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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #11  
Old 09-25-2008
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I guess I could as well do a bulkhead mount as you did Faster but was thinking of trying to keep the heat as low in the boat as possible more then anything. And worried about people hitting their head constantly while seated at the table.
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  #12  
Old 09-25-2008
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Requires no bulkhead

Someone was going to suggest it . . . .

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  #13  
Old 09-25-2008
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But very high maintenance... especially the particular model in your photo.

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Someone was going to suggest it . . . .

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  #14  
Old 09-25-2008
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Here's a picture of the Dickensen propane chimney exit on my last boat. I used 3 overlapping Boom Bails to keep the lines from snagging and in the 4 years after installation I never had a line snag.
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  #15  
Old 09-25-2008
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Scott, on a previous 25 footer that we had, I built a little wood stove and installed in on its own companion way hatch board with the pipe exiting out the backside and then up. We burned presto log rounds in it. It barely took the chill off that little boat and it wouldn't burn but an hour at a time, but it's what we could do with the resources we had (in other words too po' to buy a real stove) It definitely looked like something like Jethro would throw together but I'm not the kind of fellow who worries too much about what other people think. Anyway, I totally get the idea of not wanting to cut a hole through the cabin top so that's the alternative that we came up with.

Omatako's solution looks good too, but I'm not sure where you would store that when not in use and I'm not sure whether it's vented to the outside or not, because air circulation is critical.
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  #16  
Old 09-25-2008
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Originally Posted by Hartley18 View Post
Ron, just curious: Exactly how much heat do you get out the front of these things? Is there a limit to how close you can install combustibles (like the table) to the front of it??

(The only reason I ask is that you have an electric fan heater on the floor.. )

Cameron
The heater is our winter warmer while in our slip, or at a marina and plugged in. The electric heater is more effective, but given a couple of hours the fireplace will keep us quite toasty. We generally close the forward door in the head to avoid heating the V berth space which we don't use much.

This is the smaller 9000 btu model, the 12000 is noticeably more effective, and that boat had a lot more open space too.

So if we're plugged in we save on LPG and use the electric.

When the heater is running you can hold your hand on the sides of the unit. The stack gets VERY hot and it would be nice to have a guard on it, but the unit itself requires only minimal clearance. The glass gets warm too, but there is a heat exchanger and the fan blows warm air out of the vent above the glass (directed downward) much like a forced air system.

The addition of a small 12v fan to move the heat around more is on our list.
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Old 09-25-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillraining View Post
I guess I could as well do a bulkhead mount as you did Faster but was thinking of trying to keep the heat as low in the boat as possible more then anything. And worried about people hitting their head constantly while seated at the table.
Mounting the heater as high as that on the bulkhead does look a bit awkward, and would be problematic in other ways as you suggest.

Hard to tell from the pic, but is there space enough on the side of your settee in front of the mast (down low?)

.. another alternative I've seen is mounting the heater on the mast itself - any height you want and obviously central to the cabin space. It would require some thought as to the bracket and mounting, but it could be done.
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  #18  
Old 09-25-2008
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I agree, our propane Dickinson keeps the main saloon nice a toasty, but the heat does not reach the aft berth. We too close the doors to the V-berth and the head to help contain the heat. I find that we use it more in the early spring season than we do in the fall.

If you want to heat the entire boat, depending on boat size, a forced air type installation might be the way to go, but I think that would be more money and a harder install up front.

As has been pointed out, the bulkhead mounted Dickinson has a two piece chimney. The oxygen that is burned is brought in from the outside so oxygen depletion is not a problem. We love ours as well.

Also, they sell a guard for the chimney vent. Christy made his own, but you can purchase one with the heater.



(Our boat is trashed in this picture, teenagers. Its about the only pic I have of our heater)
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  #19  
Old 09-25-2008
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Still- the forced air heaters like the Wallas, Espar and Webasto don't require the engine to be running. They are small diesel fired furnaces that only require a small amount of power to run the fan and ignition. Installation can be a big job though because of the need to run several 3" flexible duct hoses to the outlets. The Wallas I am installing puts out about the equivalent of 4000 watts, so hopefully it will keep us warm on all but the coldest of days. I sure like the looks of the bulkhead heaters though, and seeing the flames. Maybe we can just find a fireplace program for the laptop and snuggle up close to it and burn some woodchips on the stove for atmosphere .

John
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  #20  
Old 09-25-2008
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Still,

We discussed heaters generically in a couple of threads last year. Search "cabin heaters" and you should find a couple threads that cover the pros and cons of the various types. Good info there.

Faster and TJK pretty well covered the Dickinson Newports. I like their propane systems for the clean burn. Diesel would be okay I guess. The guys at Dickinson told me that the solid fuel version is primarily for decorative/ambiance purpose and they did not recommend it for serious heating requirements. We got our P9000 from an outfit out your way called Go-2-Marine. They were the cheapest by far.

From your photos, you look to have it easy, installation-wise. Since we have an "open" interior with no bulkheads to speak of, I had to build out a surface on which to mount the heater. We ordered the optional interior chimney guard, as well as the optional exterior stack protector (which you can sort-of see in the second photo, on the starboard coachroof just aft the forward hatch). Sorry, these are not the best photos but they're all I've got.



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