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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 09-14-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midlifesailor View Post
The disadvantage I've read about with the Harken system is that they stack pretty high leaving increased windage vs. traditional slugs. Probably not an issue for a lot of folks but maybe a consideration for those that might find themselves in truly serious weather.
I have Harken Batcars paired with a Doyle Stakpac and, yes the Batcars do stack higher than I would like. I don't personally have a problem because I am tall and can just reach the headboard but most others that sail on my boat have to climb the halyard winches to reach the headboard.

As far as the implications for serious weather, the Stakpac zips right up and leaves only the tip of the headboard exposed so I don't have a problem there. The heavy weather implication that scares me just a little is the ease with which the wind can hoist the sail by itself and if your heaving to in a serious blow, be sure to tie a line around the sail to stop it going back up the mast!! (or zip the stakpac if you have the courage to be on deck long enough)

And I agree that it does influence reefing inasmuch as the Batcars don't stick when they're under pressure. And with the Stakpac, I never tie the bunt of the sail up, it lays between the lazy jacks and has never presented a problem. Shaking out a reef is also easier for smaller, less strong crew because of the ease with which the sail is hoisted.

I have no experience with Strong Tack but I would be very reluctant to swap Batcars with anything else.

Andre
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  #12  
Old 09-14-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by midlifesailor View Post
We don't have major problems with rasing or lowering the main on our C36, but since I'm looking into new sails I've considered including one of the mainsail handling systems.

The disadvantage I've read about with the Harken system is that they stack pretty high leaving increased windage vs. traditional slugs. Probably not an issue for a lot of folks but maybe a consideration for those that might find themselves in truly serious weather.

I'm not sure what the downside of the Tides system might be.
On a CS 36 the strong track will work just fine. You are not crossing oceans with the boat and the main is not that big. Recommended the Strong track to a friend who had a Sabre 362 and he was very happy.

But it's not the same as Harken Battcars -- but odds are you don't need them. Once your main gets bigger and you are really loading up the cars is when it shines. Regarding windage - me thinks the delta is insignificant. If you have a dodger that is way way more windage right there.

Secondly I have never had an issue with the height but then I can't reach the boom anyway without some height assist from the granny bars. We reef with a two line system [on purpose less chafe] so just pull down the luff and leech and never go forward till it's safe. We were cruising for about 2 yrs and it was never an issue.
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Old 09-15-2008
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Can the Doyle Stakpac work in conjunction with Battcars

Harken recommends their Lazy Jack system. Can the Doyle Stakpac be used in lieu of the Harken system and/or does the Harken system have as neat a zip-up enclosure as the Doyle Stakpac. One other question, for those who have retrofitted to the Harken Battcars, would you mind providing us with a ball park estimate of the cost? The debate is retrofit our fully batten main with Dutchman to in-mast furling or to a Batttcar system with lazy jacks. Thank you for your ongoing help with all of this.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmoverbay View Post
Harken recommends their Lazy Jack system. Can the Doyle Stakpac be used in lieu of the Harken system and/or does the Harken system have as neat a zip-up enclosure as the Doyle Stakpac. One other question, for those who have retrofitted to the Harken Battcars, would you mind providing us with a ball park estimate of the cost? The debate is retrofit our fully batten main with Dutchman to in-mast furling or to a Batttcar system with lazy jacks. Thank you for your ongoing help with all of this.
bmoverbay
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The Stakpac and similar systems really are just lazy-jacks with an integral sailcover, so there is no reason they would not be compatable with the Harken batt cars.

Personally, I'd prefer the batt cars to in mast furling and its certainly a less expensive option.
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Old 09-15-2008
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Personally I would chose either the Battcar solution or in boom furling. In boom furling gives you better sail shape etc than in mast. Also if you have a furler issue you can still drop the main.
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When I checked last year, it would have cost me approx $25,000 to convert by 41 ft'er to a boom furler including recutting the main. Although a but off-topic, I'd be interested if anyone has done it for much less
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Old 09-15-2008
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What I generally do with the main halyard, when the mainsail is down, is lead it around the halyard winches on the mast and then snug it up. There is no way that the main sail can be raised without human intervention that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
As far as the implications for serious weather, the Stakpac zips right up and leaves only the tip of the headboard exposed so I don't have a problem there. The heavy weather implication that scares me just a little is the ease with which the wind can hoist the sail by itself and if your heaving to in a serious blow, be sure to tie a line around the sail to stop it going back up the mast!! (or zip the stakpac if you have the courage to be on deck long enough)

And I agree that it does influence reefing inasmuch as the Batcars don't stick when they're under pressure. And with the Stakpac, I never tie the bunt of the sail up, it lays between the lazy jacks and has never presented a problem. Shaking out a reef is also easier for smaller, less strong crew because of the ease with which the sail is hoisted.

I have no experience with Strong Tack but I would be very reluctant to swap Batcars with anything else.

Andre
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  #18  
Old 09-16-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
What I generally do with the main halyard, when the mainsail is down, is lead it around the halyard winches on the mast and then snug it up. There is no way that the main sail can be raised without human intervention that way.
That's one way of doing it but I found that when I do this, the halyard now lays against the mast (comes down from the masthead to a mast-mounted winch) and it's difficult to stop it slapping and I can't stand that noise . . . . . so then it needs another tie to keep the halyard away from the mast . . . . and frankly a simple tie around the boom/sail is less trouble.

Andre
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