is how strong is the material? What does it have for compressive strength? Tensile strength? Torsional stiffness? etc. It is probably like Starboard, which is also an artificial lumber, but isn't recommended for structurally significant use. The fact that it floats tends to lead me to believe it is probably a form of Polyethylene or a foamed plastic product, like some forms of starboard, and may have the same problems with lack of strength.

fullkeel7 08-25-2008 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aria (Post 358509)
How does it compare to Delrin? How much water will it absorb compared to Delrin.

Not sure how it compares to Delrin, but they say Azek is water resistant. More info hereAZEK Home

Also could not find any compression figures.

Bob

davidpm 08-25-2008 08:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingdog (Post 358519)
My question is how strong is the material? What does it have for compressive strength? Tensile strength? Torsional stiffness? etc. It is probably like Starboard, which is also an artificial lumber, but isn't recommended for structurally significant use. The fact that it floats tends to lead me to believe it is probably a form of Polyethylene or a foamed plastic product, like some forms of starboard, and may have the same problems with lack of strength.

I am a retired carpenter / cabinet maker and have used the stuff.
I used it for a sub-jamb for half circle window. It is made and used for exterior trim like soffetts.
It has almost no structural strength.
If you get a small cutoff it seems pretty strong. A longer piece feels like a wet noodle.
As a support beam most anything is stiff if it is deep enough but I would want to load it to failure before trusting it. Does it deflect with constant load? Does heat make a difference?
The problem with these new materials is that they can have failure properties that are significatly different from traditional materials.

As for a core material i used 3/4 inch and it was sold as boards so there would be a lot of seams.
I just looked up the material on their website and notice that they sell trim and deck material.
The deck material may be stronger.

sailingdog 08-25-2008 08:53 PM

Thanks DavidPM. That was pretty much what I thought, based on my experience with Starboard and some of the new composite Deck materials. BTW, some of the composite deck materials seem to make excellent backing board material for certain applications on a sailboat.


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